NFC East: Eddie George

Continuing our team-by-team series on the history of the specific draft picks each NFC East team has this year, we take a look today at the Dallas Cowboys, who have eight picks in this year's draft.

Turning up some interesting trivia in these. For instance, the Cowboys have the 186th pick, which produced Deacon Jones, and the 152nd pick, with which the Houston Texans last year took a quarterback who a few months later started their first two playoff games in franchise history.

PICK 14 (14th pick, first round)

Last five players taken

2011 -- Robert Quinn, DE, Rams

2010 -- Earl Thomas, S, Seahawks

2009 -- Malcolm Jenkins, DB, Saints

2008 -- Chris Williams, T, Bears

2007 -- Darrelle Revis, CB, Jets

Cowboys' history of No. 14 picks

The Cowboys have never had the No. 14 pick.

Hall of Famers picked No. 14

Jim Kelly (1983), Gino Marchetti (1952), Len Ford (1948, AAFC)

Other notables

Jeremy Shockey (2002), Eddie George (1996), Dick Stanfel (1951)

PICK 45 (13th pick, round 2)

Last five players taken

2011 -- Rahim Moore, DB, Broncos

2010 -- Zane Beadles, G, Broncos

2009 -- Clint Sintim, LB, Giants

2008 -- Jordon Dizon, LB, Lions

2007 -- Dwayne Jarrett, WR, Panthers

Cowboys' history of No. 45 picks

1968 -- Dave McDaniels

Hall of Famers picked No. 45

Dave Casper (1974)

PICK 81 (19th pick, third round)

Last five players taken

2011 --DeMarcus Van Dyke, DB, Raiders

2010 -- Earl Mitchell, DT, Texans

2009 -- Roy Miller, DT, Buccaneers

2008 -- Early Doucet, WR, Cardinals

2007 -- Jay Alford, DT, Giants

Cowboys' history of No. 81 picks

1984 -- Fred Cornwell

1982 -- Jim Eliopulos

1981 -- Glenn Titensor

1977 -- Val Belcher

Hall of Famers picked No. 81

None, though Art Shell was the 80th pick in 1968 and Joe Montana was the 82nd in 1979.

PICK 113 (18th pick, round four)

Last five players picked

2011 -- Chimdi Chekwa, DB, Raiders

2010 -- Aaron Hernandez, TE, Patriots

2009 -- Vaughn Martin, DT, Chargers

2008 -- Dwight Lowery, CB, Jets

2007 -- Brian Smith, DE, Jaguars

Cowboys' history of No. 113 picks

1989 -- Keith Jennings

1984 -- Steve Pelluer

1975 -- Kyle Davis

Hall of Famers picked No. 113

None. But Steve Largent was picked 117th in 1976 and George Blanda was picked 119th in 1949.

PICK 135 (40th pick, fourth round)

Last five players picked

2011 --Ricky Stanzi, QB, Chiefs

2010 -- Dominique Franks, DB, Falcons

2009 -- Troy Kropog, T, Titans

2008 -- Josh Sitton, G, Packers

2007 -- Joe Cohen, DT, 49ers

Cowboys' history of No. 135 picks

1983 -- Chuck McSwain

Hall of Famers picked No. 135

None. Closest were Jackie Smith and Roger Staubach, who were picked No. 129 in 1963 and 1964, respectively.

PICK 152 (17th pick, round 5)

Last five players picked

2011 -- T.J. Yates, QB, Texans

2010 -- Otis Hudson, G, Bengals

2009 -- James Casey, TE, Texans

2008 -- Letroy Guion, DT, Vikings

2007 -- Antonio Johnson, DT, Titans

Cowboys' history of No. 152 picks

1984 -- Eugene Lockhart

1969 -- Rick Shaw

Hall of Famers taken No. 152

None. Closest I found was Arnie Weinmeister, No. 166 in 1945.

PICK 186 (16th pick, round 6)

Last five players taken

2011 -- D.J. Smith, LB, Packers

2010 -- Clifton Geathers, DE, Browns

2009 -- Robert Henson, LB, Redskins

2008 -- Colt Brennan, QB, Redskins

2007 -- Thomas Clayton, RB, 49ers

Cowboys' history of No. 186 pick

2003 -- Zuriel Smith

1976 -- Greg Schaum

Hall of Famers picked No. 186

Deacon Jones (1961)

PICK 222 (15th pick, round 7)

Last five players taken

2011 -- Anthony Gaitor, DB, Buccaneers

2010 -- Marc Mariani, WR, Titans

2009 -- Pat McAfee, P, Colts

2008 -- Chester Adams, G, Bears

2007 -- Derek Schouman, FB, Bills

Cowboys' history of No. 222 picks

1984 -- Mike Revell

1978 -- Homer Butler

Hall of Famers picked No. 222

None. Closest was Andy Robustelli, picked 228th in 1951

Jacobs' size doesn't matter to Lewis

November, 12, 2008
11/12/08
3:43
PM ET
Posted by ESPN.com's Matt Mosley

Ravens middle linebacker Ray Lewis is one of the smartest players in the game. In our offseason ESPN.com coaches' poll, Zach Thomas and Lewis headlined the list of the league's smartest defensive players.

Lewis loves getting in a quarterback's mind (see Eli Manning's rookie season), and he's obviously a punishing player. He was on a conference call with the New York media Wednesday, and his answers were quite revealing. Here's an excerpt that deals with Giants 264-pound running back Brandon Jacobs:

There aren't too many running backs in the league that are almost 270 pounds. When you look at Brandon Jacobs what do you see in him, and what is the best way to stop him?

Ray Lewis: He is a physical back. He is a physical back. He plays the game very physical. The only way to stop somebody like that is to run into them full speed. The name of football is hit or be hit. So the bottom line, I don't care how big his size is. Football is football. And when you strap on your chin strap I don't care how big you are, deal with whoever has the ball and let life take care of itself. You know what I'm saying? You just know that I'm not -- as a middle linebacker -- you don't want to let them start getting to your secondary like you see the Eagles and a lot of people did. Like big gaping holes the way he is getting up on your corners and your secondary. I don't think that is an even match. But when you are dealing with the front seven in there with linebackers meeting running backs and fullbacks and things, then let it take care of itself. But our job is just to not let him get to our secondary because he can be an imposing threat back there.

A little different, though. You don't run into a 264-pound running back very often.

RL: Okay, so what are you going to do, run from it? No, you just play football. It doesn't matter. I don't look on the schedule and look at somebody's weight and say, 'Oh, guess what, he is 260. I can't run into him.' Hell no. I'm chasing him. It doesn't matter; size has never mattered in this game. And the day you put size in this game you lose all your credibility on why you play the game. You play the game for that. You play the game -- I remember these same stories about how Eddie George was. He was so big and so bruising. Okay, let football take care of itself. That is what it has always done and it always will do the same thing.

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