NFC North: Brad Jones

Examining the Green Bay Packers' roster:

Quarterbacks (3)
The Packers have not kept three quarterbacks on their opening-day roster since 2008, but they might be inclined to do so this season in order to avoid a situation like last year, when Rodgers broke his collarbone. Coach Mike McCarthy is high on Tolzien, who made two starts last season, but Flynn has proved he can win as a backup in Green Bay.

Running backs (4)

The return of Harris, who missed all of last season because of a knee injury, gives the Packers insurance behind Lacy and Starks. Kuhn is valuable both as a fullback and on special teams. It's possible they'll keep a fourth halfback, but the loss of Johnathan Franklin to a career-ending neck injury has left them without a strong in-house candidate for that spot.

Receivers (6)

The Packers often keep only five receivers, but given that they drafted three -- Adams (second round), Abbrederis (fifth round) and Janis (seventh round) -- there's a good chance they will keep six. Abbrederis and Janis will not only have to show they're better prospects than second-year pros Myles White and Chris Harper, but they also could help themselves if they can return kicks.

Tight ends (4)

McCarthy likes tight ends (he has kept five before), and the wild card is undrafted rookie Colt Lyerla.

Offensive linemen (8)

The Packers typically only activate seven offensive linemen on game day, so they can get away with keeping just eight on the roster. Barclay's ability to play all five positions also allows them some freedom. Lane Taylor could be the ninth lineman if they go that route.

Defensive line (7)

Worthy and Guion have work to do to make the roster, but there's room for them if you count Julius Peppers and Mike Neal among the outside linebackers, which is where they lined up more often in the offseason.

Linebackers (8)

There will be some tough cuts here. Second-year pros Nate Palmer and Andy Mulumba both played last year as rookie outside linebackers. It also may be tough for highly touted undrafted rookie Adrian Hubbard to make it.

Cornerbacks (6)

Hayward's return from last season's hamstring injury means he likely will return as the slot cornerback in the nickel package, a role played last year by Micah Hyde (who may primarily play safety this year).

Safeties (4)

The major question here is whether Hyde or Clinton-Dix will be the starter alongside Burnett. Chris Banjo, who played primarily on special teams last season, might be the odd man out.

Specialists (3)

There's no competition at any of these spots.
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- Here's a look at what stood out from the Green Bay Packers' minicamp practice on Thursday:

1. Veterans gone: For the final practice of the team's mandatory minicamp, coach Mike McCarthy excused all veterans with five or more years of experience. Without the 16 players that fit into that category, it gave the rookies and younger players more reps than they had received at any point previously in the offseason. But it meant this week's mandatory minicamp was essentially one day of football for the full squad because the Packers spent Wednesday at their annual team-building event, which this year was bowling.

"A lot of younger players got a lot of reps today that did not have the opportunity in the other practices," McCarthy said Thursday.

2. Tolzien shines: With Aaron Rodgers and Matt Flynn among those excused from practice, it gave young quarterbacks Scott Tolzien and Chase Rettig the chance to run the offense. For Tolzien, it was his first time getting starter reps since the weeks leading up to his two starts last season against the Giants and Vikings. Tolzien looked especially sharp in the red zone. On consecutive plays, he threw short touchdowns to his former University Wisconsin teammate Jared Abbrederis and tight end Brandon Bostick. The throw to Bostick was a perfectly thrown fade in the left corner of the end zone.

"I think any time that guys are relying on you and you're the first guy in the huddle, that's a big chance for you," Tolzien said. "But at the same time it shouldn't really change how you are. You should prepare like a starter every day."

3. Rettig's reps: Any reps for Rettig would have been more than normal given that the fourth quarterback on the depth chart rarely gets any work during team periods, so Thursday was big for the undrafted rookie from Boston College. There's no guarantee the Packers will take four quarterbacks to camp, but Rettig helped his cause with a few nice throws. He hit tight end Ryan Taylor in stride on a seam route and also connected with receiver Kevin Dorsey and tight end Richard Rodgers.

4. Changing duties: At one point during position drills, defensive line coach Mike Trgovac worked with the offensive linemen. A few yards away, offensive line coach James Campen ran the defensive line drill. That was something new this offseason, but it makes senses that a defensive line coach could give pointers to offensive linemen and vice versa.

5. Bradford's bat down: Rookie outside linebacker Carl Bradford made perhaps the most impressive defensive play of the practice when he batted down a pass attempt by Rettig on a two-point conversion try. The fourth-round pick from Arizona State showed his athletic ability by leaping and swatting the ball away with two hands.

6. Changing of the guard: With starting guards T.J. Lang and Josh Sitton among the veterans excused from practice, Don Barclay and Lane Taylor worked with the No. 1 offensive line. Barclay played left guard, while Taylor lined up on the right side. It showed how committed the Packers are to leaving Derek Sherrod at left tackle. As a rookie in 2011, Sherrod battled Lang for a starting job at guard. Instead, he remained as the backup left tackle.

7. Roll call, part 1: The 16 veterans excused on Thursday were: kicker Mason Crosby, cornerback Jarrett Bush, fullback John Kuhn, cornerback Tramon Williams, linebacker A.J. Hawk, linebacker Clay Matthews, linebacker/defensive end Julius Peppers, linebacker Brad Jones, long snapper Brett Goode, receiver Jordy Nelson, defensive tackle B.J. Raji, defensive tackle Letroy Guion, Flynn, Rodgers, Lang and Sitton.

8. Roll call, part 2: The following players attended practice but did not participate: receiver Chris Harper, cornerback Jumal Rolle, linebacker Nick Perry, tight end Andrew Quarless and defensive end Jerel Worthy. Running back Johnathan Franklin, who will be waived/injured on Friday because of a career-ending neck injury, was not present.
GREEN BAY, Wis. – Perhaps you've heard this before about the Green Bay Packers' defense: Everything will be fine as long as they're healthy.

The problem is – or has been – that they have not stayed healthy.

Last year, playmakers like Clay Matthews and Casey Hayward missed significant time because of injuries.

[+] EnlargeJamari Lattimore
Bruce Kluckhohn/USA TODAY SportsThe ability to fill various roles will likely earn LB Jamari Lattimore additional playing time in 2014.
The year before, it was Desmond Bishop, Nick Perry and Charles Woodson.

In the Super Bowl season of 2010, it was Nick Barnett and Morgan Burnett, among others.

Coach Mike McCarthy has apparently grown tired of watching his defense struggle when players go down. Simply plugging in replacement players and asking them to do the same jobs has not always worked.

To combat that, he and defensive coordinator Dom Capers have agreed on some changes.

At the root of those changes isn't necessarily Capers' scheme or whether it will continue to be his traditional 3-4 alignment in his base package, or a regular nickel or dime in sub packages. But rather, it is a plan to develop players who can play multiple positions in different defensive looks in order to better combat issues that could arise during the season.

The buzzwords appear to be these: More personnel, less scheme.

To be sure, there will be changes in scheme – some of which McCarthy does not want to discuss before he unveils it in the regular season. Some of them might even be a drastic departure from what Capers has done since he arrived in Green Bay in 2009 and throughout his career.

"We've learned some hard lessons here of late, the last couple years of maybe playing some players that probably weren't quite ready and because of a scheme [that] we were playing," McCarthy said after the Packers' first open OTA practice on Thursday.

The addition of veteran pass-rusher Julius Peppers by way of free agency provides a window to the changes. Peppers, who has been a traditional defensive end in a 4-3 scheme for most of his career, will play multiple positions for the Packers. During Thursday's OTA, he lined up almost exclusively as an outside linebacker in a two-point stance, but don't be surprised if he moves inside and rushes from a three-point stance as well. The same could be said for Perry and Mike Neal.

Likewise, there could be additional roles for the inside linebackers. While Brad Jones and A.J. Hawk do not appear to be in danger of losing their spots, Jamari Lattimore could see the field more, too. He was featured prominently during Thursday's practice in a variety of roles.

All of that could free up the cornerstone of the defense, Matthews, to move around more, too.

"It just seems like a lot of the linebackers have taken on roles that require them not only to be the traditional 3-4 linebacker or 4-3 [linebacker] but to do both," Matthews said. "Whether that's one minute rushing against a tackle or playing out on the slot receiver. Really, I think it just provides a lot of versatility for the guys we have here.

"I think rather than making players fit into certain schemes, we're making those schemes fit around players now. I think it's great for the personnel that we have and what we’re trying to accomplish moving forward."

It's an effort to reverse a trend that has seen the Packers finish in the bottom third of the defensive rankings in two of the past three seasons and struggle in a pair of playoff losses to the San Francisco 49ers to end the past two seasons.

"I think we have to change something," Hawk said. "Not change, but we have to evolve and hone in on who knows what our plan is going in once the season comes, but we need to find a way to play better. We need to find a way to get off the field. I don't think you have to make any crazy, drastic changes. I don't think that's what we're going to do. But you have to find a way to evaluate what we did wrong and find a way to get better at that."

Capers did something similar earlier in his career. When he took over as the Jacksonville Jaguars' defensive coordinator in 1999, he inherited a roster filled with players who better fit the 4-3 scheme they had run previously.

So instead of trying to force feed players a defense that did not suit their skills, he adjusted.

That season, the Jaguars gave up the fewest points in the NFL and the fourth-fewest yards.

"I hope it works as well as it did that year," Capers said. "We've done that, really, since we've been here. The first year we came in, there's a reason why Charles Woodson was the Defensive Player of the Year. He's a good player, and you do a lot of good things to feature your best players."

Packers offseason wrap-up

May, 22, 2014
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» NFC Wrap: East | West | North | South » AFC: East | West | North | South » Grades

With free agency and the draft in the rearview mirror and training camp just a couple months away, we assess the Green Bay Packers' offseason moves.

[+] EnlargeDom Capers
Jeff Hanisch/USA TODAY SportsDespite the Packers' defense ranking in the bottom third of the league at the end of the 2013 season, the team has decided to keep coordinator Dom Capers.
Best move: Sometimes, the best moves are ones that do not get made. In this case, not firing defensive coordinator Dom Capers, whose defense collapsed late last season, could prove to be the best thing the Packers did this offseason. Instead, he and coach Mike McCarthy spent several months examining every aspect of the Packers' scheme and personnel and made some changes that could turn out to be successful. They made a commitment to becoming more multiple rather than just playing base on first down, nickel on second down and dime on third down as they did so often last season. McCarthy said he and Capers have installed safeguards that will allow them to vary their defensive packages even if injuries hit as they did last season. That's a far better plan than junking everything Capers built over the past five years and starting over.

Riskiest move: Again, this is something the Packers did not do -- upgrade their inside linebackers. To be fair, the two players in the draft best suited to do that -- Ohio State's Ryan Shazier and Alabama's C.J. Mosley -- were gone by the time the Packers picked at No. 21 in the first round. Last year, the Packers stood pat at the safety position and hoped that they'd find a player among the returning group of M.D. Jennings, Jerron McMillian and Sean Richardson. It never happened, and the defense suffered because of it. Unless Jamari Lattimore or Sam Barrington made a big jump, it looks as though the Packers are going to stick with A.J. Hawk and Brad Jones on the inside.

Most surprising move: You can count on two things from general manager Ted Thompson -- he does not sign flashy, expensive free agents and he will always wheel and deal on draft weekend, usually to acquire more picks. Not anymore. Two months after Thompson wrote a check for a $7.5 million signing bonus to bring in pass-rusher Julius Peppers, he stood pat and used all nine of his original selections during the draft.

Most underrated move: For a team beset by injuries three of the past four seasons, perhaps the most important thing the Packers did this offseason was enter into an agreement with the tech firm Catapult Sports, which helps teams to compile data on athletic exertion as it relates to fatigue/preventable injuries. More than a dozen NFL teams are using Catapult or a similar GPS-based system to monitor players during practice.
Green Bay Packers general manager Ted Thompson says it every year -- and no doubt will say it again -- that he doesn't draft for need.

Then how do you explain why he used his first six picks in the 2012 NFL draft on defensive players following a season in which his team ranked last in the NFL in yards allowed?

There are no absolutes when it comes to picking players, but need has to factor in. With that in mind, in an ESPN Insider piece, draft expert Mel Kiper Jr. broke down the team-by-team needs heading into next month’s draft.

And there was little surprise when it came to his thoughts on the Packers. You can quibble with the order, but there's no doubt all four positions he listed qualify as needs.

Kiper listed the Packers' needs as:
  • Safety
  • Tight end
  • Receiver
  • Insider linebacker

The degree of need at safety could depend on how the Packers view second-year defensive back Micah Hyde. Coach Mike McCarthy has said several times this offseason that he wants Hyde on the field more this year. As a rookie, Hyde played almost exclusively in the slot as the nickel or dime defensive back. This year, his role will expand to include some safety.

"Free safety is a clear need," Kiper wrote. "And Morgan Burnett didn't set the world on fire last year either, so I could see the Packers targeting the position as early as Round 1. Calvin Pryor could be a fit."

The top tight end on the Packers' roster as it stands today is Andrew Quarless.

"I'd be surprised if they don't add another option here," Kiper wrote.

The Packers have a top-notch duo at receiver in Randall Cobb and Jordy Nelson and they are high on Jarrett Boykin but after losing James Jones in free agency, they could use another receiver.

"The depth chart could use some help, and certainly some size," Kiper said.

At inside linebacker, veteran A.J. Hawk, a former first-round pick, seems entrenched, but the other starter, Brad Jones, could face some competition.

"I have some concerns about how well they can cover underneath from the linebacker position," Kiper said.
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- With the bulk of the free-agent work done, it's a good time to recheck the Green Bay Packers' depth chart leading up to the May 8-10 NFL draft.

On Thursday, we broke down the way things look on offense.

Next up is the defense:

Defensive end: Datone Jones, Josh Boyd, Jerel Worthy.

[+] EnlargeDatone Jones
AP Photo/Morry GashThe Packers are counting on defensive end Datone Jones to rebound in his second season.
Analysis: The Packers have high hopes for Jones despite a disappointing rookie season in which the former first-round pick was slowed by an ankle injury and recorded just 3.5 sacks (two of which came in one game). "I feel he's one of those second-year players who [can] take a huge jump," coach Mike McCarthy said of Jones earlier this offseason. "That will be my expectations for him." Boyd, a fifth-round pick, actually saw more playing time late last season than Jones. Worthy played in only two games a year after he blew out his knee.

Defensive tackle: B.J. Raji, Mike Daniels, Letroy Guion.

Analysis: Moving Raji back to nose tackle on a full-time basis should help his production, which declined sharply over the last three years following a move to defensive end. Daniels was perhaps the team's most improved player last season, which should lead to an even bigger role this season. Guion, who was cut the Minnesota Vikings, will have to battle for a roster spot.

Elephant: Julius Peppers, Nick Perry, Mike Neal.

Analysis: Elephant is a catch-all term for the multiple positions this trio will play. They will be part outside linebacker, part defensive end and part defensive tackle. The addition of Peppers, who was signed last month after being released by the Chicago Bears, should boost the pass rush. Expect Perry to play more on the right side this season, where he was far more impactful last season. These players will actually be tutored by linebackers coach Winston Moss.

Inside linebacker: A.J. Hawk, Brad Jones, Jamari Lattimore, Sam Barrington, Victor Aiyewa.

Analysis: Hawk had perhaps his best season last year, but Jones was a disappointment after signing a three-year, $11.75 million contract and could be on shaky ground for a starting job. Lattimore, a restricted free agent who has yet to sign his tender, got some playing time last year while Jones was hurt and could push for the starting job. So could Barrington, a promising rookie who missed the second half of the season because of a hamstring injury.

Outside linebacker: Clay Matthews, Andy Mulumba, Nate Palmer, Chase Thomas.

Analysis: Neal and Perry played almost exclusively at outside linebacker last season, so there's a good chance they'll be a big part of this group again. But behind Matthews are a couple of second-year players, Mulumba and Palmer, who played more than anyone expected last year as a rookies. Mulumba, an undrafted free agent, played better than Palmer, a sixth-round pick. Thomas was signed early in the offseason off the street after spending most of last season on the Atlanta Falcons' practice squad.

Safeties: Morgan Burnett, Sean Richardson, Chris Banjo.

Analysis: Easily the thinnest position on the roster, there's still likely to be several additions here, probably via the draft. However, McCarthy said cornerback Micah Hyde will get some work at safety. Whether he's a candidate to start next to Burnett (a strong safety), however, remains to be seen. Burnett needs to bounce back from a disappointing season, but there's little reason to think his job is in jeopardy. Richardson returned late last season from a serious neck injury and showed promise. Banjo played more early in the season than he did late last year.

Cornerbacks: Sam Shields, Tramon Williams, Casey Hayward, Micah Hyde, Jarrett Bush, Davon House, James Nixon, Jumel Rolle, Antonio Dennard.

Analysis: This is among the Packers' deepest positions thanks to the return of Shields, who signed a four-year, $39 million contract, and Hayward, who is expected to be healthy after a hamstring injury limited him to just three games last season. Williams closed the season playing perhaps as well as he did during the Super Bowl season of 2010, which is why they kept him despite a $7.5 million salary. Bush had his best season in coverage last year, while House was a disappointment. Nixon's speed makes him an intriguing prospect. Rolle was promoted from the practice squad late last season, while Dennard joined the practice squad late last season.

Analyzing Kiper 3.0: Packers

March, 13, 2014
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A month ago, it looked like there was little to no chance the Green Bay Packers would have a shot at Alabama linebacker C.J. Mosley at No. 21 in the first round of the draft.

In fact, in his Mock Draft 2.0, Mel Kiper Jr. predicted Mosley would go to the New York Giants at No. 12.

That was before issues arose about Mosley's health. However, he said recently at Alabama's pro day that he has repeatedly checked out fine.

Nevertheless, Kiper has dropped Mosley significantly in his Mock Draft 3.0, which was released Thursday. Kiper believes that if Mosley is indeed available to the Packers at No. 21, they will take him.

His range and ability to cover and tackle would appear to be a good fit for the Packers, who need to upgrade their inside linebacker productivity. While A.J. Hawk had perhaps his best season, the Packers were disappointed with what they got out of Brad Jones at the other inside spot.

Kiper wrote: "... while I know depth on the defensive line is a concern, Mosley is a great value at this point and is a player who can step in right away at inside linebacker and improve the unit. His ability in coverage from the linebacker position surpasses that of anybody in this draft, and if he can stay healthy, he's going to be an impact player early on."

It's interesting to note that Kiper has Louisville safety Calvin Pryor going one spot after the Packers pick, at No. 22 to the Philadelphia Eagles. Perhaps the Packers' greatest need is at safety.
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- Early indications were the Green Bay Packers didn't intend to offer linebacker Jamari Lattimore a restricted free-agent tender.

However on Tuesday, Lattimore's agent, Tony Agnone, said the team informed him that they will place the low restricted free-agent tender on the fourth-year linebacker.

That tender, should Lattimore sign it, is worth $1.431 million.

Until he signs it, Lattimore would be free to talk to other teams. The Packers would have the right to match any offer he received but if they chose not to, they would not receive compensation in return.

Last season, Lattimore showed flashes in four starts while Brad Jones was injured. If Lattimore returns, he could be in a position to challenge Jones for the starting job.

The Packers have one other restricted free agent, safety M.D. Jennings. There has been no indication he has received a tender offer, and it's widely known the Packers want to upgrade their safety position.

Update: The Packers did not tender restricted free agent safety M.D. Jennings, meaning he is free to sign with any team.

Countdown to combine: Packers part 3

February, 19, 2014
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GREEN BAY, Wis. -- As we head toward the NFL scouting combine, which starts Wednesday in Indianapolis, it’s a good time to look at the Green Bay Packers' greatest needs this offseason and which prospects general manager Ted Thompson might be taking a closer look at during workouts and interviews this week.

Which position is the greatest need could be debated, but there’s no arguing that it’s on the defensive side of the ball. Before things get underway at Lucas Oil Stadium, we’ll look at three areas on defense where the Packers need help.

Monday was dedicated to the safety position. On Tuesday, we looked at the defensive linemen.

We’ll wrap up the defensive side of the ball with the linebacker spots, both inside and outside.

Why the Packers need help: If the Packers are going to field a defense that at all resembles the units fielded by the NFC’s top two teams -- the Seattle Seahawks and San Francisco 49ers -- they need to upgrade their linebackers. Specifically, they need more speed both on the outside and up the middle.

The Packers seem satisfied with A.J. Hawk but might be looking to upgrade the other inside spot, which was occupied most of last season by Brad Jones. The Packers gave Jones a three-year, $11.75 million deal that included a $3 million signing bonus.

On the outside, they continued their search for someone to complement Clay Matthews. Mike Neal’s conversion from defensive end went perhaps better than could have been expected. He had five sacks, including four in the last seven games, but is scheduled to be a free agent next month. For the second straight season, Nick Perry (a first-round pick in 2012) battled injuries and still hasn’t shown whether he’s a natural fit at outside linebacker.

Linebackers the Packers should be watching:

Chris Borland, Wisconsin: Probably the second-best inside linebacker in the draft behind Alabama’s C.J. Mosley, who almost certainly won’t be around when the Packers pick at No. 21. The only issue with Borland is that he’s a tad short at 5-foot-11, so he will need to have an impressive showing at the combine and his pro day in order to convince the Packers he can be effective.

Ryan Shazier, Ohio State: With the top two outside linebackers -- Buffalo’s Khalil Mack and UCLA’s Anthony Barr -- likely being top-10 picks, Shazier might be the best remaining option. But there are questions about whether he can rush the passer.

Michael Sam, Missouri: After revealing earlier this month that he is gay, Sam will be perhaps the most scrutinized player at the combine. Projected as a mid-round pick, teams will have to decide whether he can make the adjustment from defensive end to outside linebacker.

Green Bay Packers season wrap-up

January, 8, 2014
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Arrow indicates direction team is trending.

Final Power Ranking: 13
Preseason Power Ranking: 5

Biggest surprise: How many people would have believed the Packers could win the NFC North without the services of Aaron Rodgers for seven-plus games? Maybe it was an indictment on the rest of the division but the fact that the Packers used four different starting quarterbacks this season and went 2-5-1 after Rodgers broke his collarbone on Nov. 4, and they still won the division by beating the Chicago Bears in Week 17, when Rodgers returned, could not have been expected. The saga of when Rodgers would return from his injury dominated the second half of the season.

Biggest disappointment: When general manager Ted Thompson drafted Datone Jones with the 26th overall pick in April, he thought he was getting a defensive lineman who could play on all three downs and would be equally effective against the run and rushing the quarterback. In training camp, Jones looked the part. He stood out in practices, but when it came time to produce, he couldn't deliver. By the end of the season, Jones' playing time was reduced to almost nothing. Fifth-round pick Josh Boyd was playing more snaps than Jones late in the year. Jones finished with 3.5 sacks but two came in one game.

Biggest need: The Packers have many, and they're most on the defensive side of the ball. Their entire starting defensive line -- B.J. Raji, Ryan Pickett and Johnny Jolly -- will be unrestricted free agents. Other than A.J. Hawk, they are weak at inside linebacker. And their safety play was atrocious at times. They don't just need contributors; they need playmakers on that side of the ball. Other than outside linebacker Clay Matthews and perhaps cornerbacks Sam Shields and Tramon Williams, they didn't have many big-play players on defense. Their needs are so great that Thompson, the free-agent averse GM, might not be able to rely solely on the draft to fill them all.

Team MVP: Rodgers is clearly the Packers' most important player, but this honor should go to someone who played the majority of the season. In that case, it has to be running back Eddie Lacy. It has to be rare for a rookie to be a team's MVP, but then again the second-round draft pick from Alabama proved to be a rare talent. Despite missing nearly two full games because of a concussion and half of another game because a sprained ankle, Lacy finished eighth in the league in rushing with 1,178 yards (a Packers' rookie record) and had the second-most rushing touchdowns with 11.

 
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- For the past three weeks, the only practice reps Green Bay Packers running back Eddie Lacy took came last Friday and even those were limited and not in pads.

Lacy
So the fact that Lacy was back on the field for Thursday's practice is a good indication that his sprained right ankle has improved.

Lacy was officially listed as a limited participant, but he was in full pads and might be as healthy as he's been at midweek since he was injured in the Dec. 8 game against the Atlanta Falcons.

“Eddie looked good,” Packers coach Mike McCarthy said after practice. “He was limited in practice [but had a] good day's work.”

It's possible the Packers could rest Lacy on Friday to make sure he's fresh for Sunday's NFC wild-card playoff game against the San Francisco 49ers.

Here's the full injury report:
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- The Green Bay Packers are about as healthy as they have been in months heading into Sunday’s NFC wild-card playoff game against the San Francisco 49ers.

Matthews
The only player not at practice on Thursday was outside linebacker Clay Matthews, who already has been ruled out because of his thumb injury.

The other 52 players on the roster all took part in the full-pads practice.

Running back Eddie Lacy (ankle) practiced on a Thursday for the first time since he sprained his right ankle on Dec. 8 against the Atlanta Falcons. The past three weeks, Lacy had been practicing only on Fridays.

Banged-up linebackers Brad Jones (ankle), Mike Neal (abdomen), and Nick Perry (foot) all practiced.

The Packers don’t appear to be limiting quarterback Aaron Rodgers and Randall Cobb, who returned last Sunday after lengthy absences. Neither was even listed on Wednesday’s injury report.

The full injury report will be available after practice.

Packers inactives: Cobb good to go

December, 29, 2013
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CHICAGO -- The Green Bay Packers did not add Randall Cobb to the 53-man roster on Saturday so that he could sit on the bench. A day after he came off the temporary injured reserve list, Cobb will play against the Chicago Bears.

It will be his first action since he broke the tibia in his right leg on Oct. 13 against the Baltimore Ravens.

With the return of Aaron Rodgers from his Nov. 4 broken collarbone, the Packers kept all three quarterbacks – Rodgers, Matt Flynn and Scott Tolzien – active.

The only surprise on the inactive list was linebacker Brad Jones. He was listed as probable on the injury report after he returned to practice on Friday, albeit on a limited basis because of an ankle injury. Jamari Lattimore will start in Jones’ place.

At outside linebacker, rookie Andy Mulumba and Mike Neal will be the starters in place of Clay Matthews (thumb) and Nick Perry, who is active.

Defensive end Jerel Worthy is active for only the second time since coming off the physically unable to perform list on Nov. 23.

Here’s the full inactive list:

Practice report: No issues for Rodgers

December, 27, 2013
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GREEN BAY, Wis. -- For the first time in a month, this should be a low-stress Friday in terms of the Green Bay Packers’ quarterback situation.

Rodgers
Rodgers
Aaron Rodgers took all the first team reps during the portion of practice that was open to reporters, meaning there were no setbacks after it was announced on Thursday that he would return from his broken collarbone to start Sunday’s game against the Chicago Bears.

Will running back Eddie Lacy (ankle) and receiver Randall Cobb (tibia) join him?

Both were on the practice field Friday, although Lacy appeared limited. Cobb’s reps appeared to increase for the second straight day, and there’s a chance he could be activated off the injured reserve/designated to return list.

Linebacker Brad Jones (ankle) and tight end Ryan Taylor (illness) returned to practice.

The Packers were thin on outside linebackers with Clay Matthews (thumb) already ruled out and Mike Neal (abdomen) and Nick Perry (foot) in street clothes. Neal and Perry practiced on Thursday, so it’s possible they were just being held out as a precaution. Tight end Jake Stoneburner, who was not listed on the injury report, also did not practice.

The full injury report with status designations for Sunday's game will be available after practice.

Injury report: Cobb takes another step

December, 26, 2013
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GREEN BAY, Wis. -- Believe it or not, there was significant injury news to come out of the Green Bay Packers on Thursday that wasn’t Aaron Rodgers-related.

While coach Mike McCarthy announced on Thursday that Rodgers was preparing to make his return on Sunday against the Chicago Bears, receiver Randall Cobb moved a step closer to doing the same. If all goes well during Cobb's medical checkup on Friday, that, too, could happen Sunday against the Bears.

Cobb remains on the injured reserve/designated to return list because of the broken right tibia he sustained on Oct. 13, but he practiced in pads Thursday for the first time since his injury. Cobb returned to practice on a limited basis last week.

“I think Tuesday and today was the first day that I actually did some cutting and didn’t think about it,” Cobb said after practice. “That’s definitely progress, and that’s definitely confidence to me, for me, in my knee. I think that’s very important for the next step.”

Cobb often has referred to his injury as his knee because his tibia fracture was just below the knee.

The Packers would have to add Cobb on the roster by Saturday in order for him to play Sunday, but they currently have two open roster spots that have gone unfilled since defensive tackle Johnny Jolly (neck) and tight end Brandon Bostick (foot) were placed on injured reserve last week.

“I feel a lot better now than probably I did this morning,” McCarthy said of Cobb after Thursday’s practice. “He definitely took a step in that direction.”

At the time of his injury, Cobb was the Packers’ leading receiver with 29 catches for 378 yards through five games.

Here’s the full injury report:

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