Best guess: Chavez was 185, to Sergio's 167

September, 17, 2012
9/17/12
12:34
AM ET
Many of us fight fans still felt the after-efffects of the buzz we felt on Saturday night, when Sergio Martinez dominated the son of the legend, Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. at the Thomas and Mack Center in Las Vegas, but nearly got smacked down in an 11th hour assault, hitting the deck with over a minute left in the 12th, and just barely surviving to reach the final bell. Martinez, a 37 year-old Argentine, looked like the stellar pugilist, the pound for pound ace pundits deemed him, for 35 minutes, and acted like the ultimate gutty warrior as he tried to swing his way out of deep trouble in the home stretch.

Boxing fans debated deep into the morning on Twitter whether or not we'd see Martinez-Chavez Jr. II; we checked in with Nathan Lewkowicz, the VP of Sampson Promotions, and son of Martinez advisor Sampson Lewkowicz to get some intel.

Firstly, he told us there is no rematch clause in the contracts for the first fight, so there is nothing automatic about a sequel, though promoter Bob Arum said Cowboys owner Jerry Jones has shown interest in bringing the re-do to his stadium.

I asked Nathan if Sergio didn't get his chops gently busted post-fight by trainer Pablo Sarmiento for not clutching and grabbing and running out the clock after getting dropped. "No, Pablo said they trained for that, to possibly get hit and get knocked down, but also to get up from knockdowns like that," Nathan told NYFightBlog. "Personally I think Sergio wanted to take him out and not just win on the cards. Sergio makes exciting fights, people should give him more credit for entertaining crowds." And, I'd offer, credit for not showing that he was compromised during the tussle. He suffered a broken left hand, in round four, and torn ligaments in his right knee when he was knocked down, Nathan told us.

Many were struck by what they saw as a noticeable size differential in the ring Saturday. We don't know what that differential was, because Junior declined to step on a scale for PPV producer HBO. I asked Nathan what he and Team Martinez thought Junior weighed on fight night, with an educated guess. "Junior was probably 185 pounds," he said. "Sergio was 167."

Perhaps time to return back to day-of weigh ins, and set limits on weight gain, perhaps to no more than ten pounds, on the day of the fight?
Michael Woods, a member of the board of the Boxing Writers Association of America, has been covering boxing since 1991. He writes about boxing for ESPN The Magazine and is the news editor for TheSweetScience.com.

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