New York Knicks: Dwyane Wade

Miami Melo? Less money, more hate

June, 12, 2014
Jun 12
12:30
PM ET


Sources told ESPN.com on Wednesday that the Heat have had internal discussions about pursuing Carmelo Anthony in free agency. Here’s our take on the Heat’s play for Melo:

BIG pay cut: Phil Jackson has stated publicly that he’d like to see Melo take a pay cut to help the Knicks pursue other free agents. Jackson probably was thinking about Anthony taking a pay cut of $2 million to $4 million per season.

If Anthony wants to take his talents to South Beach, he’d have to sacrifice much more than that.

SportsNation

What chance do you give Carmelo Anthony of signing with the Heat next season?

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    21%
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    38%
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    41%

Discuss (Total votes: 4,436)

There are several scenarios in which the Heat can create enough cap space to offer Anthony a sizable contract and re-sign Chris Bosh, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James.

The most plausible scenario has Miami clearing $55 million in cap space to sign all four players. Let’s say they divide that pie evenly.

That would leave Carmelo with a starting salary of $13.8 million on a four-year contract totaling $58.8 million. Signing that kind of deal would force Carmelo to leave more than $70 million on the table.

Why that much?

The max contract Anthony can sign this summer with the Knicks is a five-year, $129 million deal, with a first-year salary of $22.4 million.

If Anthony opted out and signed a max contract with another team this summer, it would be a four-year, $95 million pact with a starting salary of $22.4 million. In that scenario, he’d be accepting a pay cut of $37 million to sign with the Heat.

So either way, Anthony would be taking a significant pay cut to head to South Beach.

That’s one reason, if I were placing a bet on it today, I’d bet against Anthony signing with the Heat.

Yes, he’s close with James, Wade and Bosh -- all of whom were drafted in the same class as Anthony. And yes, he’s said he’d take less money for an opportunity to win. And sure, Miami pulled this off in 2010 when it got Wade, James and Bosh to take less money to team up in South Beach.

But a pay cut of $70 million? That’s asking a lot.

Public enemy No. 1 in NYC: Here’s something else to consider in the Melo-to-Miami move: If Carmelo were to sign with the Heat this summer, he’d probably be one of the most disliked figures in all of New York sports.

It’s one thing to spurn New York and ink a max contract in Houston or Chicago. That alone would leave Knicks fans with a bad taste in their mouths.

But to spurn the Knicks for Miami while leaving $70 million on the table? That would probably be perceived by the Knicks’ fan base as a slap in the face.

Don’t forget, Knicks owner James Dolan (against the wishes of then-GM Donnie Walsh) moved heaven and earth to trade for Anthony in 2011. The package to land Anthony included four rotation players and two first-round draft picks. One of those picks -- the 12th in this year’s draft -- went to Orlando. The second pick will potentially be swapped with Denver in 2016. The Knicks will then send their pick to Toronto as part of the Andrea Bargnani trade.

So the Knicks gave up on a promising present -- and compromised their future -- to land Anthony. If Carmelo heads to Miami in free agency, he’ll have two first-round playoff exits, a second-round playoff exit and a 37-win season on his résumé in New York.

That’s not exactly what Knicks fans envisioned when Anthony arrived in 2011. The sight of him in a Heat jersey probably won’t be easy to swallow for much of the Garden faithful.

Not the end of the world: We don’t think this is going to happen. But if it does, the Knicks won’t be in terrible shape in 2015-16. The 2014-15 season will likely be a waste -- unless you count giving Derek Fisher a season to get acclimated to coaching. But the Knicks will set themselves up for a nice rebuild in the summer of 2015.

New York will have a first-round draft pick and more than $40 million in cap space if Anthony is off the books. Not a bad situation to find yourself in if you are a rebuilding team in a big market.

Question: Do you think Carmelo will end up in Miami? If he left, how would that change your opinion of him?

You can follow Ian Begley on Twitter.

How did the Heat neutralize Novak?

May, 10, 2012
5/10/12
9:45
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MIAMI -- Steve Novak would routinely shoot 4-for-7 in a game from beyond the arc.

But in five games against the Heat, he was a combined 4-for-7. So how can one player go from being so hot, averaging 2.5 makes in 5.2 attempts per game and finishing the regular season with the best 3-point percentage in the NBA (47.2), to being completely neutralized?

"They just didn't give a lot of space," Novak said. "I could tell they were aware of where I was during the majority of the game. I didn't get many good looks, but to their credit they played us well. They close out so quick, they cover ground so fast, so they did a good job."

Interestingly, the Heat were one of worst teams at guarding the long bomb during the regular season (their opponents' 36.3 percentage from downtown was fourth-worst in the league). Why? Because the Heat liked to use their athleticism to over-trap on the perimeter and over-play passing lanes to feast on steals en route to fastbreak points; therefore, that occasionally left shooters open.

But the Heat definitely made sure to key in on Novak, who said that every defender was yelling his name to make sure they knew were he was at all times. That started with Heat coach Erik Spoelstra providing his players a detailed scouting report on how Novak nailed most of his threes, and proceeded with Novak's regular matchup in the series, Dwyane Wade, his former teammate at Marquette, not giving him a sliver of space.

"He has the quickest release I've seen in the league," Spoelstra said. "He hit one the other night in the corner against Dwyane, and Dwyane knows him as well as anybody, so we tried to put him on him in as many matchups as we could. Dwyane was on top of him, and he buried it right in his face in the corner.

"With a guy like that, when you have a little bit more time in the playoffs, you try to take away some of those easy threes that he had been thriving on in April and March, and those were in transition, after timeouts and off offensive rebounds. We tried to take away those and then use our athleticism to get to the rest. But he's a great shooter and he's a great story, that it took this long for him, but he kept on fighting and now he has a real significant role."

Wade called it "cool" to face off against his former college teammate and to have two alums represented in the same series -- a credit, he said, to the extra hours he, Novak and Travis Diener put into the gym. But in the end, Wade didn't want to give his friend any looks. Uncomfortable is what he wanted to make Novak.

"Steve is one of the best shooters in the NBA," Wade said. "All season, when they were very good, he was getting a lot of threes up. He was making four or five threes [per game]. He ended the season with the best 3-point percentage in the league, so we had to make sure every time he came in the game, we were on him.

"I enjoyed covering him. We had fun, little conversations that we were having. I was just guarding him in the corner and I wouldn't let him go nowhere [laughs]. But I'm so happy for Steve because I know how hard he worked and I know the family he comes from, so for me, I'm kind of like the big brother. I'm proud of him. I'm proud of the season he had this year."

The Knicks have to do better homework preparing for the Heat in next year's playoffs, if they face each other, so Novak can get going. But, of course, the big question is: will he be back? While he loves New York, he should attract a lot of interest in free agency starting July 1.

The Knicks will need to convince the unrestricted free agent to sign for less because his value went up this season, even though he lacked a midrange game and disappeared in the playoffs (That also falls on Mike Woodson's playcalling and adjustments.) Novak also has to do a better job of moving off screens like a shooting guard. He has the foot speed, set up and release to play like that position.

Novak admitted he was to work on new ways to get open in the future, but he's overall glad how the season turned out for him.

"They did a good job of guarding me and I think that I just need to be a little bit more aggressive," he said. "I think going forward we learned a lot from this series. There were a lot of good things to come from this series."

You can follow Jared Zwerling on Twitter.

D-Wade messes with Bibby, yet again

May, 9, 2012
5/09/12
2:40
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MIAMI -- While Dwyane Wade said the Heat have had to make more adjustments game to game defensively because of all the Knicks' injuries, they have a bit of an advantage preparing for the opposing starting point guard in Game 5.

That's because Mike Bibby played about half of a season with the Heat last year, after he was traded by the Hawks and then released by the Wizards.

"Yeah, I know a little bit about Mike," Wade said, smiling, Wednesday morning at American Airlines Arena. "I know Mike has made more shots in this series than he made all last year. Send that to Mike [laughs]."

Wade was being a bit tongue-in-cheek, but if you asked him about Bibby right after Game 4, his mood probably would've been a little different. That's because Bibby's clutch 3-point shooting helped keep the Knicks ahead in the game down the stretch. With 1:08 left in the third quarter, he put the Knicks ahead 62-58, and with 1:23 remaining in the fourth, he put the team up 84-81.

That wasn't the first time Wade gave Bibby a hard time. Rewind to Game 2. With the score tied at 29 with 9:42 remaining in the second quarter, Wade and Bibby got tied up underneath the basket during a rebound opportunity. That led to Wade's signature Jordan Brand sneakers stepping on, and removing in the process, one of Bibby's shoes from the same company.

Bibby didn't realize it at first, but Wade did looking down. That's when the Heat All-Star actually picked it up and threw it to his team's bench. Bibby looked at him stunned, as Wade gave him a blank (but playful) stare as he backpedaled to the other end of the court.

However, Bibby, who was Wade's teammate last season, didn't appear to be amused, because the Knicks proceeded up the court (with no clock stoppage), and the situation further delayed his ability to get back on offense.

"Yeah, I surprised him," Wade said, smiling, during his postgame press conference. "I don't think many people have done that before [laughs]."

One local reporter was dying to know, D-Wade, where did the play rank among your favorite in the game?

"[laughs] I don't know. I've never done that before, but it was fun," Wade said. "A little messing with Mike. We're both with the same brand, too, so I told him he should have my shoe on. That's why I threw it. But it's cool. All good, all fun."

There was no comment from Bibby afterwards because he had already left for the team bus when the media arrived in the visiting locker room.

You can follow Jared Zwerling on Twitter.

Melo on friends LBJ and Wade: All business

May, 5, 2012
5/05/12
5:06
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GREENBURGH, N.Y. -- In between the practices and games, the Knicks and Heat haven't been going anywhere. The away team has been stationed in the other's city for about three days at a time.

So, does that mean Carmelo Anthony is hanging out with his good pals LeBron James and Dwyane Wade?

Not at all. In fact, they're not even communicating off the court during the first-round series.

"Nah, it's business. It's straight business right now," Melo said. "I really don't think there's any need to text right now. We're trying to win; they're trying to win. Tomorrow's a big day for both. I haven't heard from them at all."

You can follow Jared Zwerling on Twitter.

Melo: Heat throw 'everything at you'

May, 4, 2012
5/04/12
12:57
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Again and again this series, LeBron James has referred to Carmelo Anthony a "great player."

But on the court, James has made him look like anything but.

Led by James' efforts on defense, the Heat held Anthony to 22 points on 7-for-23 shooting in its blowout Game 3 win.

Anthony went 1-for-4 from beyond the arc and had five turnovers on the evening as New York fell behind, 3-0, in the series.

"We tried to make is as tough on him as possible," Dwyane Wade said. "We tried to wear on him for 48 minutes."

Mission accomplished.

Miami forced Anthony into some poor shots, seemingly contesting everything. He went 4-for-12 in the first half and through three quarters, he was 5-for-19.

"They just tried to make it hard for me, make my catches hard out there," Anthony said. "(They) beat me up as much as they can. I heard the bench yelling, 'Keep beating him up, keep bearing him up.' They throw everything at you."

And they've been doing it all series.

Anthony's shooting 34 percent from the floor in the three games against Miami, scoring 21 points per game, a far cry from the production he gave the Knicks in April. That version of 'Melo won Eastern Conference Player of the Month by scoring 29.8 points per game on 49.5 percent shooting.

"He's played some great basketball his whole life," James said. "We understand that he's a very big focal point of their team and we have to be in tune with him throughout the game for 48 minutes.... We just try to make it tough on him."

They've made it much more than tough in this series.

Using a combination of double-teams, hard fouls and strong contests, the Heat forced Anthony into a 3-for-15 Game 1 and 12-for-26 Game 2.

Anthony hoped things would be different on Thursday night.

Hours before tip off, he claimed that he'd have to carry the offensive load, and carry it well, for New York to compete against mighty Miami. And he was comfortable with that challenge.

"For us to win, or have a chance to win, I've got to go out and be great tonight," Anthony said after the team's shoot around.

Funny thing is, everything seemed to be lined up for Anthony to have a big night.

He was starting at power forward in place of the injured Amare Stoudemire, the position he'd enjoyed so much success in during his run in April. And, maybe more importantly, he was taking the court without Stoudemire, the player with whom he's had so many chemistry issues during his tenure in New York.

But it didn't happen.

Anthony couldn't get his shot to fall early on. He missed four of his first five and had two turnovers in the first nine minutes on Thursday. And it seemed to snowball from there.

"That's what they're defensive schemes are all about," Anthony said, "To get the ball out of my hands and stop me, basically make it hard on me out there."

With Thursday's loss, Anthony fell to 0-7 as a Knick in the playoffs. He's been on the floor for more than half of the franchise's NBA record 13 straight postseason losses.

In his career, Anthony is just 16-36 in the playoffs. That's the lowest wining percentage among players who've averaged at least 20 points per game and have played in at least 10 playoff games.

Of course, it's unfair to put all of the blame for the Knicks' struggles on Anthony's doorstep. From untimely injuries, to poor bench play, there's plenty of reasons why the Knicks are where they are in this series.

And Anthony's the only reason the Knicks had a puncher's chance coming into the playoffs.

"Melo's a great player, man," James said late Thursday night, repeating the Heat's party line.

No one's arguing that.

But Anthony had to be great on Thursday for the Knicks to have a chance.

And, once again, the Heat forced him to look anything but.

Dwyane Wade to Mike Bibby: Wear my shoe!

May, 1, 2012
5/01/12
12:47
PM ET
MIAMI -- With the score tied at 29 with 9:42 remaining in the second quarter of Game 2, Mike Bibby and Dwyane Wade got tied up underneath the basket during a rebound opportunity. That led to Wade's signature Jordan Brand sneakers stepping on, and removing in the process, one of Bibby's shoes from the same company.

Bibby didn't realize it at first, but Wade did looking down. That's when the Heat All-Star actually picked it up and threw it to his team's bench. Bibby looked at him stunned, as Wade gave him a blank (but playful) stare as he backpedaled to the other end of the court.

However, Bibby, who was Wade's teammate last season, didn't appear to be amused, because the Knicks proceeded up the court (with no clock stoppage), and the situation further delayed his ability to get back on offense.

"Yeah, I surprised him," Wade said, smiling, during his postgame press conference. "I don't think many people have done that before [laughs]."

One local reporter was dying to know, D-Wade, where did the play rank among your favorite in the game?

"[laughs] I don't know. I've never done that before, but it was fun," Wade said. "A little messing with Mike. We're both with the same brand, too, so I told him he should have my shoe on. That's why I threw it. But it's cool. All good, all fun."

There was no comment from Bibby afterwards because he had already left for the team bus when the media arrived in the visiting locker room.

You can follow Jared Zwerling on Twitter.

Matchup: Shumpert vs. Wade

April, 27, 2012
4/27/12
1:25
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Melo vs. LeBron | Chandler vs. Anthony | Amare vs. Bosh | Bench vs. Bench

Davis vs. Chalmers | Shumpert vs. Wade

WHERE SHUMPERT CAN EXCEL: One-on-one defense. Mike Woodson has even said this season the rookie "changes the game from a defensive standpoint." Iman Shumpert's defense -- he finished the regular season second among rookies in steals per game (1.7) -- is particularly dominant in two areas. It starts on the perimeter, where he swarms the ball carrier like a killer bee, taking advantage of his 6-5, 220-pound frame. His constantly-moving hands, especially, make things difficult for his defender. His furious defense is able to disrupt his opponent's dribble and sight lines to make rapid-fire passes. As a result, Dwyane Wade may play a bit more cautiously and his lack of visibility could slow down the Heat's ball movement at times, which would give the Knicks' team defense an advantage because the players would have a better lock on who they're guarding. Second, Shumpert is a great help defender who has the athleticism to drop down on the offensive post player and then quickly rotate back to his defender after the pass back out is made. Overall, there is never a delayed response from Shumpert. He's relentless, seems to always be aware of what's going on and he's never a step behind. His matchup with Wade, a fellow Chicagoan, should fire him up even more, which it did back on April 15. He was able to get under Wade's skin, forcing the All-Star into six turnovers. Also keep in mind, Wade will likely not be 100 percent to start the series. He's still recovering from a dislocated left index index, suffered earlier in the week.

WHERE SHUMPERT MAY STRUGGLE: Of course, Wade is still Wade, one of the top five players in the NBA. Even though Shumpert's defense is his best ingredient, Wade will get his at different times during the game, because he's that good. Shumpert will obviously has his hands full, especially in two main areas. First, Wade is very crafty off of pick-and-rolls and he can split them in a blink of an eye (just like another Chicagoan, Derrick Rose). From there, Wade is explosive enough to get to the rim in two dribbles and soar in for the dunk. Second, Wade has improved his post-up game this season, which is a credit to working with Miami-based trainer Ed Downs starting in the offsesaon. Overall, Downs helped Wade strengthen his moves and his patented spinning fadeaway shot out of the post. What Downs did was this: In a criss-cross pattern, Down applied resistance bands from Wade’s right wrist to left knee and his left wrist to right knee, with bands between his ankles, in order to simulate a defender bumping him on the block. The first day Wade went through the exercise, he stayed in the gym 40 minutes longer than his designated workout time to fight through the added pressure, and he finally mastered it. Downs said that even during an exercise where he had Wade shooting leaning back while standing on one leg on a balanced disc, he made more baskets than being flat-footed. So that just goes to show you how good Wade is. Most importantly, Shumpert will have to make sure to stay on his feet. Wade has one of the best ball fakes in the game after he makes a stepback move.

ADVANTAGE: Heat. Because even a slightly less than 100 percent Flash is still a dangerous player. Let's not forget, as well, that Wade is a great defender himself (he averaged 1.7 steals per game this season). And because it's Shumpert's first playoff experience, Wade, with his seven postseason appearances (not to mention, a championship in 2006), has the potential to take the rookie out of his game and get him into early foul trouble. That wouldn't be good, because Shumpert will also be needed at times on LeBron James.

D-Wade plays playground hoops in NYC

April, 17, 2012
4/17/12
9:32
AM ET
Shortly after walking off the Madison Square Garden floor with a win on Sunday afternoon, Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade stepped onto a court in a Manhattan playground for an impromptu shootaround with about a half-dozen kids.

A picture posted on his Twitter account shows Wade, dressed in a shirt, tie and wearing sneakers, shooting around at the Vesuvio Playground between Spring and Prince Streets.

Click here to see what Wade tweeted from his account (@DwyaneWade) in what he called the "Coolest moment of the day."

And that's saying something, considering Wade went to Yankee Stadium after the Knicks game and sat next to Jets QB Tim Tebow. Wade was booed at first, before flashing a Yankee cap to the crowd. Tebow was greeted with a loud mixture of boos and cheers.

Melo doesn't need $ to play in Olympics

April, 13, 2012
4/13/12
2:40
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Dwyane Wade said on Wednesday that players should be 'compensated' for playing in the Olympics. He then backed off of those comments on Thursday, issuing a statement that said, "I do not want to be paid to go to the Olympics."

Fellow Olympian Carmelo Anthony disagrees with Wade's first take on Olympic compensation. He doesn't need to be paid to play for Team USA.

"I've been dealing with the USA team since I was 16, and I haven't gotten paid yet. And it's been good to me," said Anthony, who hadn't heard Wade's comments until they were relayed by a reporter and clearly meant no disrespect to the Miami Heat guard. "Everybody has their own opinion about it. It don't matter to me if I get a check or not. I'm still going to go play."

Anthony and Wade will most likely be teammates when Team USA attempts to win a second straight gold medal this summer in London.

"I want to play. This is bigger than anything," Anthony said. "Especially this time around for us to go over there to try to redeem ourselves and try to get that gold once again, this is a big one.

"And it's London, who doesn't want to go to London?"

Earlier this week, Wade told reporters, ""It's a lot of things you do for the Olympics -- a lot of jerseys you sell. We play the whole summer. I do think guys should be compensated. Just like I think college players should be compensated as well. Unfortunately, it's not there. But I think it should be something, you know, there for it."

He backed off of those comments on Thursday, saying on Twitter that he didn't want to be paid to play in the Olympics.

Tyson Chandler could join Anthony and Wade in London this summer. He's on the 18-player list of finalists for the team. Former Knicks head coach Mike D'Antoni will be an assistant.

You can follow Ian Begley on Twitter.

D-Wade on Novak: 'I'm so happy for him'

March, 19, 2012
3/19/12
8:38
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Nine years ago, Knicks sharpshooter Steve Novak and All-Star Dwyane Wade were teaming up to lead Marquette to the Final Four, where the Eagles lost in the semifinals.

Wade's future in the NBA was clearly defined at the time; he was one of the best college players in the country, averaging 21.5 points per game as a junior in 2003. Novak, however, was still a freshman with an undetermined path to the pros.

As Wade went on to win an NBA title in 2006 with the Heat and develop into a superstar, Novak, who was drafted in 2006, was bouncing around from city to city. For his first five years in the league, Novak played for four different teams: the Rockets, Clippers, Mavericks and Spurs.

AP Photo/Al BehrmanDwyane Wade and Steve Novak -- shown here, flanking Joe Chapman -- were members of Marquette's Final Four team in 2003.


Finally, not only has Novak become a prominent fixture in New York, he's become a popular name around the world in the wake of Linsanity -- even trending worldwide on Twitter. And D-Wade, his former Golden Eagles teammate, couldn't be more proud.

"I'm happy for him," Wade told ESPNNewYork.com. "I know the tough time he had earlier in his career, not playing as many minutes, going to different teams. At one point, it looked like he might not be in the league and then now he's found himself a home.

"And even if he hadn't found a home, he's made a name for himself, Mr. Discount Double Check [an ode to NFL MVP Aaron Rodgers' touchdown celebration]. He's doing a great job, so as a former teammate, but more so just knowing Steve and his family, I'm so happy for him."

Wade said he and Novak will be forever linked to each other and Marquette because of what they accomplished together in 2003. Even today, they're both still very close to their alma mater. Wade catches games there even during the NBA season, when the Heat is visiting Milwaukee, and Novak trains on campus during the offseason, like he did last year. Wade said their Final Four run was "stuff that coaches dream of."

"I'm sure for coach [Tom] Crean [who's now at Indiana], to look back and tune into that game and see two of his former players playing on the court at the same time in a very big game, was a dream for him," Wade said. "So us as teammates and competitive, man, we love it and when we go back to Marquette, when we go back to those moments, we're always going to be linked together.

"The Final Four is always going to be celebrated at Marquette, so we always go back and talk about those moments, even when our playing days are over."

One thing Wade will always be talking about is Novak's shooting ability -- he calls Novak's 3-point shot "a flamethrower." In fact, Novak's shooting was the first thing he marveled about when he saw Novak's high school recruiting tapes. From that point on, Wade always knew Novak's outside touch, in addition to his 6-10 height, would enable him to play at the next level.

"Seeing how easy it was for him to shoot the 3-ball, it was like unbelievable," Wade said. "I mean, I struggled to shoot the 3, but he was shooting it like it was a layup. Just coming in his freshman year, man, he put in the work, even though he already had a flamethrower.

"He was always in the gym, him, myself and [Travis] Diener. We spent a lot of time together in the gym. I couldn't shoot as well as those guys, but I enjoyed being in the games with them, tried to compete. If I won one, it was the greatest moment in my life at the time. It goes to show you how much work [Steve] put in and now it's paying off."

Looking ahead, Novak's long-range marksmanship just needs to pay off on April 15 at the Garden -- the last time the Knicks and Heat face each other this season -- and if, and when, they meet in the playoffs.

Information from ESPN.com's Tom Haberstroh was used in this report.

You can follow Jared Zwerling on Twitter.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

TEAM LEADERS

POINTS
Carmelo Anthony
PTS AST STL MIN
27.4 3.1 1.2 38.7
OTHER LEADERS
ReboundsC. Anthony 8.1
AssistsP. Prigioni 3.5
StealsI. Shumpert 1.2
BlocksA. Bargnani 1.2