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Redskins GM Scot McCloughan says good communication vital to success

1/13/2015

ASHBURN, Va. -- It's not always having an eye for talent. It's often about working with the head coach. That's something Scot McCloughan learned from working with a number of coaches and it's what he knows must happen in Washington.

Former San Francisco 49ers head coach Mike Nolan, who hired McCloughan, said that was something the Washington Redskins' new general manager did well. And McCloughan knows that must be duplicated here with coach Jay Gruden as well as president Bruce Allen. It's the way McCloughan saw it work when he was in Green Bay (with coach Mike Holmgren) as well as Seattle (with Pete Carroll).

"When we've had success," McCloughan said, "it's communication on a daily basis. It's not about the one individual; it's about the sum of the parts. That's not just dealing with Jay, but dealing with coordinators, dealing with position coaches, sitting with Bruce and talking contract-wise and all that."

But that takes time. Just like it will take time for him to mold the scouting department to his liking (he's already said any changes would be made after the draft). And just like it could take time for his work to have the impact everyone wants.

"There's going to be disagreements and that's part of it," McCloughan said. "There's strong enough people in this building with enough backbone to say, 'Listen. OK, let's watch some more tape. I see this, you don't see that. Let's do it because that's what we're here to do.'"

It's a process the Redskins say they like. That's not to say it'll always be unanimous when it comes to who they like or want. That rarely happens. McCloughan does have the ultimate say over the roster. But he also wants input.

"It's not going to be me standing up there saying, 'I get to make the pick,'" McCloughan said. "It's not going to be Jay standing up there saying, 'I make the pick,' or Bruce. It's going to be us. The more good opinions you get around yourself, the better chance you have of being successful."