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Saturday, November 3, 2012
Staten Island fight writer Richardson is OK

By Michael Woods

ESPN NY checked in with fellow fight writer Matt Richardson, a Staten Islander who writes for Fightnews.com. We asked him to share what he has experienced and is seeing.

"It's pure devastation in many areas on Staten Island," Richardson said. "Almost all of those killed in Sandy lived within a mile or less of my co-op apartment. My father had to come help me and my girlfriend escape as water was rushing into our complex. We didn't know when the water would stop or if another tide would come in. We walked three blocks with a petrified bulldog until we reached dry land (at least dry enough that we could access moving vehicles). At one point, the water was up to our upper chests. Cars and dumpsters were floating down the block. Some people were literally opening their second floor windows and screaming for help. It was unreal. A boat washed up down the block from me and was found in an Italian restaurant parking lot. A refrigerator is still laying in the woods behind my complex. Dumpsters floated for blocks.

"The used car dealerships have cars just laying on top of each other, moved into that position from the tsunami-like tidal wave that came in on Monday night. As a lifelong New Yorker, you kind of feel insulated from natural disasters, but not anymore. We lost both of our cars. I haven't had power or water in almost a week. It's easy to get depressed but then you realize how lucky you are in relation to others. The effect has been pretty amazing. Many people are uniting together to help each other out. Others are driving right through broken red lights without a care in the world. Thankfully, I think I've seen more of the former."

Matt, we are happy you survived; we are always happy when you show up at press conferences, because you always ask sharp and concise questions of the fighters, and that makes our job easier. We keep our fingers crossed for you, and the borough, and all affected by the storm.