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Monday, April 8, 2013
Wallace confidence hits all-time low

By Mike Mazzeo

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Gerald Wallace is struggling mightily with his shot.

The Brooklyn Nets small forward told the New York Post over the weekend that his confidence is "totally gone." He did not talk to reporters after practice Monday.

In the past 15 games, Wallace is shooting 33 percent from the field. Over that span, he connected on just three of 32 3-point attempts (9.4 percent).

Gerald Wallace
Gerald Wallace (left) still brings an abundance of hustle, but his shooting touch has gone missing.
On Saturday night against Charlotte, Wallace attempted just one shot -- a layup on which he was fouled -- in 32 minutes.

"I'm in a situation where I feel like if I miss, I'm going to get pulled out of the game, you know what I'm saying?" Wallace told the newspaper. "So my whole concept is just that you can't come out of the game if you're not missing shots."

"I think I lost the confidence of the coaching staff and my teammates," Wallace continued. "So my main thing is those guys can score, so instead of thinking about it so much, just trying to focus on defense, try to move the ball and get those guys shots."

Deron Williams said Monday he thinks Wallace needs to stop talking about his shooting woes because "it weighs on you.

"You come in every day and you've got to hear about, 'Why are you missing shots?' it's gonna start creeping in your head," Williams said. "That's why I don't like talking about my injuries with you guys."

Interim coach P.J. Carlesimo did not want to discuss Wallace's offensive struggles.

"I just address it with him, not with you guys," Carlesimo said.

Is it fixable?

"Sure. Definitely," Carlesimo responded.

Wallace remains a valuable player for the Nets because of his ability to defend multiple positions, handle the ball as a facilitator and lead by example. But he'd be even more valuable if he could make a jump shot.

During the Bobcats game, Wallace passed up a wide-open 3-pointer from the corner and drove to the basket. As a result, Reggie Evans was called for three seconds.

That kind of turnover can't happen in the postseason.