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Thursday, January 3, 2013
Reese wants JPP to talk to Strahan

By Ohm Youngmisuk

Jason Pierre-Paul was a marked man in 2012 with offenses focused on limiting the monster defensive end.

Pierre-Paul had to deal with double teams, backs and tight ends chipping on him. The result was 10 fewer sacks than the 16.5 he had in 2011.

Jason Pierre-Paul
Jason Pierre-Paul had 10 fewer sacks in 2012 than he had in 2011.
Jerry Reese thinks JPP should talk to Michael Strahan about how to deal with all the extra attention.

"To be a superstar defensive end, a pass rusher in this league, you have to beat those double-team blocks," the GM said in a radio interview on WFAN. "I am going to reach out to Michael Strahan this offseason and see if we can have him have some conversations with JPP and just tell him, look it is inside your chest, a lot of it.

"You’ve got to have the heart to do it, and I think he does," Reese added. "But I think if he hears from somebody like Michael Strahan that will really encourage him."

The entire Giants pass rush was exasperated by the end of the season after recording just 33 sacks and explaining how offenses were countering the rush with quick drop backs and getting the ball out quicker.

But it's nothing the great ones haven't faced before and something Strahan may be able to help Pierre-Paul with.

"After Michael became the superstar defensive end, he was getting double teamed, he was getting chipped but he was still getting sacks," Reese said. "The great ones still get through there and make plays. And he’s got to do that. he can’t give up, like, 'wow, they’re double-teaming me, they’re triple-teaming me, I’m getting chipped, they’re high-lowing me, they’re doing everything to me.'"

Tom Coughlin says his young franchise rusher will benefit from studying the 2012 tape.

"He is still a premier, premier football player and pass rusher," Coughlin said. "He didn’t have the numbers this year the way that he had a year ago but the long arms and the outstanding ability to engage and play the run well as well, this is a big strong kid now.

"He’ll benefit tremendously from studying the way in which people went about their business this year," Coughlin added. "Because it didn’t happen all the time. They don’t chip you on every play, they don’t slide that way on every play. Sometimes you do have that opportunity but you’ve got to be able to take advantage of it when it’s there."