New York Giants: tracy porter

Big Blue Morning: Assessing Day 1

March, 12, 2014
3/12/14
8:01
AM ET
In general, I'm not a fan of throwing big money at the top-line, most established free agents out there. Unless you're looking at franchise quarterbacks, NFL careers are too short and players' primes are too fleeting. If you're spending big bucks on a guy who's already done a lot, odds are you'll end up paying for some bad years -- or trying to find a way out of a bad contract.

So in general, I like what the New York Giants did Tuesday on the first day of free agency. I think they still have a lot to do, but the guys they did sign fit a desirable profile when I look at what free agency is at its best. They were looking for players who are somewhat established in the league but still have upside and lots to prove. And I think they may have found it with these three interesting signings:

Guard Geoff Schwartz. A former 16-game starter who's played guard and tackle in the league and only this past year fully recovered from a 2011 hip injury. He was one of the top interior linemen in the league over the second half of 2013 for Kansas City, turns 28 in July and feels like a player on the upswing, the way Evan Mathis was when the Eagles signed him under the radar in 2011. He also has some experience playing tackle, so they could potentially use him there if they decide to rearrange anything with Justin Pugh or Will Beatty.

Running back Rashad Jennings. Hasn't had much opportunity to start in the NFL, but as a result he also has a bit more tread on his tires than your typical 29-year-old running back. The Giants have some underlying numbers to indicate Jennings is capable of big things if given more carries than he's been given at this point in his career. If they choose to rely on him as a starter, he could explode. If David Wilson is viable and they use Jennings as a complementary back, they could find him useful for a long time to come. Another guy who may be ready to take off.

Linebacker O'Brien Schofield. This one's kind of a wild card. Schofield hasn't done much as an outside linebacker in the NFL so far, but he was a pass-rusher in college at Wisconsin and finished second (to Ryan Kerrigan) in the Big Ten in sacks in 2009. So you look at the two-year, $8 million deal and wonder what this guy has done to earn it. But (a) let's see what the contract numbers really look like once we have details and (b) the Giants appear to be trying to pay guys for what they think they will do for them, rather than for what they've done for their former teams. So if they look at Schofield as a player who can contribute to the pass rush, and they plan to use him that way, the money starts to make more sense.

Some other notes:

The Giants also have brought back four of their own free agents -- running back Peyton Hillis, safety Stevie Brown, kicker Josh Brown and cornerback Trumaine McBride. All depth moves, though McBride and/or Brown could end up starting if other things don't work out.

Linebacker Jon Beason remains someone the Giants hope to re-sign, but because he's acting as his own agent, he wasn't allowed to have any contact with teams until 4 p.m. Tuesday (as opposed to noon Saturday, when agents were allowed to talk to teams but players weren't). So Beason is only 17 hours into his market, and he's wise to find out what that market is before just accepting what the Giants have to offer.

Two of the Giants' own free agents left -- defensive tackle Linval Joseph to the Vikings and safety Ryan Mundy to the Bears. As I wrote Tuesday night, I think they'll miss Joseph. At 25, I think he fits the profile of the kind of free agent you look to sign, rather than the kind you let walk out the door. But the Giants didn't feel like spending $6 million a year on a defensive tackle, so Joseph is gone.

With DeMarcus Ware and Julius Peppers getting cut Tuesday, the market for veteran pass-rushers is suddenly flooded with huge names. That would seem to mean Justin Tuck isn't likely to strike gold elsewhere. There was industry sentiment that Tuck won't find enough on the market to convince him to leave the Giants, and that he'd re-sign and try to play out his whole career with the same team. However, Adam Schefter reported late Tuesday that Tuck had a visit scheduled with the Raiders today, and no one has more to spend right now than the Raiders. They're also hosting pass-rusher LaMarr Woodley, but there's nothing to stop them from signing both Woodley and Tuck if they choose. So stay tuned on that.

I still think they need to add a center, and I don't think bringing back Kevin Boothe is the answer. They need to think about long-term solutions on the offensive line, and if Boothe and Chris Snee are two of their starters next year, I don't see how they're doing that. None of the free-agent centers signed Tuesday, though Evan Dietrich-Smith is visiting Tampa Bay today, so he could be off the market soon.

NFL Network reported that cornerback Tracy Porter was in for a visit Tuesday night. Ran back an Eli Manning interception for a touchdown for the Raiders in Week 10 last year. Along with his game-sealing interception touchdown in Super Bowl XLIV, that made him the first player to return both an Eli Manning interception and a Peyton Manning interception for a touchdown. Porter doesn't turn 28 until August and fits that same model of guys who have done something but may be on the cusp of more. He doesn't strike me as the answer if what they wanted was a top corner to pair with Prince Amukamara, but maybe they really see McBride as the outside starter again. I think they should be thinking bigger.

Other needs still to be addressed include wide receiver, tight end, middle linebacker (could be Beason), defensive line (Tuck or his replacement and a low-priced free-agent defensive tackle) and kick returner (could be Jacoby Jones, who's in for a visit Wednesday). The Giants entered the offseason in need of a full-on roster rebuild, and they've only been at it one day. Expect them to continue to be busy.
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- When Sunday dawned here in New Jersey, the New York Giants had played only two games in the past calendar month. They'd won both, and quarterback Eli Manning had not thrown an interception in either of them. These facts, coupled with the schedule quirk that spread out the middle part of the Giants' season so dramatically, served to obscure some significant Giants problems from the narrative that would have them making a miracle run to the NFC East title.

Turnovers, mainly.

Jerrel Jernigan fumbled the opening kickoff and the Raiders recovered it on the five-yard line, then scored two plays later for a gift 7-0 lead with only 46 seconds having run off the clock. Things turned around a bit for the Giants, as Damontre Moore blocked a punt and Cooper Taylor returned it for a tying touchdown and, later, Manning and running back Andre Brown led an 11-play, 90-yard touchdown drive that put them in the lead 14-10.

Brown looks excellent, showing vision and moving the pile and offering the Giants a look at what they've been missing at running back this season. In his first game since breaking his leg in the final week of the preseason, Brown has 65 yards on 14 carries at halftime.

And the Giants' defense has done a fine job making Raiders quarterback Terrelle Pryor move his feet and limiting the damage he does when he runs. Pryor has 21 yards on four carries and has yet to break a big one. More surprising, actually, is the 55 yards running back Rashad Jennings has on his nine carries. But regardless, the Giants have been able to pressure Pryor, and the Raiders' offense (which gets the ball back to start the second half) has yet to find any rhythm.

However.

After Rueben Randle made a great play to pick up a key third down in Giants territory late in the second quarter, Manning threw an inexplicable interception right at Raiders cornerback Tracy Porter, who ran it back for a touchdown and a 17-14 Oakland halftime lead.

So yes, even though just went a full month without throwing one, Manning still leads the NFL with 16 interceptions this season. And the Giants sport a minus-14 turnover ratio. Though they might look like the less lousy of the two lousy teams on this field today, they certainly aren't good enough to win games if they turn the ball over at this rate. If they don't come back and win, they would fall to 2-7 for the season and need to win all of their remaining games to finish with a winning record.

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