New York Mets: Chase Whitley

Rapid Reaction: Yankees 1, Mets 0

May, 15, 2014
May 15
10:16
PM ET
NEW YORK -- Jacob deGrom had a stellar big league debut, yet with the Mets’ bats familiarly silent, the 25-year-old right-hander came away with a loss.

Alfonso Soriano’s two-out, run-scoring double to left-center against deGrom in the seventh broke a scoreless tie, and the Yankees beat the Mets 1-0 Thursday before an announced crowd of 40,133 to earn a split of the four-game Subway Series.

After producing a combined 21 runs in a pair of wins in the Bronx, the Mets (19-21) returned to Citi Field and were shut out for two straight days. Combined with consecutive shutouts May 6-7 in Miami, the Mets have been blanked four times in their past nine games.

The Mets mustered only three hits in a combined shutout effort by debuting Chase Whitley, Dellin Betances, Adam Warren and David Robertson. DeGrom, a former college shortstop and .176 career minor league hitter, had one of those hits. Betances and Warren combined to strike out seven straight Mets during the sixth through eighth innings. The seven straight K's by the Mets matched a franchise record, last done Aug. 11, 2010, against the Colorado Rockies, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

Robertson retired David Wright on a groundout to shortstop to strand runners on the corners and end the eighth en route to a four-out save.


Kathy Willens/Associated PressFirst-base coach Tom Goodwin congratulates Jacob deGrom after the rookie produced a hit in his first big league at-bat -- and the first hit by a Mets pitcher this season.


DeGrom’s line: 7 IP, 4 H, 1 R, 1 ER, 2 BB, 6 K. He threw 91 pitches (57 strikes).

DeGrom became the first debuting starting pitcher in franchise history to be charged with a loss in a game in which he logged at least seven innings and limited the opponent to one run.

The last debuting MLB starting pitcher to get charged with a loss in a game in which he tossed at least seven innings and limited the opponent to one run was Jimmy Haynes with the Baltimore Orioles against Boston on Sept. 13, 1995.

Pitching in a scoreless game in the seventh, deGrom had a streak of 11 straight batters retired snapped when he walked Mark Teixeira with one out. Next, with the Mets again playing an overshift against Brian McCann, the Mets attempted an inning-ending 4-5-3 double play. But Wright, attempting the turn at second base, made a low and offline throw to first base, and Lucas Duda was unable to scoop it.

With McCann safe and the inning prolonged, Soriano followed with the decisive triple.

Duda and Wright had turned a nifty 3-5-3 double play on McCann to end Monday’s game in the Bronx.

It’s a hit: In his first big league plate appearance, the former college shortstop deGrom snapped an 0-for-64 drought by Mets pitchers. That was the longest futility streak to begin a season by a pitching staff in MLB history and had tied the 1946 Cleveland Indians for the second-longest drought ever, regardless of point in the season. The 1914 Indians, who went 0-for-92, remain the record holders.

DeGrom also delivered a sacrifice bunt in his second and final plate appearance. That placed runners at second and third with two outs in the fifth against Whitley, who was making his big league debut for the Yankees. Manager Joe Girardi inserted reliever Betances to face Eric Young Jr, who grounded out to third base to strand the two baserunners as the game continued in a scoreless tie.

Farewell, Jeets: The Mets played a video tribute to retiring Derek Jeter before his 88th and final regular-season Subway Series game.

Jeter then went 0-for-4. That included sending a shot back at deGrom in the third inning with two runners aboard and one out. DeGrom snared the liner and doubled Brett Gardner off first base to escape the jam.

Jeter’s final career regular-season statistics against the Mets: .364 (131-for-360) with 13 homers and 44 RBIs. Jeter has a higher career average against only the Pittsburgh Pirates (.417 in 36 at-bats) and Colorado Rockies (.368 in 34 at-bats).

Among players with 100 career at-bats against the Mets, only Rico Carty (.380) and Don Slaught (.376) had higher averages.

Welcome back: Newly promoted Josh Edgin tossed only one pitch in his season debut. After inheriting runners on the corners and two outs in the eighth, he coaxed a flyout to left field from Jacoby Ellsbury.

What’s next: The Mets head to Washington D.C. for a weekend series against the Washington Nationals. Jonathon Niese (2-2, 2.17 ERA) opposes right-hander Tanner Roark (2-1, 3.65) in Friday’s 7:05 p.m. series opener. Bryce Harper, Ryan Zimmerman and Adam LaRoche are all on the DL for the Nats.

Morning Briefing: Hello deGrom, bye Jeter

May, 15, 2014
May 15
5:39
AM ET

Adam RubinJacob deGrom makes his major-league debut Thursday against the Yankees.
NEW YORK

FIRST PITCH: The Subway Series finale originally was slated to pit Dillon Gee against CC Sabathia. Now, both are on the disabled list. And Mets-Yankees instead concludes with a pair of starting pitchers making their big-league debuts -- Jacob deGrom versus right-hander Chase Whitley.

DeGrom (4-0, 2.58 ERA at Las Vegas) steps into the starting role because Gee landed on the DL on Wednesday with a right lat-muscle strain. The Mets, who weighed keeping Gee active and having him miss one start, now expect he will miss two starts and return from the DL when eligible.

Coming on the heels of Rafael Montero’s start Wednesday, it will mark the first time in franchise history the Mets have used starting pitchers making their major-league debuts in consecutive games.

The last time an MLB team used debuting starting pitchers in consecutive games? The Milwaukee Brewers on Sept. 2-3, 2002, with Ben Diggins and Dave Pember, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

The last time two debuting pitchers started opposite each other in an MLB game? Coincidentally, that involved Gee -- who pitched opposite Washington’s Yunesky Maya on Sept. 7, 2010.

In the past 100 years, there have only been seven non-September instances of both starting pitchers making their big-league debuts, according to Elias.

Bobby Parnell, who will miss the remainder of the season after undergoing Tommy John surgery, was transferred to the 60-day DL to clear a 40-man roster spot for deGrom.

Meanwhile, Thursday marks the final regular-season game for retiring Derek Jeter against the Mets.

As the Mets did with Mariano Rivera last season and Chipper Jones in 2012, they will have an afternoon ceremony in a conference room to present Jeter with a gift -- not on-field recognition before the first pitch. A clip from that ceremony likely will be played for fans pregame on the scoreboard.

The Mets are expected to present Jeter with artwork, as they did with Chipper.

Thursday’s news reports:


Anthony Gruppuso/USA TODAY SportsRafael Montero allowed three runs in six innings in his major-league debut.


• Montero did a solid job in his debut, but Masahiro Tanaka tossed a four-hit shutout and the Yankees snapped a six-game Subway Series losing streak with a 4-0 win Wednesday at Citi Field. The Mets (19-20) dropped a game under .500.

Terry Collins suggested three shots the Mets hit on Wednesday would have been homers had the game been played in the Bronx, including David Wright’s first-inning blast to the track with a runner on base.

The Mets had a pair of costly, ill-advised plays. With Tanaka on deck, a runner on first base and two outs, left fielder Eric Young Jr. decided to dive for a second-inning sinking liner off Brian Roberts’ bat rather than concede a single and keep it in front of him. E.Y. Jr. played the ball into a run-scoring triple. On the basepaths, Chris Young tried to steal second with Tanaka holding the ball, Lucas Duda at the plate and the Mets trailing, 2-0. He easily was retired.

Montero’s final line: 6 IP, 5 H, 3 R, 3 ER, 2 BB, 3 K, 2 HR. The second homer came after Montero was sent out for the sixth inning with his pitch count already at 97, on a solo shot by Mark Teixeira.

The unbeaten Tanaka -- the first 6-0 Yankees rookie starter since Whitey Ford in 1950 -- even produced a ninth-inning hit. Mets pitchers are now 0-for-64 at the plate this season. That futility matches the 1946 Cleveland Indians for the second-worst hitless streak by pitchers in MLB history, according to Elias. The all-time record: 0-for-92 by Cleveland pitchers in 1914.

Given E.Y. Jr. and Ruben Tejada’s hot streaks ended -- they went a combined 1-for-7 Wednesday -- it appears likely they will find themselves on the bench for the Subway Series finale.

Read game recaps in the Post, Daily News, Times, Star-Ledger, Record, Journal, Newsday and at MLB.com.

• The Mets dumped Kyle Farnsworth a couple of days ahead of a deadline after which his $1 million contract for the season would have become guaranteed. Farnsworth, who notched a save as recently as Monday, had signed an “advanced consent” waiver. That allowed the Mets to drop him within 45 day of him joining the club on April 2 and only be responsible for the portion of the contract during which he was active -- about $250,000.

Farnsworth, who plans to refuse a minor-league assignment and become a free agent, was angry with the decision, calling it “sad” and describing himself as “very bitter.”

One member of the organization described himself as “speechless” after learning of the move.

Josh Edgin, who had a 4.97 ERA and had allowed 17 hits and 11 walks in 12 2/3 innings with Vegas, will be promoted and join Scott Rice as a left-hander in the bullpen.

Who’s the closer? Terry Collins hasn’t named one yet, but Jeurys Familia, Jenrry Mejia and Daisuke Matsuzaka would be candidates.

Read more in the Record, Journal, Newsday and at MLB.com.

Travis d’Arnaud likely will land on the seven-day concussion DL before Thursday’s game. D’Arnaud had been struck on the top of the head by Alfonso Soriano’s backswing in the ninth inning Tuesday. D’Arnaud is continuing to undergo concussion tests. Juan Centeno, already on the 40-man roster, is expected to join the Mets on Thursday from Vegas. He was hitting .273 with one homer and 11 RBIs in 77 at-bats with the 51s. Read more in the Star-Ledger.

• Gee said there was no issue with his lat when he was pulled after 81 pitches from his last start. It only arose afterward and intensified during a bullpen session Tuesday in the Bronx. Read more in the Post, Daily News, Journal and Newsday.


Win McNamee/Getty ImagesEric Young Jr. visited Kravis Children's Hospital on Wednesday.


• E.Y. Jr. visited Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mt. Sinai before heading to Citi Field for the Subway Series on Wednesday. He appeared on the hospital’s closed-circuit TV show and answered questions for kids who were too sick to come down to a studio. E.Y. Jr. took pictures and signed autographs for patients who were well enough to attend the live show in the hospital’s lobby.

• Greg Peavey allowed three runs (two earned) in seven innings and Chasen Bradford notched his seventh save as Binghamton beat Altoona, 5-3. Peavey’s success coincides with his wife and recently born son getting into town, writes Lynn Worthy in the Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin.

Before Savannah won two games from Greenville on Wednesday, outfield prospect Jared King -- who recently proposed to his girlfriend on the field -- landed on the DL with a fractured right fibula. King suffered the injury getting hit by a pitch on May 7. Read the full minor-league recap here.

• Shake Shack founder Danny Meyer disputed allegations from Duda and Philadelphia Phillies manager Ryne Sandberg that bad burgers gave them food poisoning.

“It’s highly unlikely,” Meyer told the Post. “If you’re in a restaurant and one person says they got food poisoning from fish, you can say, ‘Well, that was probably one bad fish.’ But with hamburger meat, it’s an entire batch. And we haven’t heard of one other case of food poisoning. We don’t know for sure a Shake Shake burger made them sick.”

Daniel Barbarisi in the Journal reported fans at Citi Field on Wednesday did not seem dissuaded from buying Shake Shack food.

• Columnist Joel Sherman in the Post suggests there is pressure on both New York GMs because they are playing in divisions up for grabs because of mediocrity. Writes Sherman:

[Sandy] Alderson already made a significant move during this Subway Series by shifting Rafael Montero into the rotation and Jenrry Mejia into the pen. The Mets’ long-shot chances this season could be about this: Can Alderson take some of that young pitching he has been diligently stockpiling the past four years and turn it into a July bat -- a Jose Bautista for mid-lineup heft or an Alexei Ramirez to solve shortstop, perhaps?

[Brian] Cashman faces a potentially more daunting issue because the Yanks have more age -- and thus more potential leaks -- and less farm system. At this moment, the Yankees look as if they need a sidekick for Masahiro Tanaka. So they might have to find out just how much a trade fronted by Gary Sanchez or John Ryan Murphy would bring. Does that get them into, for example, a Jeff Samardzija sweepstakes or do they have to lower their sights to the Bronson Arroyo/Jason Hammel level?

• Columnist David Lennon in Newsday suggests payroll still matters, as the Yankees demonstrated with their capacity to land Tanaka.

• Columnist Mike Vaccaro in the Post calls the rash of Tommy John surgeries to high-profile young pitchers “the dark cloud hovering in baseball’s sky now.”

• In a where-are-they-now look, Ken Belson in the Times notes Dae-Sung Koo -- of double-off-Randy Johnson-and-scoring-with-a-weighted-ball-in-his-pocket fame -- has been pitching in Australia.

• Jared Diamond in the Journal suggests the Subway Series still has juice. Writes Diamond:

According to the YES Network, Monday night's game at Yankee Stadium generated the highest ratings for a Subway Series telecast on a New York regional sports station since 2011, averaging 494,000 total viewers. On Tuesday, the Rangers' hockey game and the NBA playoffs siphoned off some viewers, but the Subway Series has re-established itself as a solid draw.

Even with the Brooklyn Nets' playoff game competing with baseball on Wednesday, the stations anticipated another potential bump with rookie pitcher Masahiro Tanaka on the mound for the Yankees.

• Mike Ozanian at Forbes opines about the value of the Mets if they were sold.

BIRTHDAYS: Tyler Walker, whose eight-year big-league career as a reliever began with the Mets in 2002, turns 38.

TWEETS OF THE DAY: YOU’RE UP: What gift should the Mets present to Derek Jeter?

Rapid Reaction: Mets 9, Yankees 7

May, 12, 2014
May 12
10:44
PM ET
NEW YORK -- True New Yorkers were celebrating Monday in the Bronx.

Lucas Duda delivered a broken-bat, run-scoring single that plated Eric Campbell and evened the score, and Chris Young followed with a two-run homer later in the eighth inning as the New York Mets beat the New York Yankees 9-7 before an announced crowd of 46,517 in the Bronx.

The Mets (18-19) slugged a season-high four home runs -- by Travis d’Arnaud, Curtis Granderson, Eric Young Jr. and C.Y. They won for only the third time in their past 11 games.

Kyle Farnsworth got into a one-out jam in the ninth with runners on the corners, but Brian McCann grounded into a game-ending double play, initiated by a diving stop by Duda and turned at second base by David Wright because of the overshift.

Penned: Jenrry Mejia, reassigned to the bullpen before the game, made his 2014 relief debut and earned the win.


Christopher Pasatieri/Getty ImagesDerek Jeter and David Wright share a yuk at the end of the first inning.


Mejia inherited a runner on second with two outs in the seventh inning and the Mets trailing 7-6. He struck out Alfonso Soriano on three pitches.

Then, staked to a 9-7 lead after the Mets’ three-run eighth, Mejia allowed a leadoff single to Yangervis Solarte. Kelly Johnson followed by grounding into a double play. Brian Roberts singled, but Mejia rallied by striking out Brett Gardner.

Not his day: Bartolo Colon surrendered a second-inning grand slam to Gardner and eventually was charged with seven runs (six earned) in 5 2/3 innings in a no-decision. In his eight starts, Colon has allowed seven or more runs three times. His ERA has ballooned to 5.84.

A half-inning after Granderson slugged a game-tying two-run homer, the Yankees scored three runs in the bottom of the sixth to take a 7-4 lead. The final run charged to Colon scored when d’Arnaud threw to second base on Gardner’s steal attempt. The throw went into center field, allowing Roberts to trot home with an unearned run.

True New Yorker: Granderson received a tame mixture of boos and cheers in his return to Yankee Stadium as a visitor -- although it’s hard to tell which set of fans was offering which reaction.

The friendly confines of Yankee Stadium proved a welcome sight. Granderson launched a two-run homer in the sixth against Hiroki Kuroda that evened the score at 4.

During a pregame interview, Granderson said his “True New Yorker” statement -- made when he was introduced during the winter meetings -- was not something cooked up by marketing people to launch a campaign the Mets eventually would adopt during the 2014 season.

“It was something that I heard from people around the city,” Granderson said. “It was me repeating what I had heard, what people said.”

Granderson’s original December quote: “A lot of the people I’ve met in New York have always said that true New Yorkers are Mets fans. So I’m excited to get a chance to see them all out there.”

The Mets recently sent an email blast to fans touting that slogan with a request for them to sign a loyalty oath.

Sparkplug: E.Y. Jr., who essentially had been benched once Juan Lagares returned from the disabled list on May 1, has made the most of back-to-back starts. He has produced consecutive three-hit games and scored twice and drove in two runs Monday.

E.Y. Jr. pulled the Mets within 7-6 with a two-run homer in the seventh against Alfredo Aceves, who had been speculated as the Thursday starter in place of CC Sabathia. Right-hander Chase Whitley could make his MLB debut in Thursday’s Subway Series finale instead of Aceves.

E.Y.’s last homer came on Aug. 2, 2013.

With the Mets facing a left-hander Tuesday and the designated hitter in use, Terry Collins likely will be able to use all four of his primary outfielders, including E.Y. Jr., in the starting lineup.

Happy birthday: Ex-Yankee/Met Yogi Berra celebrated his 89th birthday at the game.

What’s next: Zack Wheeler (1-3, 4.35 ERA) opposes left-hander Vidal Nuno (1-0, 5.47) in Tuesday’s 7:05 p.m. game in the Bronx.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

TEAM LEADERS

BA LEADER
Daniel Murphy
BA HR RBI R
.295 8 42 62
OTHER LEADERS
HRL. Duda 19
RBIL. Duda 60
RD. Murphy 62
OPSL. Duda .864
WB. Colon 10
ERAJ. Niese 3.23
SOZ. Wheeler 125