Schaefer: Mayweather bout in NY? Unlikely

July, 18, 2013
7/18/13
3:35
PM ET
I know we can't get ahead of ourselves, it wouldn't be prudent, but I admit I am curious as to what's next for Floyd Mayweather after he fights Canelo Alvarez on Sept. 14. Since I expect him to have his way with the talented and strong but still-the-slightest-bit-green Alvarez, I am looking a bit beyond that clash. I do wonder, what with the whirlwind tour of New York City that Amir Khan has been doing of late, is a Mayweather-Khan clash in the works in the near future? If so, could it occur in NYC?

I posed the question to Golden Boy Promotions' day-to-day boss Richard Schaefer.

"There are a lot of ifs in that question," he said. "Khan will be in a difficult fight against Devon Alexander in December, and so it's a question if he would win and how would he win. And also if Mayweather wins; the Canelo fight is his most dangerous. There are too many ifs. If I occupy my time with too many ifs, I wouldn't get enough done.

"The likelihood of Mayweather fighting in New York, that's slim to none. He would love to fight in New York, as he made clear at the recent Times Square press conference for the Canelo fight. It's one of the biggest media markets in the world. But not if he has to pay the state income tax, which I think is like 10 percent, which would be like 5 million bucks. He's a Las Vegas resident, not a New York resident. There's no way to offset [that tax hit]. As nice it would be for him to fight in New York, I'm not sure it's fair to ask him to pay $5 million for an hour or so of work. The tax code might have to be amended. Maybe you could have it prorated or capped. Between the legislators and the people at Madison Square Garden and Barclays, maybe they can do something. It's just difficult to bring those big fights to New York City."
Michael Woods, a member of the board of the Boxing Writers Association of America, has been covering boxing since 1991. He writes about boxing for ESPN The Magazine and is the news editor for TheSweetScience.com.

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