Kellen Winslow will rest one day a week

September, 3, 2013
9/03/13
6:15
PM ET
In an attempt to manage chronic pain in Kellen Winslow's surgically repaired right knee, the Jets will put the veteran tight end on the LaRon Landry program -- meaning he'll be allowed to miss one practice per week. That day, Winslow said, will be Wednesday. That's how they did it last year with Landry, who dealt with an Achilles tendon issue and didn't miss a game.

Winslow
Wednesday is a heavy day for game-plan installation, but Winslow said he doesn't see that as an issue because Wednesday is devoted primarily to "regular" personnel. Winslow doesn't have many responsibilities in regular groupings, as he plays mostly in passing personnel packages.

That Winslow made the team is no small accomplishment, considering his knee problems. In training camp, his reps were monitored, and there were times when he sat out two or three days in a row.

This is a nice comeback story. Remember, Winslow arrived in minicamp without a contract and had to audition, as if he were a first-year player. He was basically out of football last season, except for a cup of coffee with the Patriots. Monday marked the one-year anniversary he was released by the Seahawks, and that still bothers him.

"I got a bad deal in Seattle," Winslow said. "It was wrong, but things happen for a reason. It gave me a chance to sit down and reflect on what I've accomplished and, moving forward, what I still want to accomplish."

He said he was "very frustrated" not to garner much interest on the free-agent market. He still feels he's the same player who caught 75 passes in 2011 for the Bucs, the Jets' Week 1 opponent. He was a productive player for the Bucs, but he reportedly clashed with coach Greg Schiano, leading to his trade to the Seahawks. Sunday might be a revenge game for Winslow. He's just happy to have a game, period.

"I'm proud and honored to make the team," he said. "That's a big deal, man."

Rich Cimini

ESPN New York Jets reporter

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.


Insider