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Friday, October 25, 2013
Big Blue Morning: Checking in on JPP

By Dan Graziano
ESPN.com

Your daily morning check-in on news and notes about and of interest to the New York Giants

The news of the day: Jason Pierre-Paul doesn't always stop to talk to the media, but my goodness did he talk Thursday. For a long time. About his back issues and his poor season. The big-news element of the whole thing was Pierre-Paul's admission that he believes he'll need a full 2014 offseason before he's back to full strength. In my opinion, this starts to feel like the Hakeem Nicks situation all over again, and I wonder if it could end up making Pierre-Paul the Nicks of 2014 -- a guy who'll have to have a prove-it year before the team decides if it wants to give him a long-term contract.

Behind enemy lines: The final test for Michael Vick before he and the Eagles decide he's ready to start at quarterback for the Eagles against the Giants on Sunday? Vick's going to run a 100-yard dash Friday as fast as he can, and if his injured hamstring doesn't give him any trouble, he's going to be good to go. If it does... well, then yeah, the Giants could conceivably face Matt Barkley. Which would be good for the Giants.

Around the division: Robert Griffin III says he thinks the NFL will begin moving away from drop-back passers and toward the kinds of quarterbacks that he himself represents -- mobile ones who can make plays with their legs and give coaches more options as offenses diversify. His theory is that college offenses are moving that way, so they'll produce more of those kinds of players. I can see where he's coming from, but it's still hard to believe that college football is all of a sudden going to start producing more athletes like Griffin -- and especially enough to populate the quarterback rooms of 32 NFL teams.

Around the league: If you laughed as long as I did about Adam Schefter's report that the Rams reached out to Brett Favre, I don't blame you. But Kevin Seifert makes a good point about what the Rams' desperation says about the state of quarterback in the NFL.