What if Mayweather or Canelo don't make weight?

September, 12, 2013
9/12/13
7:17
PM ET
Floyd Mayweather is nothing if not a shrewd picker when it comes to choosing his foes and hashing out terms, financial and otherwise, heading into his bouts. After 17 years as a pro, he knows all the angles inside the ring and outside, in the rooms where negotiations take place. The terms of his Saturday fight, which will be for some junior middleweight titles, include the stipulation that neither he nor his foe, Canelo Alvarez, may be more than 152 pounds at the Friday weigh in.

That should not be a problem for Floyd, who has the metabolism and work ethic to handle eating fast food burgers with regularity, and not bloat up past 160 pounds, even in between fights.

But Alvarez, still growing into a manly physique at 23, might find it harder to get to 152. That's the point, really, to give Floyd an extra edge heading into the scrap, which takes place at the MGM Grand, and on pay-per-view Saturday night.

But what if Mayweather or Alvarez don't make the contracted weight, 152 pounds or less, tomorrow? Would the show go on?

I asked the executive director of the Nevada State Athletic Commission, Keith Kizer, to put on his hypothetical hat, and share what the consequences would be.

"If either guy misses the 152 pounds, there's a huge financial penalty, I don't know what it is, it's a private agreement between them," Kizer said. "Promoter Richard Schaefer tells me it's huge if either guy misses weight. If they miss weight, but they still weigh 154 or under, it's still for the title. The fight goes on. I do not expect anyone to be over 152 tomorrow."

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Michael Woods, a member of the board of the Boxing Writers Association of America, has been covering boxing since 1991. He writes about boxing for ESPN The Magazine and is the news editor for TheSweetScience.com.

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