New York Mets: Alex Rodriguez

Morning Briefing: Check-in, now checkup

February, 16, 2014
Feb 16
6:32
AM ET
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla.


Adam RubinChris Young arrives at Mets camp Saturday for the first time.


FIRST PITCH: Mets pitchers and catchers take physicals on Sunday. They then engage in the first official workout of spring training on Monday morning.

A team official did not expect any players to be delayed by visa issues or otherwise.

Outfielder Chris Young was among those who arrived at the complex for the first time Saturday. Curtis Granderson and Matt Harvey are likely to address the media Sunday.

Sunday’s news reports:

Bartolo Colon, who signed a two-year, $20 million deal with the Mets in early December, said the club was the only organization to offer him a multiyear deal.

Writes columnist Ken Davidoff in the Post, making reference to Colon’s 50-game suspension in 2012 for testing positive for abnormal testosterone levels:

As he essentially tries to replace the injured Matt Harvey, Colon brings risk -- that his unorthodox physique finally will surrender to common sense, or he will get caught using illegal performance-enhancing drugs for a second time. Colon failed a drug test in 2012, and it turned out he acquired the offending testosterone from the renowned Anthony Bosch -- demerit to Colon for apparently not following Bosch’s test-beating advice as diligently as did Alex Rodriguez.

He brings wisdom, too. The soft-spoken Colon won’t be working as Dan Warthen’s associate pitching coach. None of his new teammates will probably become great friends with him. Yet they can watch and learn from this master of movement, command and self-control.

Omar Minaya, meanwhile, reiterated to Tim Rohan in the Times he “of course” would make the June 27, 2002 trade with the Cleveland Indians again that dealt then-prospects Cliff Lee, Brandon Phillips and Grady Sizemore away and brought Colon to Minaya’s Montreal Expos.

Read more in the Daily News, Star-Ledger, Newsday and MLB.com.

• Steve Serby in the Post has a Q&A with Noah Syndergaard. One exchange:

Q: You wrote the word “Lion” on your glove one time.

A: Yeah, I feel like just putting your name on a glove is kinda boring, so I just put random stuff on it, like I put Lion, just to be the lion on the mound, and then I have another glove that has “Drago” written on it [after “Rocky IV” villain Ivan Drago], and my two others have “Rick Grimes”and “Heisenberg” from two of my favorite shows, “Breaking Bad” and “Walking Dead.”

• Mike Puma in the Post reports the Mets would be willing to offer Stephen Drew a one-year contract with an option, but Scott Boras’ asking price “hasn’t dropped enough recently for the Mets to consider themselves serious suitors.” Sandy Alderson has been clear in saying signing Drew is unlikely.

Kyle Farnsworth offered his thoughts about joining the Mets. Read more in the Post, Daily News, Star-Ledger and Newsday.

• The Mets seriously discussed trading Jose Reyes to the Texas Rangers during the 2003-04 offseason for Alfonso Soriano, but the Rangers owner halted those talks, writes Joel Sherman in the Post. It came just after Soriano was acquired from the Yankees for Alex Rodriguez.

Aaron Harang, who finished last season with the Mets, joined the Indians on a minor-league deal. Read more in the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

• Phil Mushnick in the Post is unimpressed with the Mets’ $10 “UltiMet” offering.

• Marc Carig in Newsday suggests “the Mets did import some talent this offseason, but they also left several glaring holes unfilled.”

• Danny Anderson, the St. Lucie Mets clubhouse staffer whom David Wright and other players had a Super Bowl party to rally around, died of cancer Thursday, writes TCPalm.com.

From the bloggers … Faith and Fear in Flushing sorts through a slew of responses to its question regarding which Mets postseason most merits cosmetic reconstructive surgery. … John Delcos at Mets Report lists five questions Terry Collins must answer this spring.

BIRTHDAYS: Former Mets infielder Bill Pecota was born on this date in 1960.

TWEET OF THE DAY: YOU’RE UP: What will Bartolo Colon’s record and ERA be in 2014?

Morning Briefing: D-Day for A-Rod, etc.

August, 5, 2013
8/05/13
8:15
AM ET

Drew Hallowell/Getty ImagesIt's Biogenesis suspension day for the Trenton Thunder's Alex Rodriguez and others.
NEW YORK

FIRST PITCH: After losing a rubber game to the Kansas City Royals on Sunday to drop to 1-4 since staying intact at the trade deadline, the Mets take a day off Monday.

It’s Biogenesis suspension day, although Alex Rodriguez reportedly will appeal MLB's planned suspension through the 2014 season, allowing him to play tonight at the Chicago White Sox and creating a circus atmosphere.

Cesar Puello, the Mets prospect implicated by “Outside the Lines” as having a connection to Biogenesis, has been held out of the Double-A Binghamton starting lineup for four straight games, although Paul DePodesta would only describe it as a managerial decision.

Puello, a 22-year-old right fielder, is hitting .328 with 16 homers and 73 RBIs in 329 at-bats with the B-Mets. He is on the 40-man roster, so he receives the major league protections specified in the collective bargaining agreement.

The Mets do have some off-day decisions to make:

Bobby Parnell, who has been unable to pitch since last Tuesday, is due for a reexamination of his troublesome neck. Given a 15-day disabled-list stint can be backdated to Parnell’s last usage, DLing Parnell may have to be a consideration.

Of course, that leads to the question: Who would close minus Parnell? David Aardsma blew a save chance Friday, then surrendered a homer in the 12th the following day.

The Mets also have to sort out how to cover third base during David Wright’s absence. Options include: Moving Daniel Murphy to third base (and Eric Young Jr. to second), as well as using Josh Satin or Justin Turner there, or promoting Wilmer Flores from Triple-A Las Vegas. Flores suddenly has started two straight games at third base for the 51s, after starting there only once earlier in the season (April 15).

Flores, who turns 22 on Tuesday, belted his 15th homer of the season Sunday at Memphis. He is hitting .322 and has a Pacific Coast League-leading 86 RBIs.

Meanwhile, when play resumes Tuesday, the Mets welcome the Colorado Rockies to Citi Field. The pitching probable:

Tuesday: Jenrry Mejia (1-1, 2.08) vs. RHP Tyler Chatwood (7-4, 3.15), 7:10 p.m.

Wednesday: Matt Harvey (8-3, 2.21) vs. RHP Chad Bettis (0-1, 9.00), 7:10 p.m.

Thursday: Dillon Gee (7-8, 3.97) vs. Jhoulys Chacin (10-5, 3.40), 12:10 p.m.

Monday’s news reports:

Marlon Byrd lost two fly balls in the sun, Zack Wheeler had a pair of wild pitches and John Buck had a passed ball in a three-run fifth by the Royals en route to a 6-2 win against the Mets on Sunday. Wheeler lost about 3 mph on his fastball when he got into trouble, potentially from trying to aim the ball. Terry Collins afterward told Wheeler he needed to step up and pick up his teammates after the miscues in right field. The Mets had been 5-0 in Wheeler’s July starts.

Writes columnist Larry Brooks in the Post:

It was sunny when the visitors from Kansas City were in the field, too, but Mets manager Terry Collins said: “We unfortunately couldn’t hit the ball that high to get their right fielder involved.”

Seriously, he said that.

Read game recaps in the Post, Daily News, Times, Newsday, Star-Ledger, Journal, Record and MLB.com.

• Lefty reliever Tim Byrdak, like Pedro Feliciano on the comeback trail, has been promoted to Las Vegas. Byrdak, 39, went 1-1 with a 2.19 ERA in 14 appearances spanning 12 1/3 innings with Class A St. Lucie. He allowed six hits and walked seven. Lefty batters were 1-for-12 with a walk against him. Byrdak underwent surgery on Sept. 6, 2012 to repair a torn anterior capsule in his left shoulder.

• Read more on the third-base options in the Post, Daily News, Star-Ledger, Record and Newsday.

• Rafael Montero allowed one run in eight innings and Las Vegas beat Cards prospect Michael Wacha at Memphis, 4-2. Jordany Valdespin went 2-for-4 in his return from a three-game suspension. Noah Syndergaard tossed five scoreless innings and combined with Armando Rodriguez and Ryan Fraser on a three- hit shutout as Binghamton blanked Harrisburg, 6-0. Rainy Lara allowed four runs in seven innings and Lucas Duda went 0-for-4 as Clearwater beat St. Lucie, 5-2. Greenville's five-run eighth against Shawn Teufel and Beck Wheeler resulted in an 8-6 Savannah loss. Kingsport was drubbed, 17-1, by Greeneville. Martires Arias and Edioglis Villasmil allowed seven earned runs apiece. Jamestown beat Brooklyn, 9-5, despite LJ Mazzilli's first professional homer.

• The Cyclones had five players selected to the Aug. 13 New York-Penn League All-Star Game at Thomas J. Dodd Stadium in Norwich, Conn. Right-hander Miller Diaz will start for the National League squad. Also selected: right-handers John Gant and Robert Gsellman, left-hander John Mincone and Mazzilli.

• Brendan Prunty in the Star-Ledger chronicles Feliciano’s three-year journey to return to the majors. Feliciano has retired all four batters he has faced -- all lefties -- since returning Friday.

• Barry Federovitch at NJ.com insists the Mets cannot bring back Ike Davis in 2014.

From the bloggers … Rising Apple suggests that while Davis’ overall numbers are poor, his numbers since his return from Triple-A are fine. … John Delcos at Mets Report offers a plan to use Flores.

BIRTHDAYS: John Olerud turns 45.

TWEET OF THE DAY: YOU’RE UP: How should the Mets handle third base in David Wright’s absence?

Mets' tweet tweaks A-Rod?

July, 22, 2013
7/22/13
5:59
PM ET

Via Mets on twitter
Did the New York Mets take a veiled shot at A-Rod with a tweet from their official account Monday afternoon before deleting it?

Along with a photo of the Mets stretching pregame Monday, the tweet read: "Don't forget to stretch those quads."

Rodriguez's comeback was sidetracked this weekend by a Grade 1 quadriceps tear.

Team spokesman Jay Horwitz said the employee who sent out the tweet was unaware of A-Rod's quad situation and how the Mets' language would be inferred. Horwitz added no ill-will was intended.

OTL: Puello among suspension candidates

June, 4, 2013
6/04/13
8:03
PM ET

Adam RubinCesar Puello reportedly may face an MLB suspension.


WASHINGTON -- Major League Baseball will move to suspend roughly 20 players linked to the Miami-area clinic ensnared in a performance-enhancing drug scandal after gaining cooperation from Biogenesis of America founder Tony Bosch, "Outside the Lines" reports.

While Alex Rodriguez and Ryan Braun are big names identified in the report, the Mets' Double-A outfielder Cesar Puello also is a suspension candidate, the report states.

Puello, 22, entered today's play hitting .302 with eight homers and 33 RBIs in 169 at-bats with the B-Mets.

When Puello first was linked to Biogenesis by ESPN in February, he said without taking questions: "All the questions [should] go to the Players' Association. I'm here for play[ing] baseball. And we can talk about baseball. I've got to go work."

Read the news story here.

Series preview: Mets vs. Yankees

May, 27, 2013
5/27/13
12:58
AM ET

Anthony Gruppuso/USA TODAY SportsMariano Rivera, 43, makes his final regular-season visit to Citi Field this series.
METS (18-29, fourth place/NL East) vs. NEW YORK YANKEES (30-19, first place/AL East)

Monday: LHP Jonathon Niese (3-5, 4.80) vs. RHP Phil Hughes (2-3, 5.51), 7:10 p.m. ET

Tuesday: RHP Matt Harvey (5-0, 1.93) vs. RHP Hiroki Kuroda (6-3, 2.67), 7:10 p.m. ET

Wednesday: RHP Jeremy Hefner (0-5, 4.76) vs. RHP David Phelps (3-2, 3.96), 7:05 p.m. ET

Thursday: RHP Dillon Gee (2-6, 6.34) vs. LHP Vidal Nuno (1-1, 1.93), 7:05 p.m. ET

Yankees short hops

• Retiring Mariano Rivera makes his final regular-season visit to Citi Field. He has converted 18 straight save chances to open the season, the second-longest streak of his career. Rivera saved his first 28 opportunities in 2008. With a perfect 11th inning Saturday, Rivera matched Dennis Eckersley for fourth on the all-time games-pitched list at 1,071. The only pitchers with more appearances happen to all have appeared for the Mets: Jesse Orosco (1,252), Mike Stanton (1,178) and John Franco (1,119).

Curtis Granderson broke a pinkie and landed on the disabled list this weekend. The Yankees recalled Brennan Boesch from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.


G Fiume/Getty ImagesLyle Overbay has filled in well for Mark Teixeira at first base.


Granderson suffered the latest in a rash of injuries to high-profile players. Also on the DL: Derek Jeter (left ankle surgery), Mark Teixeira (torn ECU sheath, right arm), Alex Rodriguez (left hip surgery), Kevin Youkilis (lumbar spine sprain), Francisco Cervelli (broken right hand), Eduardo Nunez (left oblique strain), Andy Pettitte (strained left trapezius muscle) and Joba Chamberlain (right oblique strain).

The Yankees have received stellar fill-in performances, including from first baseman Lyle Overbay for Teixeira. Overbay -- who was signed hours after being released by the Boston Red Sox late in spring training -- has three homers to give the Yanks the lead in the seventh inning or later this season. But he will recede from a starting role with Teixeira expected to return next weekend.

Teixeira is a switch-hitter, which should not provide much opportunity at first base for Overbay. And Overbay is unlikely to unseat Travis Hafner at DH against right-handed pitching. Teixeira has started playing in extended spring training games and is due for a midweek rehab assignment with Double-A Trenton.

Youkilis, who has been out since departing with a lower-back injury on April 9, played in an extended spring training game Saturday. He is due to repeat that activity Monday. Youkilis could join Teixeira with Trenton on Wednesday.

Pettitte will throw a 75-pitch simulated game on Tuesday in Tampa. He should reenter the Yankees' rotation no later than next Monday.

Chamberlain has started throwing in extended spring training games.

• Long man Adam Warren was a college teammate of Matt Harvey's at the University of North Carolina.

• Rookie David Adams (.300), a third-round pick in 2008 from the University of Virginia, has stepped in nicely at third base for Youkilis and is considered the best homegrown infielder since Robinson Cano.

Hiroki Kuroda and David Phelps both are optimistic about starting against the Mets, despite issues in their last starts. Kuroda -- who is due to face Harvey at Citi Field and has been the Yanks' top starter this season -- was struck on the calf by a liner off the bat of Manny Machado in Baltimore. Phelps took a line drive off his right forearm against the Rays.

• Rookie left-hander Vidal Nuno, who was released by the Cleveland Indians at the end of spring training in 2011, is keeping his rotation spot even after the return of Ivan Nova from the DL. With Nuno's success, Nova made only his 12th relief appearance in 178 professional games Saturday, in his return from the DL after recovering from a right triceps injury. Nova loaded the bases against the Rays but escaped.

• The Yankees claimed left-handed reliever David Huff off waivers from Cleveland and designated for assignment seldom-used backup outfielder Ben Francisco, who was hitting. 114. Huff, who is stretched out for a multi-inning performance if required, was struck in the head by a line drive off the bat of A-Rod in 2010.

• Catcher Chris Stewart was held out Sunday because of continued nagging from a groin injury suffered last week.

• Ex-Mariner Shawn Kelley had struck out 33 batters in 19 2/3 innings.

Toxicology report -- bad MLB contracts

September, 25, 2012
9/25/12
8:18
AM ET

US Presswire
Vernon Wells, Juan Uribe and Chone Figgins (l to r) are among the bloated contracts around Major League Baseball.
The Mets’ first task this offseason regarding Jason Bay, and for that matter Johan Santana, likely should be to see if any team has trade interest. A swap appears unlikely, though, even discounting the no-trade clause each possesses.

After all, Bay is hitting .155 with eight homers in 187 at-bats. And he is owed $19 million next season including a 2014 buyout, making it a toxic contract.

Similarly, Santana -- despite the June 1 no-hitter -- finishes the season on the DL after allowing six-plus runs in each of his final five starts. Santana is owed $31 million next season including a ’14 buyout.

Still, if the Mets were to find another team with toxic contracts to swap, who is logical? With the help of reporters around baseball, here’s a look …

THEY’VE GOT POTENTIAL

Angels: “Oh, you've come to the right place,” our friend who covers the Angels says. “The Angels have the deadest of dead weight -- Vernon Wells. The Angels are paying Wells $21 million this year to be their fourth outfielder. They owe him $21 million more in 2013 and again in 2014.”

Blue Jays: Left fielder/first baseman Adam Lind (.240, 10 HR, 40 RBIs) is owed $5 million in 2013. With buyouts of option years, the minimum owed is $7 million. “He cleared waivers at one point this season and the Blue Jays would love to get rid of his contract -- even though it's unlikely that can happen,” a team observer said.

Braves: Second baseman Dan Uggla (.215, 19 HR, 73 RBIs) is owed $39 million over the next three seasons.

Cubs: Alfonso Soriano ($18 million apiece in 2013 and ’14) and Carlos Marmol ($9.8 million next season) are the remaining sizable contracts.

Dodgers: The Dodgers inherited Carl Crawford ($102.5 million through 2017) and Josh Beckett ($31.5 million through 2014) while acquiring Adrian Gonzalez, but both should contribute. The least-productive contract: Juan Uribe, who finally pinch hit Sunday after going unused for nearly a month. Uribe, with one year remaining, is still owed $8 million.

Mariners: Left fielder Chone Figgins (.183, 2 HR, 11 RBIs) is owed $8 million next season. Center fielder Franklin Gutierrez (.258, 4 HR, 14 RBIs) is owed $7.5 million in 2013 with a buyout of the following season. Says one observer: “Gutierrez has been hurt or sick for most of his deal and might produce if ever healthy. Figgins is literally dead weight.” Bay does live in the offseason in Seattle. And the combined $15.5 million owed to those two are close to Bay's $19 million.

Marlins: Heath Bell has two years, $18 million guaranteed remaining. He also has a $9 million option for 2015 based on games finished -- 55 the previous season or 100 combined in 2013 and '14. (The Mets have been down that route before.)

Pirates: Clint Barmes is signed for 2013 at $5.5 million. He's hitting .228/.266/.325 with eight homers.

Red Sox: John Lackey (12-12, 6.41 ERA) has two years left for a combined $30.5 million, with a 2015 club option at the major league minimum because of a preexisting elbow injury.

Twins: Nick Blackburn (4-9, 7.39 ERA) and middle infielder Tsuyoshi Nishioka -- both relegated to the minors -- are under contract for 2013 and “practically sunken cost.” Blackburn is owed $5.5 million. Nishioka is owed $3.25 million including a 2014 buyout. The Twins likely would never trade Joe Mauer, despite him being owed $23 million annually through 2018.

Yankees: Alex Rodriguez to Flushing? Don't hold your breath. Still, A-Rod is owed $114 million over the next five seasons. Mark Teixeira and CC Sabathia could emerge as bad contracts, with $90 million over four seasons and $119 million over five seasons owed, respectively.

(Read full post)

Rapid Reaction: Yankees 4, Mets 3

June, 23, 2012
6/23/12
10:31
PM ET


Recap | Box score | Photos

WHAT IT MEANS: Little Jerry Seinfeld may be the chicken, but it was the Mets who laid an egg in the seventh inning as the Yankees rallied to win 4-3 on Saturday before a Citi Field-record crowd of 42,122.

Chris Young had breezed through six innings, blanking the Yankees while allowing only two hits. Things then unraveled quickly.

With the Mets leading 3-0 thanks to an RBI single by Young that chased Ivan Nova the previous half-inning, Young walked Mark Teixeira to open the seventh.

Nick Swisher followed by sending a sinking line drive to right field. Lucas Duda initially stepped backward. He changed direction too late. Not only did the catchable ball drop in front of Duda, it also skipped by the novice right fielder. Swisher was credited with a double.

Raul Ibañez then sent the next pitch over the right-field wall for a three-run homer that evened the score.

That ended Young's night, but not the Yankees' surge. Two batters later, Eric Chavez delivered his first career pinch-hit homer, against Jon Rauch, as the Yankees grabbed a 4-3 lead.

Rauch suffered his seventh defeat, which moved him even with Houston's Fernando Rodriguez for the most losses in the majors.

ON STRIKES: A pair of strikeouts in the seventh, then two more in the eighth, undermined a Mets comeback bid.

Jordany Valdespin had a leadoff double in the seventh and reached third on a groundout, but southpaw Boone Logan entered and consecutively struck out Duda and Daniel Murphy as the opportunity to even the score at 4 went for naught.

The Mets placed two runners on base with one out in the eighth against David Robertson, but pinch hitter Justin Turner and Kirk Nieuwenhuis consecutively struck out.

THE SCORE: The Mets had owned a 3-0 lead. They opened the scoring in the third when Nieuwenhuis tucked a homer inside the left-field foul pole. An inning later, Alex Rodriguez’s error on Scott Hairston’s leadoff grounder to third base led to an unearned run and two-run lead. Hairston advanced to third on Omar Quintanilla’s double and scored on Josh Thole’s groundout. (Derek Jeter, like A-Rod, committed an error in the game.) Young’s RBI single in the sixth made it 3-0 after a two-out intentional walk to the No. 8 hitter Thole had placed runners at the corners.

WHAT'S NEXT: R.A. Dickey (11-1, 2.00 ERA) takes a streak of 42 2/3 innings without allowing an earned run into Sunday night's ESPN-televised game opposite CC Sabathia (9-3, 3.55). The Mets' franchise record for consecutive innings without allowing an earned run is within Dickey's reach -- 49 by Dwight Gooden in 1985.

Double Play: Subway Series storylines

June, 22, 2012
6/22/12
1:05
PM ET
We asked our bloggers, Mark Simon and Katie Sharp from ESPN Stats & Information, to take a closer look at the most intriguing storylines of this series.

What intrigues you most about Friday’s game?

Sharp: Can the Yankee lefties take Jonathon Niese deep?

Niese has allowed one home run to the 46 left-handed batters he’s faced this season, but that longball came in his most recent start against the Reds.

Yankee lefties have combined to hit 11 homers off same-handed pitchers, the most among all MLB teams. Curtis Granderson has seven of them this year, but has yet to homer off Niese in six career at-bats.

Simon: Will the Mets be able to resist Andy Pettitte’s slider.

Of the 20 sliders Pettitte threw with two strikes to Mets hitters, only four ended up in the strike zone. Yet, Pettitte recorded seven strikeouts with the pitch.

The Mets were actually better than most teams in terms of knowing when to chase that pitch (they swung at 41 percent of his out-of-zone sliders), but they’ll either need to be better, or avoid getting to those counts in the first place to have a successful night.

What intrigues you most about Saturday’s game?

Sharp: If Ivan Nova can continue his remarkable streak of excellent pitching performances in road interleague games.

Nova is 4-0 with a 0.98 ERA in four career interleague starts away from Yankee Stadium.

He is the first pitcher to start his career winning his first four road interleague starts while allowing no more than one run in each outing. The only other pitcher with a streak like that at any point in his career is Jamie Moyer, who had a similar four-start streak from 2002-04.

Simon: How many fly balls Chris Young allows that would have been home runs or extra-base hits in Yankee Stadium.

Young’s style is such that he allows a lot of fly balls, with a batted-ball breakdown of 36 flies, 22 grounders and 10 liners. In Yankee Stadium, about one of every seven fly balls leaves the park. In Citi Field, the rate is about one of every 12.

To his credit, Young has not allowed a homer in his first three starts. I’d expect that to change on Saturday night.

What intrigues you most about Sunday’s game?

Sharp: Can the Yankees solve R.A. Dickey’s knuckleball?

Dickey shut down the Yankees in two starts against them last year (two earned runs over 11 innings), but this is the first time he faces them in 2012.

Raul Ibanez and Alex Rodriguez have been able to hit Dickey in the past. Ibanez is the only player with three homers off the knuckleballer; A-Rod is 6-for-13 (.462) with two doubles against him.

However, the Yankee switch-hitters (Mark Teixeira and Nick Swisher) have not had much success against Dickey, going a combined 3-for-21 (.143) with six strikeouts and seven groundouts.

Simon: CC Sabathia's hitting.

Sabathia is 2-for-14 and hitless in his last nine at-bats as a Yankees hitter in regular-season play. That’s not like him. Prior to coming to the Yankees, Sabathia hit .259 with three home runs in 59 at-bats.

R.A. Dickey needs to know that grooving an 85 mile-per-hour fastball over the middle, like he might do against other pitchers, is not necessarily the best option against Sabathia.

Rapid Reaction: Yankees 5, Mets 4

June, 10, 2012
6/10/12
4:13
PM ET
WHAT IT MEANS: The euphoria generated by Johan Santana’s no-hitter nine days ago officially is extinguished.

A pair of infield miscues opened the door for a Yankees comeback as the Mets failed to protect a three-run lead over the final three innings. The Amazin’s ultimately were swept in the Subway Series with a 5-4 loss Sunday. Russell Martin delivered the walk-off win in the bottom of the ninth with a leadoff homer against Jon Rauch.

The Mets (32-29) were swept in the Bronx for only the second time since the inception of the Subway Series in 1997.

Having squandered a three-run lead, the Mets opened the ninth with consecutive doubles by Lucas Duda and Ike Davis against Rafael Soriano to pull even at 4 -- with Duda’s shot misread by center fielder Curtis Granderson. Davis, who produced his first ninth-inning hit in nine at-bats this season, then was erased at third base on a grounder to shortstop.

Where did things unravel?

With the Mets leading 3-2, Omar Quintanilla had a grounder from Derek Jeter roll under his glove to begin the bottom of the eighth, and the Yankee captain hustled to second base. Jeter ultimately scored the tying run on Mark Teixeira’s single up the middle against Bobby Parnell. Alex Rodriguez followed by driving in the go-ahead run with a bloop single to shallow right field.

The Mets held a 3-0 lead with two out into the seventh behind Jon Niese, when David Wright’s two-out throwing error, which Vinny Rottino could not handle at first base, allowed Andruw Jones to reach. Martin followed with a two-run homer to the short porch in right field at Yankee Stadium for a pair of unearned runs that pulled the Yankees within a run.

Now at the midpoint of a stretch of eight straight series against teams with winning records, the Mets still have series with the Rays, Reds, Orioles and Yankees remaining in that stretch. So far against the Phillies, Cardinals, Nationals and Yankees, the Mets are 5-8.

Three of the wins came in the four-game series against the Cardinals that included Santana’s no-hitter.

Mark Simon of ESPN Stats & Information notes that six times this season Parnell has induced a groundball that has resulted in the batter reaching via error. (Jeter’s technically was scored a single, with the error allowing him to reach second base.) Thirty-five of the 84 balls his in the ballpark against Parnell have been hits or errors -- an amazingly high total.

THEY WERE HEROES: Using a makeshift lineup, the Mets received contributions from Rottino and Jordany Valdespin, who combined to drive in three runs in the second inning.

That rally actually stalled when Jason Bay and Wright consecutively struck out with the bases loaded. Bay is 0-for-11 since returning from the DL.

Scott Hairston continued to torment left-handed pitching as well as the Mets built the early lead. Hairston doubled and scored in the second inning on Rottino’s single. Hairston then singled in his next at-bat, although Andy Pettitte’s pickoff move froze him and led to a caught stealing (as was the case with Wright two innings later).

Rottino was starting at first base over Davis against the southpaw. Davis entered as a defensive replacement for the bottom of the eighth with the Mets trying to protect a one-run lead -- one inning after Rottino could not handle Wright’s throw at first base.

Hairston went 2-for-3 against Pettitte, upping his average against left-handed pitching this season to .364 (24-for-66). He also has started to see more action against righties, starting not only Thursday’s series finale in D.C. once Bay was scratched but also Friday’s series opener in the Bronx as well against Hiroki Kuroda.

WHAT’S NEXT: The Mets plan to fly to Tampa after the game and spend an off-day with their families in Florida. They return to action Tuesday against the Rays, with Chris Young making his second major league start since returning from shoulder surgery. Young (0-0, 3.60 ERA) opposes right-hander Alex Cobb (2-2, 4.12).

Series preview: Mets at Yankees

June, 8, 2012
6/08/12
11:00
AM ET

Getty Images
The Mets face (l to r) Hiroki Kuroda, Phil Hughes and Andy Pettitte in the Subway Series.
METS (32-26, third place/NL East) vs. NEW YORK YANKEES (31-25, second place/AL East)

Friday: LHP Johan Santana (3-2, 2.38) vs. RHP Hiroki Kuroda (4-6, 3.82), 7:05 p.m. ET

Saturday: RHP Dillon Gee (4-3, 4.48) vs. RHP Phil Hughes (5-5, 4.96), 7:15 p.m. ET

Sunday: LHP Jon Niese (4-2, 4.11) vs. LHP Andy Pettitte (3-2, 2.78), 1:05 p.m. ET

Yankees short hops

• With a blood clot issue behind him, Mariano Rivera is due to undergo surgery Tuesday to repair a torn ACL. David Robertson, who briefly took over the closing role before suffering a left oblique strain, may begin a rehab assignment soon. Rafael Soriano now is effectively handling the closing role. Since Rivera became Yankees closer in 1997, the most saves in a season by another Yankees pitcher were Steve Karsay’s 12 in 2002. Soriano now has eight.

• Ex-Met Ryota Igarashi, a waiver claim by the Yankees from Toronto, has been promoted from Triple-A. He replaces long man Freddy Garcia, another ex-Met, who went on bereavement leave because of his grandfather’s death in Venezuela. Igarashi was 0-1 with a 3.60 ERA and had 11 strikeouts in five innings spanning three appearances with Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

Andy Pettitte, back from retirement, enters the Subway Series having limited Tampa Bay to two hits in 7 1/3 scoreless innings in his most recent outing. Pettitte -- who turns 40 next Friday -- has struck out 32 batters in 35 2/3 innings over five starts while producing a 2.78 ERA.


Seth Wenig/Associated Press
Robinson Cano has six homers in his past 18 games.


Derek Jeter is 0-for-his-last-13. That is the captain’s longest streak since going hitless in 14 straight at-bats from May 14-17, 2011. Jeter (.319) nonetheless is second in MLB with 75 hits, tied with Miguel Cabrera and trailing only Melky Cabrera (87). Jeter leads in the balloting among American League shortstops in the first All-Star Game voting totals announced. Mark Teixeira, Robinson Cano and Curtis Granderson rank second at their positions, which would make Granderson a starting outfielder.

Phil Hughes tossed a complete game against Detroit, allowing one run, in his most recent start.

• Granderson has played every inning for the Yankees this season. The only other players to have logged every defensive inning for their teams have played this season, according to the Elias Sports Bureau: Dan Uggla, Adam Jones and Starlin Castro. Granderson did go 0-for-5 and matched a career high with four strikeouts Thursday against Tampa Bay. He has 22 homers against left-handed pitching since the start of last season, the most in the majors during that span.

• The Yankees have the best all-time winning percentage in interleague play (.592, 158-109). The Chicago White Sox rank second at .586, followed by the Los Angeles Angels (.569), Boston Red Sox (.567) and Minnesota Twins (.562).

• The Yankees have struggled with runners in scoring position, hitting .217 (103-for-474) this season. Cleanup hitter Alex Rodriguez has only 22 RBIs in 207 at-bats in 2012. Despite errors by A-Rod and Nick Swisher on Thursday, the Yankees have been solid in the field, though. Their 22 errors are the fewest in the majors.

Hiroki Kuroda, who signed a one-year, $10 million deal during the offseason, has been wildly uneven, despite allowing two earned runs of fewer in seven of 11 starts. He has been prone to the long ball, having surrendered 11 homers in 68 1/3 innings. From 2008 to 2010 with the Dodgers, Kuroda allowed an average of 13.3 homers per season. Kuroda has a 7.36 ERA in the first inning. Only three current American League pitchers have more losses against the Mets than Kuroda’s five -- Carl Pavano (seven), Derek Lowe (six) and Kevin Millwood (six).

• Teixeira visited an ear, nose and throat specialist to determine the cause of a cough that won’t go away. The verdict: Texeira has residual nerve damage to a vocal cord from a bronchial illness. Teixeira, despite a slow start, has 10 homers.

Brett Gardner was unable to play in a rehab game with Class A Tampa on Thursday because of a cranky elbow, all but ensuring he will remain on the DL through the Subway Series. Lefty-hitting Raul Ibanez, in his first season as a Yankee, at 40 years old, has stepped into the primarily left-field role and flashed power (9 homers in 153 ABs). Righty-hitting Jayson Nix picks up some starts against southpaws.

• Cano has been streaky. He has six homers in his past 18 games. He had only three in his first 38 games.

• Catcher Russell Martin, who delivered a grand slam Tuesday against the Rays, homered for the second time in the series Thursday. He is hitting .357 (10-for-28) with seven RBIs in his past nine games. That has lifted his average from .173 to .210.

Last series results

Yankees won, 2-1, at Citi Field, July 1-3, 2011 (AP game recaps)

Yankees 5, Mets 1: Filling in for injured Derek Jeter, Eduardo Nunez got the big hits and made a clutch throw. Nunez had an RBI single among his career-high four hits and threw out Jose Reyes at third base on a favorable call for the Yankees. Mark Teixeira hit a two-run double, and Alex Rodriguez and Robinson Cano added RBI doubles. Ivan Nova (8-4) and six relievers stifled a Mets offense that scored 54 runs in its past five games. Jon Niese (7-7) was pitching for the first time since leaving his start June 25, 2011 with a rapid heartbeat. After giving up three runs in the first, he shut down the Yankees through six innings. More

Yankees 5, Mets 2: Eduardo Nunez homered in his latest big game at the plate and Bartolo Colon came off the DL to pitch six scoreless innings. Subbing at shortstop, Nunez is 7-for-8 with a homer and three doubles in the first two games of the series. Jose Reyes departed after two innings with tightness in his left hamstring. Held scoreless for the first five innings, the Yankees touched up rookie Dillon Gee (8-2) with four straight sharp hits in a four-run sixth. Curtis Granderson lifted a 1-2 pitch to right for his 22nd homer before Mark Teixeira and Alex Rodriguez singled. Robison Cano ripped a two-run triple and Nick Swisher followed with a sacrifice fly. Nunez added a solo homer off Tim Byrdak in the ninth to make it 5-0. More

Mets 3, Yankees 2 (10 innings): Down to their last strike against Mariano Rivera, the Mets wouldn't wilt. Pinch-hitter Ronny Paulino came through with a tying single off Rivera, Jason Bay drove home the winning run and the Mets ended the Yankees’ seven-game winning streak. Playing without Jose Reyes, the Mets were shut down by Freddy Garcia for seven innings before rallying against Rivera in the ninth to avoid a Subway Series sweep at Citi Field. With two outs and nobody on in the ninth, Bay walked on a full count. He went to third on Lucas Duda’s single and scored the tying run when Paulino punched a 1-2 pitch through the right side. More

Dickey's contemporary tidbits

March, 27, 2012
3/27/12
11:57
PM ET
R.A. Dickey talks extensively about his upbringing and life influences in his memoir, but he includes plenty of contemporary moments, too.

• Dickey recalls David Wright and Mike Pelfrey betting last spring training that Pelfrey could not kick a 50-yard field goal. Pelfrey and Dickey found a football field, with the aim of practicing for the challenge. The field was locked, so the duo hopped a fence. Pelfrey went on to nail a couple field goals from 50 yards, but his shin hurt so much from booting the football that Pelfrey could barely press the gas pedal on his vehicle during the ride home. Dickey convinced Pelfrey to call off the actual challenge with Wright to prevent really injuring himself.

• Dickey has a funny story about Alex Rodriguez. He is recalling a one-hit shutout of the Philadelphia Phillies while with the Mets, and flashes back to his previous career shutout -- with the Texas Rangers against Detroit. After that game, A-Rod congratulated Dickey and said, "You have me to thank for that. ... I called every pitch from shortstop" by relaying the signs to catcher Einar Diaz. The next game, Dickey recalled, he gave up six runs against the Royals and asked A-Rod afterward about his contribution. "No, I didn't call the pitches tonight," A-Rod replied.

• Dickey reveals that after being Jerry Manuel and Omar Minaya's first cut in 2010 spring training from big league camp, he called David Lipscomb University to inquire about the process of completing his English degree, which he had started pursuing at the University of Tennessee before being drafted in the first round by the Texas Rangers. Dickey's thought was to finish his degree so he could become an English teacher. Dickey never followed through by submitting his UT transcript and application to Lipscomb. And after a quick start with Triple-A Buffalo, including retiring 27 straight outs in one game after a leadoff hit, he found himself in the big leagues by May.

• Dickey discusses relocating his family to the vacated house of Shawn Green after his call-up and a hotel stay. The power got cut off shortly thereafter, and Dickey and family decided to live by candlelight for five days.

• Reflecting on spring training 2011, when the then-$1 billion lawsuit against Mets owners originally came to full light related to Bernard Madoff's Ponzi scheme, Dickey said the players mostly were insulated from the storyline. Still, he notes, there was occasional gallows humor among the players, including punchlines such as: "Maybe we'll be staying at Motel 6s on the road this year. ... I hope they didn't have our per diem money with Bernie. ... Is it true David Wright's going to be piloting our charter?"

• The Madoff humor appears a few pages later, too, when Dickey is talking about applying a solvent called Tring to a broken fingernail during a game. He writes: "I can dab on Trind until Bernie Madoff gets out of jail and it's not going to address the central issue: the broken nail is too short to allow me to grip my knuckleball." The kicker is that Theresa Corderi, the team's popular cook -- after the nail severely splits a few days later -- takes Dickey to a nearby Korean nail salon to get acrylic applied. Cost: $7. The knuckleballer, in full uniform, returns 10 minutes before a game and ultimately is able to make his next start.

• When Dickey tears a band of tissue in the bottom of his foot last season at Wrigley Field, he intentionally minimized the pain to team doctor Jonathan Deland, then takes a shot of Toradol in the backside before all of his starts the remainder of the season. Dickey said he always advises young pitchers to avoid the DL at all costs, since your replacement can be your successor.

Mets morning briefing 3.8.12

March, 8, 2012
3/08/12
7:13
AM ET
Today, Johan Santana is expected to throw a between-starts bullpen session, although there is no guarantee. Then Mike Pelfrey is due to take the mound for an afternoon Grapefruit League game against the Miami Marlins in Port St. Lucie. The Players Association also makes its annual visit to converse with Mets players today, so we may find out what union chief Michael Weiner thinks about the Mets' payroll level.

Also, please join me for a 12:30 p.m. online Mets chat. Click this link.

Meanwhile, live near Bellmore JFK High School on Long Island? You can hear alums Steve Levy and Adam Schefter of ESPN speak tonight at 7. I'm an alum of Mepham, one of the other two high schools in the district. Details on tonight's event here.

Thursday's news report:

• Not exactly a shocker, even though it was treated as such: Jose Reyes was looking for the most money as a free agent, just $1 more, Marlins team president David Samson reportedly told Miami businessmen. Reyes is not expected at today's Mets-Marlins game. He played the past two nights in exhibition games at the Marlins' new stadium in Miami against college teams -- the University of Miami and Florida International.

Andy Martino in the Daily News doesn't believe Samson. Writes Martino:

According to sources, Reyes would have strongly considered a somewhat smaller deal from the Mets, both in years and dollars, and was shocked when his longtime team did not make an offer.

My analysis: Reyes would not have defected from the Mets to Miami if the disparity in offers were $1, or probably even $1 million. But my information from reliable sources is that the Mets were willing to go to as much as five years guaranteed, with a vesting option for a sixth year that would have raised the value to $100 million if Reyes stayed healthy.

Don't get caught up in whether the Mets made a formal offer to Reyes. Sandy Alderson conveyed to agent Peter Greenberg the parameters the Mets could reach. And Reyes' side decided that would not be enough and went with the superior Marlins offer.

And, by the way, that's no crime. Players almost always go where the salary is highest. The union obviously encourages that, too. Tom Glavine never wanted to leave Atlanta for New York, for example. But the disparity in money offered was too much.

Furthermore, and I know this because I ended up on a plane with a Mets official after the winter meetings, who was candid: The Mets' strong suspicion is that the Marlins would not have been done bidding until they got Reyes. I don't want to minimize the Mets' economic woes as a factor in their tepid pursuit of Reyes, but the fact of the matter is the Mets likely would have just been increasing what Reyes would ultimately have received from Miami had they actively bid. At some point the Mets would have had to stop anyway because the contract would have reached what is beyond a prudent salary versus injury risk and expected decline in performance as Reyes ages.

Richard Sandomir in the Times notes that Fred Wilpon and family may be at a disadvantage in front of a jury because a group of average folk is probably not inclined to be sympathetic to multimillionaires. The Wilpons' attorneys unsuccessfully had tried to have the $386 million lawsuit heard by Judge Jed S. Rakoff alone. Writes Sandomir:

Rakoff, regarded as a brilliant but unpredictable jurist, alone will question the jury pool. He is a Yankees fan and a partial season-ticket holder. So his neutrality is assured and seems unlikely to be affected by his rooting interests. Anyway, the role of the opposing lawyers in shaping the makeup of the jury will be somewhat limited. Experts suggest that both sides probably already know the sort of jury makeup they want, and that mock trials have likely yielded juror profiles. But neither side will get all it wants. "The real challenge is to ferret out latent prejudices, so it's extremely important for lawyers to suggest questions to the judge beyond those the judge would use to elicit obvious biases," said Mark Zauderer, a partner at Flemming Zulack Williamson Zauderer in Manhattan. Rakoff need not use their questions. According to several lawyers and a jury consultant, the trustee will want jurors who resent millionaires. But Wilpon and [brother-in-law Saul] Katz’s team, they said, probably want less class-conscious people who might be more inclined to feel the trustee's pursuit of the Mets’ owners was overzealous and unfair.

Andy McCullough in the Star-Ledger updates the progress of Jenrry Mejia, who is throwing off a mound -- albeit fastballs only. Pitching coach Dan Warthen estimated Mejia is already throwing in the low-90s mph. The Mets are targeting a May return to game action for Mejia, at the one-year anniversary of his Tommy John surgery, which is the standard rehab time. Warthen told McCullough that Mejia's delivery looks somewhat calmer now than pre-elbow injury, which should reduce his susceptibility to future injury. It was Warthen a year ago, going against the prevalent organization philosophy, who said Mejia projected to him as a reliever because of the violence of his delivery. Meanwhile, Mejia sought advice from Edinson Volquez while rehabbing, and has been consoled by friend/fellow prospect Jeurys Familia when dejected because of the long rehab process.

Jon Niese tossed two scoreless innings and Justin Turner went 3-for-3 with a homer and three RBIs Wednesday as the Mets beat the Marlins, 7-0, in Jupiter.

• Niese is trying to improve his changeup, notes Mike Puma in the Post.

Bobby Parnell -- who dined with his family at a Port St. Lucie pizza joint last night, according to an eyewitness -- had a perfect inning in Wednesday's Grapefruit League game, bouncing back from a woeful intrasquad appearance Sunday. He is the subject of a feature in the Daily News.

There are five bullpen locks -- Frank Francisco, Jon Rauch, Ramon Ramirez, Tim Byrdak and Manny Acosta -- and Parnell is not one of them. He does have a minor league option remaining, but continued outings like Wednesday's should get him onto the major league staff, even if it's not the late-inning role he struggled with last season.

The Mets have not written off Parnell. They were credibly approached at the winter meetings by a team interested in acquiring him and were rebuffed. The Mets were leery of trading a pitcher who throws 100 mph and is under their control for four more seasons and not even eligible for arbitration until next winter in all likelihood. Parnell has only two years, 132 days of major league service time and would essentially need to spend the year in the minors not to qualify for arbitration next offseason for the first of three times.

If Parnell is on the Opening Day roster -- again, no given as of now -- that leaves one more spot. D.J. Carrasco has an existing $1.2 million deal, giving him a leg up, but one team insider said to watch Miguel Batista for one of those final two spots. Relievers facing a more uphill battle to sneak onto the Opening Day roster include younger pitchers Pedro Beato and Josh Stinson as well as left-handers Chuck James, Garrett Olson and Daniel Herrera.

David Wright (left rib-cage discomfort) does not sound like he will be back for at least a week. Terry Collins said Thursday that Wright should start taking grounders this weekend, but not throw. And Wright may or may not start swinging a bat this weekend. Meanwhile, Beato was scheduled to undergo an MRI on Wednesday afternoon, a day after being pulled from a Grapefruit League appearance with right shoulder difficulty.

• Columnist Joel Sherman in the Post uses ESPN's fantasy baseball rankings to note the declining state of third-base play in New York. Writes Sherman:

ESPN was displaying its top 12 fantasy third basemen, and I noticed Alex Rodriguez was ranked ninth and David Wright was not even among the 12 names shown. Now I do not want to confuse ESPN’s fantasy rankings with, say, The Dead Sea Scrolls for relevance. But it does provide a snapshot of third base right now in New York, which is to say the most uncertain since 2004. That was Rodriguez’s first season at his new position and Wright’s debut as a Met. Both are coming off injuries and their worst full years, so suddenly 2012 has a mandate-like feeling for the duo.

Wright told Sherman: "As far as I'm concerned it is a big motivator, not the doubt, but the fear of failure. I just don't like failing. But there is no doubt in me. I am very, very confident in what I am doing and what I need to do."

As for Wright's future with the club, Alderson said: "He is not trade bait. Is he part of the future? I hope the answer is yes. Let's see how he bounces back this season."

• Does Alderson have the autonomy -- there's that word again -- to guide the Mets properly? Columnist Bob Klaspich in the Record wonders if the GM will stand up to the Wilpons. Writes Klapisch:

Alderson has a track record to back up his promises. Then again, he’s never worked in an environment as toxic as this or for owners who are this unpopular. Fans are angry, they want the Wilpons out, many are vowing to stay away from Citi Field until regime change is complete. Alderson knows he’s about two years away from turning into a marked man, himself. It didn’t help matters last week when Fred Wilpon threw Alderson under the bus in explaining why Reyes signed with the Marlins. The owner had the audacity to say it was a "baseball decision" hatched entirely by Alderson. Don't blame me, blame him, is what Fred was saying. It was an outright lie and Alderson knows it. So does every discerning Mets fan who figured out long ago the Wilpons didn't have the resources to write a $100 million check.

David Lennon in Newsday profiles Ruben Tejada. Writes Lennon:

Just as Reyes did in his early years with the Mets, Tejada is still getting a better feel for English, which makes him come across as a bit shy on camera. "He's a different person from what you see on TV as opposed to what you get behind closed doors," Wright said. "During interviews and stuff, he's very introverted, but he's very outgoing when he's around us. He's got a dry sense of humor."

Read more on Tejada succeeding Reyes at shortstop with the Mets from Andrew Keh in the Times.

Santana is on track to start Sunday against the Marlins in Port St. Lucie, according to Collins. Read more in the Star-Ledger, Newsday, Times, Daily News and Post.

TRIVIA: Who played shortstop for the Mets the game before Reyes' major league debut?

(Wednesday's answer: The game before Wright made his major league debut with the Mets on July 21, 2004, Ty Wigginton started at third base for the Mets. Wigginton moved to first base for Wright's debut and was traded eight days after that to the Pittsburgh Pirates with now-slugger Jose Bautista and Matt Peterson for Kris Benson and Jeff Keppinger.)

Gee: Pitcher who hurts his cause

July, 2, 2011
7/02/11
5:41
PM ET
You always here of pitchers helping their cause. Well, Mets starter Dillon Gee did the opposite as he bounced into an inning-ending 5-5-3 double play with the bases loaded in the bottom of the fifth.

After Yankees starter Bartolo Colon retired 13 in a row, the Mets strung together three straight hits to load the bases for Gee. In a 2-2 count, he hit a chopper to Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez, who stepped on third and then threw across the diamond for the out at first. The teams were scoreless after five.

Gee entered the game batting .048 and is 0-for-2 on the day.

Video: Reyes never felt A-Rod tag

July, 2, 2011
7/02/11
12:23
AM ET
Jose Reyes discusses the seventh-inning out call at third base, maintaining he never felt Alex Rodriguez tag him.

Layne: 'I had him tagging him'

July, 1, 2011
7/01/11
11:17
PM ET

Noah K. Murray/The Star-Ledger/US Presswire
Jose Reyes gives an earful to ump Jerry Layne after a controversial out call at third base.
Here are quotes to a pool reporter from plate umpire Jerry Layne, who called out Jose Reyes in the seventh inning on a tag apparently missed by Alex Rodriguez. Layne may have been partly screened because he was rotating to cover third base on the play.

Your comments on play at third base?

"You see what it is," Layne said. "It was a close play at third base, and I'm not going to comment about the ejection. I had him tagging him, you know, on the side by the belt/buttocks are for an out."

The Mets argued that A-Rod missed the tag?

"Yes."

You clearly saw a tag?

"I called what I saw."

That was your call?

"That was my call, yeah."

Meanwhile, Terry Collins said he had no problem with Reyes' aggressiveness, which took a runner off the bases for Carlos Beltran.

“His instincts said he should go to third,” Collins said. “Sometimes you can’t corral a guy who plays like that. I have no problem with it. None whatsoever. He’s done that all year for us, and nine out of 10 he’s safe and created runs. And that energy picks the club up. It probably would have been a little different situation if it had been somebody else.”

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TEAM LEADERS

WINS LEADER
Bartolo Colon
WINS ERA SO IP
12 3.82 130 167
OTHER LEADERS
BAD. Murphy .301
HRL. Duda 26
RBIL. Duda 76
RD. Murphy 73
OPSL. Duda .856
ERAJ. Niese 3.47
SOZ. Wheeler 148