Eugene Robinson calls agreement 'huge'

August, 29, 2013
8/29/13
7:26
PM ET
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Former NFL safety Eugene Robinson called the $765 million settlement the league reached with retired players suffering from concussion-related brain injuries "a huge deal."

Now a member of the Carolina Panthers' radio broadcast team, Robinson said he suffered at least two concussions he was aware of during his career from 1985 to 2000 with Seattle, Green Bay, Atlanta and Carolina.

He said that as recently as two years ago, he went to a neurologist in Raleigh, N.C., because of "a little memory loss" he associated with the concussions. Robinson was not a part of the lawsuit filed by more than 4,500 ex-players.

"I was up there like eight hours," Robinson told ESPN.com of his visit to the neurologist. "She would read me a story. I could tell her the beginning and the end. But the middle part, I had no clue."

A three-time Pro Bowl selection, Robinson said his first concussion occurred in the early 1990s when he was with the Seahawks playing the Cardinals.

"I saw stars," he said. "I got kicked in the side of the head. As I was getting up, I saw those little stars and I just knew I was going to go out, and I called the signals. I went out.

"[Then] I looked and there was 1:28 on the clock in the first quarter. I said, 'What's 1:28? What's 1:28?' They said, 'Hey, call a play.' I said, 'Oh, my goodness, I'm in a football game.'"

Robinson, 50, said he knows several players whose careers were affected by concussions, including former Panthers linebacker Dan Morgan. Morgan, now the assistant director of pro personnel for Seattle, had at least five reported concussions dating back to his college days at Miami that factored into his retiring in 2008 after only seven NFL seasons.

Robinson said "there's no doubt" the settlement was huge for those involved but added that just how huge will depend on where it leads.

David Newton | email

ESPN Carolina Panthers reporter

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