Halftime notes: Falcons holding their own

December, 8, 2013
12/08/13
2:00
PM ET
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- The temperature was in single digits by the time the Atlanta Falcons and Green Bay Packers kicked off at Lambeau Field. Behind the passing of Matt Ryan, the running of Steven Jackson and a key turnover forced by safety William Moore, the Falcons lead at halftime, 21-10.

Kick start: One of the most unbelievable plays of the season occurred at the end of the first half. Falcons linebacker Sean Weatherspoon returned an interception 71 yards for a touchdown after the ball bounced off teammate Paul Worrilow's foot. Many of the Packers thought the ball hit the ground, so give Weatherspoon credit for keeping the play alive and running with the ball. He even made a nice running back-style cut to get past slow-footed Packers guard T.J. Lang. It was definitely a "SportsCenter" top-10 play. And it will be talked about in the locker room all week, based on how vocal Weatherspoon is.

Finding rhythm: Ryan completed nine of his first 10 passes for 85 yards and two touchdowns. He promised leading into the game that he wouldn't allow the weather to consume him and promised the play without a glove on his throwing hand. Ryan continues to find Roddy White for key third-down conversions.

In the running: Jackson has helped Ryan by establishing the running game and giving the offense some balance. Jackson gained 55 yards on his first nine carries, including a 22-yard run. One side note, Jackson said he considered signing with the Packers in the offseason.

Injury update: Starting free safety Thomas DeCoud suffered a head injury and is out for the remainder of the game. Although the last thing the Falcons need is another injury, DeCoud being out allows the coaches to take a longer look at rookie Zeke Motta, who has been primarily a special-teamer. Motta made a nice tackle on one play but also slipped in coverage on an 18-yard pass play from Matt Flynn to Jordy Nelson.

Vaughn McClure

ESPN Atlanta Falcons reporter

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