De La Hoya 'doing fine' in rehab

October, 24, 2013
10/24/13
3:28
PM ET
Hall of Famer Oscar De La Hoya made news Sept. 10, during the Floyd Mayweather-Canelo Alvarez fight week, when he announced he would enter rehab after a substance-abuse slip.

The 40-year-old, six-division champion who hung up the gloves after his Dec. 6, 2008, loss to Manny Pacquiao, put out a release that said, in part, "I will not be at the fight to cheer Canelo to victory since I have voluntarily admitted myself into a treatment facility."

That statement was distributed four days before the 36-year-old Mayweather showed young gun Alvarez, age 23, that his mastery of the sport wasn't to be trifled with.

De La Hoya's battle with substance abuse first reared its head in May 2011, when news hit that he'd entered Promises, a Malibu, Calif., rehab facility. He then admitted publicly in August that he'd struggled with alcohol and cocaine usage, and said at that time he'd been in "rehabs" previously.

Wednesday afternoon, I asked Richard Schaefer, who runs the day-to-day operations of Golden Boy Promotions, the outfit headed up by the boxer now beset by personal demons, for an update on "The Golden Boy."

"He is good," said Schaefer, days out from the Saturday Golden Boy event in Atlantic City, N.J., topped by a Bernard Hopkins-Karo Murat main event. "He's still in rehab. He extended his time there a bit. He knows it's important he's focusing on what he needs to focus on, himself and his family. I talked to him, went to see him as well. He's doing fine."

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Michael Woods, a member of the board of the Boxing Writers Association of America, has been covering boxing since 1991. He writes about boxing for ESPN The Magazine and is the news editor for TheSweetScience.com.

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