Cobb's return another big boost for Packers

December, 28, 2013
12/28/13
5:07
PM ET
CHICAGO -- As if getting quarterback Aaron Rodgers back from his broken collarbone weren’t enough, the Green Bay Packers' offense just got even more formidable when receiver Randall Cobb was activated from the injured reserve/designated to return list Saturday.

Cobb
That means Cobb is available for Sunday’s game against the Chicago Bears at Soldier Field, where the winner goes to the playoffs as the NFC North champion and the loser’s season is over.

The Packers also added Cobb to the injury report Saturday. He was listed as questionable, meaning there's no guarantee he will be active Sunday against the Bears.

The Packers seemed to be heading in the direction of activating Cobb earlier in the week, when he went through a full-pads practice Thursday and increased his practice work even further Friday.

“It’s a good time to get everyone back and see what happens,” Packers receiver Jordy Nelson said earlier this week.

“We’re getting guys healthy at the right time, and we just have to go play good football and try to win the game.”

No one should be happier than Nelson about the return of Rodgers and Cobb.

Not only does he have his starting quarterback throwing him the ball for the first time in nearly two months but the return of Cobb allows Nelson to move out of the slot and back to the outside, where he is more effective.

When Cobb broke the tibia just below his right knee Oct. 13 against the Baltimore Ravens, he was leading the Packers in receptions (29).

“Randall Cobb’s a playmaker. He’s dangerous with the ball in his hands," coach Mike McCarthy said. "He’s done an excellent job developing into a fine slot receiver. So, our offense is based on making a quarterback successful, starting with the run game and then spreading the ball around. He definitely is someone you want to get the ball to. He has big-play ability.”

Rob Demovsky

ESPN Green Bay Packers reporter

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