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Tuesday, February 5, 2013
Report: Cervelli's name on clinic's list

By Wallace Matthews



Yankees catcher Francisco Cervelli’s name appears in the records of the Miami clinic suspected of supplying performance-enhancing drugs to major league baseball players, according to a Yahoo! Sports report.

Cervelli and former National League MVP Ryan Braun, who tested positive for PEDs following the 2011 season, are the latest major leaguers whose names have surfaced in connection with the Biogenesis clinic, run by Anthony Bosch, that is currently under investigation by Major League Baseball.

Neither Cervelli’s nor Braun’s name are alongside any written reference to any specific PED. Last week, the New Times, a Miami-based weekly, published an investigative story that reproduced pages of Biogenesis records in which Rodriguez’s name appeared alongside notations for HGH and other performance-enhancing drugs.

Through a spokesman, Rodriguez denied any relationship with Bosch and challenged the legitimacy of the records. He also denied an ESPN.com story by T.J. Quinn and Mike Fish that quoted sources as saying Bosch had injected Rodriguez with PEDs at his home in Miami.

The Yankees have refused to comment on the matter pending the outcome of MLB’s investigation, and Yankees GM Brian Cashman did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment about Cervelli’s alleged involvement in the case.

Cervelli, a career .271 hitter with five home runs in parts of three big-league seasons, spent most of last season in the minor leagues but is expected to compete for the Yankees starting catcher’s job at spring training beginning Feb. 17.

UPDATE: Cervelli tweeted his response to the Yahoo! report, saying:

Following my foot injury in March 2011, I consulted with a number of experts, including BioGenesis Clinic, for (cont)

— Francisco Cervelli (@fran_cervelli) February 6, 2013

(cont)legal ways to aid my rehab and recovery.I purchased supplements that I am certain were not prohibited by Major League Baseball.

— Francisco Cervelli (@fran_cervelli) February 6, 2013