NFC North: Danny Amendola

Following the lead of New England Patriots receiver Danny Amendola, Green Bay Packers tight end Jermichael Finley will make a contribution to a Boston charity for every reception -- and dropped pass -- in 2013. Here is Finley's announcement, with an appropriate level of dark humor as well:
Amendola pledged $100 for every reception and $200 for every drop, but it's only fair to note that Amendola dropped one pass (in 96 targets) last season for the St. Louis Rams, according to ESPN Stats & Information. As every Packers fan can tell you, Finley had much more difficulty hanging onto the ball; ESPN Stats & Information had him with six drops in 85 targets.

Plenty of athletes and private citizens will make do what they can to help those impacted by the Boston Marathon tragedy. Not all of those efforts will be chronicled on the NFC North blog. I just thought the self-deprecating nature of Finley's gesture was worth noting. So I did.
The financial details of Dwayne Bowe's contract agreement with the Kansas City Chiefs give us a better framework for discussion of top-flight receivers in the NFC North.

According to Ian Rapoport of the NFL Network, among others, Bowe received a five-year deal worth $56 million, with $26 million guaranteed. That's a notch higher than last year's free-agent benchmark: $55 million over five years for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' Vincent Jackson, with similar guarantees.

Those figures help you understand why the Green Bay Packers either haven't been able, or haven't tried, to re-sign pending free agent Greg Jennings, who turns 30 in September. It also illustrates why it's difficult to predict where the Minnesota Vikings will go with their multi-pronged needs and challenges at the position.

As you know, Percy Harvin is entering the final year of his contract. It's safe to assume he will eye Bowe's contract as a framework for an extension. Those of you who would like to see the Vikings sign Jennings or the Pittsburgh Steelers' Mike Wallace, the top two free-agent receivers available, should ask if you think they would dole out two deals that average more than $11 million annually for receivers.

If you consider that scenario unlikely, you're probably right. You wonder if the Vikings' likeliest path is to either commit to Harvin or sign a free agent -- but not both -- while also hoping to address the position in the draft. When you look at the second tier of free-agent receivers, you realize that many of them would play the same slot role as Harvin -- Wes Welker, Danny Amendola and Donnie Avery among them.

Regardless, we now have a better idea of what it will cost for the Vikings either to satisfy Harvin and/or add a top veteran to the mix. In short: A lot.

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