Dimitroff has talked to teams about trades

April, 30, 2014
Apr 30
2:50
PM ET
FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. -- Atlanta Falcons general manager Thomas Dimitroff said he has discussed trade scenarios with other teams in preparation for this year’s NFL draft, although Dimitroff declined to discuss which teams he reached out to

The Falcons currently hold the sixth pick overall, and Dimitroff continues to express a willingness to trade up or down. He believes no team wants to trade out of the top 10, which would indicate the Falcons likely being more inclined to remain at No. 6 or trade up.

"I’ve talked to many teams about many things," Dimitroff said. "Obviously, trade situations come up. Tis the season for that, as you can imagine. I think the biggest thing for that is to make sure you’re getting an idea of what compensation would be if, in fact, something ever came to fruition during the draft. That’s how we did it back in [2011]. I think that’s the important thing whether you travel down that road or now -- it’s important to make sure you’re gauging what compensation might be."

When asked specifically if he had discussed trade scenarios with the Houston Texans, who own the No. 1 pick, Dimitroff declined to speak specifics.

"I don’t want to talk about the teams that I’ve spoken with," Dimitroff said. "Suffice to say there have been some interesting discussions."

There has been speculation about the Falcons wanting to trade up to the No. 1 overall pick to secure South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney, the most athletically gifted player in the draft. The Falcons, however, could target a different pass-rusher in Buffalo outside linebacker Khalil Mack or go after one of the top three offensive tackles: Auburn’s Greg Robinson, Texas A&M’s Jake Matthews, and Michigan’s Taylor Lewan.

In 2011, Dimitroff surrendered five draft picks to the Cleveland Browns to move up from the 27th overall pick to No. 6 and select game-changing receiver Julio Jones.

Vaughn McClure

ESPN Atlanta Falcons reporter

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