NFC West: Justin Blalock

Mailbag: Chiefs-Rams trade idea

March, 14, 2010
3/14/10
8:00
AM ET
Tom from Orange County, Calif., writes: Mike, longtime Rams fan. Thanks for the coverage. Trade question for you: What do you think about Adam Carriker and the 33rd pick to Kansas City for Glenn Dorsey? Both players have not lived up to expectations and are playing out of position. Each could use a change of scenery.

Dorsey gives the Rams the potential game-changing tackle that they need, and justifies the Sam Bradford pick at No. 1. Carriker gives Kansas City the end the Chiefs need in the 3-4, and what is turning out to be a very valuable 33rd pick. Thanks for taking the question.

Mike Sando: Good thinking, Tom. I don't know if the Rams would value Dorsey high enough to make that move, but if they thought he could basically be close to Ndamukong Suh or Gerald McCoy, why not? The quick reaction would be to dismiss any such comparisons, claiming Suh and McCoy are much better prospects. But a lot of prospects look better before they line up against NFL players week after week. Dorsey was considered a top-five talent when he entered the draft.

Here is what Scouts Inc. said about Dorsey when he was coming out of college:

"A squatty defensive tackle prospect with a thick build and very good quickness. Anticipates the snap well, explodes out of his stance and generally will win one-on-one battles with his initial burst. He plays with a non-stop motor. Stays active, using swim and rip moves to get off of blocks when necessary. Displays good upper-body power and the ability to knock linemen back on their heels with initial pop. Does a fine job of locating the ball once he's in the backfield and flashes good change-of-direction skills for his position. A powerful tackler when he can line up a hit. Also does a better job of taking on blocks in the run game than he gets credit for. He can be washed out by some bigger OL, but generally does a good job of staying low and holding his ground when asked to."



Durability concerns were singled out as the primary weakness. Dorsey has played in 31 of 32 games with the Chiefrs, starting 30 of them. The Scouts Inc. report said Dorsey would fit best in a one-gap scheme that would allow him to get upfield and disrupt offenses. The Rams are running that type of scheme. The Chiefs are not. You're right in suggesting that Carriker could fit better at end in a 3-4 scheme. Durability is a big concern with him, but that 33rd overall choice would have to tempt the Chiefs.


Michael From Lynchburg, Va., writes: Why or what is Seattle waiting on? They need running backs, defensive backs, offensive linemen, a wide receiver, but no movement. Is the draft going to be their best bet?

I have been a fan since 1983, and since then I have seen draft pick after draft pick be a bust. Thomas Jones would have been good for us. Chester Taylor could have helped and Brandon Marshall would definitely be an upgrade from Deion Branch and Nate Burleson. I think Darren Sharper or Antrel Rolle would have been good for us, or Anquan Boldin at wide receiver. I would just be happy with some kind of movement.

Mike Sando: It's human nature for fans to crave action once the signing period begins, but a lot of money has been spent foolishly in free agency over the years. The Redskins will be paying a $21 million bonus to Albert Hayensworth shortly and he might not even fit the scheme they are implementing.

It's also human nature for general manager and coach to undervalue the players they inherit. The Seahawks' previous leadership might have been more aggressive in keeping Burleson. I also think former general manager Tim Ruskell would have been more aggressive in free agency. That doesn't mean being aggressive in free agency would have necessarily served the team well, however.

This was a very weak free-agent class packed with aging, declining veterans. As I tweeted Saturday, there were 156 unrestricted free agents left and 139 would be 30 or older come September.

Seattle did finally add a tight end in Chris Baker (not a UFA, but rather a player whose contract was terminated). I thought the Seahawks might have been a little more aggressive in this signing period, given their needs and coach Pete Carroll's desire to improve quickly. But I also realize Carroll and general manager John Schneider want to go young. That's tough to do through free agency when so many of the younger players failed to hit the market as UFAs thanks to the current labor situation.

The team will probably sign an offensive lineman or two. Ben Hamilton could make sense. He lost his job in Denver largely because the Broncos were changing to a scheme that did not fit him. The Seahawks are adopting the scheme Hamilton ran for years.

The Marshall situation could take time to play out. There's no sense in the Seahawks bidding against themselves. They can afford to wait on that one, probably.


Edward from Tempe writes: Sando, you mentioned in your NFC West Draft Watch that selecting Alan Branch in 2007 was a mistake; he was the first selection in the second round that year. He missed a few games his first year but then played the remainder. He might not be what the Cardinals had hoped, but do you see him more now as a situational position player? I mean, he has shown some signs of life this past year, so maybe not all is lost.

Mike Sando: Drafting Branch didn't give the Cardinals a reliable nose tackle. The pick was a "mistake" from that standpoint. He did show some promise playing defensive end. All is not lost. And when you look at the players drafted immediately after Branch that year -- Paul Posluszny, Arron Sears, Kevin Kolb, Eric Weddle, Zach Miller, Justin Blalock, John Beck, Chris Houston, Tony Ugoh, Drew Stanton -- it's not like all were home runs.


Scott from Maryland writes: Do you think the Niners could trade away their 17th pick this year and first-rounder next year to the Browns for their first-rounder? If the Rams take Sam Bradford, there could be a good chance that Eric Berry falls to the Browns' pick. However, the Browns have so many holes and Mike Holmgren is familiar with the Niners. I think it could benefit both teams.

Mike Sando: Would that be the best use of draft capital for the 49ers, though? They would have no first-rounder in 2011, just to move up 10 spots? I wouldn't give away that future pick.


Joe stationed in Germany writes: Sando, love the blog. One of the best sources of info on the net. Please keep up the great work. With the Colts releasing Ryan Lilja, can the 49ers maybe use him? I know we really need an offensive tackle, but seems they are in need of depth and talent on the offensive line over all. I Think Lilja has proved the injury is better after a full season of starting and he has experience. My only concern is that the Colts were not a running team, but he has got to be a good pass protector. That and I was hoping for something better than David Carr for us in the free agency. Just some thoughts. What do you think?

Mike Sando: Thanks for the support, Joe, and your service. Lilja doesn't fit the 49ers' profile for offensive linemen because he's a smaller guy, listed at about 290 pounds. I just don't see him fitting what they want. At quarterback, the 49ers decided to trade what they knew -- Shaun Hill -- for a bit of a wild card in Carr. I understand their desire to shake up the position. They had tried Hill and decided he wouldn't be the starter. Could they have done better than Carr? I'm with you a little bit. Not expecting very good things from him.


Cal from Daly City, Calif., writes: What are the NFL rules on signing multiple restricted free agents? if a team wanted to, could they sign two RFAs, both with a first-round tender attached? If so, how do they work out the draft picks involved?

Mike Sando: A team could sign more than one RFA only if it had its own first-round choice and a better first-round choice available as compensation.


Blazzinhawk from Spokane, Wash., writes: Why not trade Deion Branch and the 14th to denver for Brandon Marshall and a third-rounder? Sounds good to me.

Mike Sando: My initial thoughts also focused on a way for Seattle to recoup a third-round choice, given that the team does not own one. Your proposal would allow the Broncos to get back their own first-rounder as well. Your proposal assumes the Broncos would do such a deal. I think Seattle might be waiting to see if the price is lower.


Eri from Los Angeles writes: What would you say percentage-wise is the Rams' chances of landing Michael Vick? And why do I hear Donovan McNabb as an option for the Rams as well?

Mike Sando: Looks like the Vick-to-St. Louis chatter has gone away. I wonder if the pending ownership change has diminished the team's interest. On McNabb, I still do not believe Andy Reid wants to trade him.


Jerry from Mishawaka, Ind., writes: Mike, I've read that Denver is not negotiating with any team to trade Brandon Marshall. If that's the case, then Seattle should find a team from the 12 to 23 range to trade the sixth overall pick to for that team's first-round pick and a second- or third-round pick, depending on the value of that team's first-round pick.

Then sign Marshall to an offer sheet. Denver gets the pick it wants for him, Seattle comes out on top with Marshall and the Seahawks don't have to pay the cash for a sixth overall player, plus Seattle still has three picks in the first three rounds , and the team that got that sixth pick could get a player to replace what they lost.

Green Bay comes to mind in this scenario becaause most GMs like to work out trades with their former teams. Also, Green Bay could use the sixth overall pick to draft a defensive end to replace Kampan. What are your thoughts?

Mike Sando: The effort is appreciated, but there would be a few problems with such a scenario. One, rules require teams to possess their own pick or a better pick in the relevant round before signing a restricted free agent. Two, most teams would rather pick 12th through 23rd instead of sixth. Third, Green Bay in particular wouldn't want to move up that high, in my view. Their general manager, Ted Thompson, seems to prefer moving back to add picks (the Packers have drafted a league-high 51 players since Thompson took over in 2005).


Michael from Midland, Texas writes: Hey Sando, As an avid 49ers fan in the heart of Cowboys country, I just want to thank you for your solid coverage of the 9ers. I just wanted to bounce some ideas off of you in terms of draft/free agent acquisitions.

By my way of thinking, the 49ers have three key needs to make them a playoff contender: right Tackle, inside linebacker to pair with Patrick Willis and a cornerback to start opposite Shawntae Spencer. I know a lot of talking is being made of finding a dynamic return man, but I consider that more of a luxury than an absolute need.

Anyway, enough preamble. My actual question is, what do you think are the chances of the 49ers emerging from the first two rounds of the draft with some combo of Trent Williams/Bruce Campbell/Mike Iupati, Eric Berry/Taylor Mays and Devin McCourty/Kareem Jackson?

Also, do you know if the 49ers are taking any looks at Larry Foote or Pisa Tinoisamoa? Seems like either of those guys would be a good fit at will linebacker for the 49ers and we could probably get them relatively cheap.

Mike Sando: Thanks for the support. Good questions, too. Would Foote be better than Takeo Spikes at this point? That could be a consideration. Tinoisamoa seems too small to fit in a 3-4 defense. He goes about 230 pounds.

I could see Williams and possibly even Iupati. Berry would seemingly be gone by the time the 49ers selected. Mays could be there, but I'm not sure where teams are going to value him. He seems like a higher-risk player, but the measurables could appeal from a pure personnel standpoint.

The corners you mentioned sound promising. Jackson would be the bigger of the two, and that could be important to the 49ers. San Francisco is past due to draft a cornerback somewhere relatively early. General manager Scot McCloughan's teams haven't drafted a cornerback in the first two rounds since 2003 (Marcus Trufant, when McCloughan was with Seattle).

Don't forget about quarterback as a potential need, too. Alex Smith and David Carr aren't exactly perennial Pro Bowl players.


Mike from Seattle writes: Hey Mike, just wanted to say keep up the good work and I really appreciate on how quickly you update your stuff. Well, I have a quick question that you can clear up for me. I thought Mike Holmgren was hired to be the president of football operations, and he retained the current coaching staff. I was just curious why he made a trade for Seneca Wallace, unless he wants him at Wildcat. I was just wondering why there are articles that was written that Holmgren wanted Seneca because he knows the offense.

Mike Sando: I keep forgetting that Holmgren isn't coaching the team and I have a feeling I'm not the only one. Holmgren is a coach at heart. I even asked him at the combine how in the world he would be able to watch another coach run practice. He joked about having hired two security guards to restrain him in case his instincts take over and he feels the urge to run out there and blow a whistle.

Holmgren does want the Browns to run his offense. His offensive coordinator in Seattle, Gil Haskell, is already onboard in Cleveland. One of his other trusted offensive coaches, Keith Gilbertson, is also there. None of us should be surprised if Holmgren is coaching the team in another year or two.


Ryan from Puyallup, Wash., writes: Hey Sando, here's a kicker question for ya. Are the Cardinals planning on moving on from Neil Rackers? he's a free agent and I figured the cardinals would have resigned him. Minus the playoffs, where I belive his groin injury was still affecting him, he is a really good, reliable kicker. You think that they are just planning on drafting a kicker in the late rounds?

Mike Sando: The Cardinals would probably go in another direction if Rackers demanded a lucrative deal. Coach Ken Whisenhunt was clearly not happy with Rackers' injury situation in the playoffs, indicating he thought Rackers was healthier than Rackers wound up being. Re-signing Rackers does not appear to be a priority, although I think he could come back for the right price.
Draft Round Pick Devaney's Team Tackle College Conference
2003 1 26
49ers Kwame Harris Stanford
Pac-10
2007
2 39 Falcons Justin Blalock
Texas Big 12
1991
2 47 Chargers Eric Moten
Michigan St.
Big Ten
1994
2 63 Chargers
Vaughn Parker
UCLA Pac-10
2008
3 65 Rams John Greco
Toledo MAC
2000
3 83 Chargers Damion McIntosh
Kansas St.
Big 12
2006
5 139 Falcons Quinn Ojinnaka
Syracuse Big East
1992
5 140 Chargers Eric Jonassen
Bloomsburg [Division II]
1991
6 150 Chargers Jimmy Laister
Oregon T
ech
[NAIA]
1995
6 200 Chargers
Tony Berti
Colorado
Big 12

Posted by ESPN.com's Mike Sando

An invigorating (by my standards) conversation with Steve Muench of Scouts Inc. provided grounds to revisit recent items profiling NFC West general managers' draft tendencies. Steve and I started with Rams GM Billy Devaney and the offensive tackles his teams have drafted since he broke into the NFL with the Chargers in 1990.

The previous item featured the above chart and some initial thoughts. This followup item will combine what I know about the Rams with what Muench knows about the college prospects. I watched every game involving an NFC West team last season, charting thousands of plays along the way. Muench watched -- and he continues to watch -- the college propsects. The hope here is to combine what we know to better analyze how NFC West teams could and should proceed in the 2009 draft.

Steve and I thought the Rams, draft board permitting, might be wise to target offensive tackle in the first round, receiver in the second round and defensive tackle in the third round. We agreed that they would have to consider Matthew Stafford if available at No. 2, but that tackle would be the safer and more practical choice.

I'll share some thoughts from Steve, jotted down during the course of our conversation:

  • "If Jason Smith goes No. 1 to the Lions, the question becomes, can Eugene Monroe be that left tackle? I think Eugene Monroe and Jason Smith are way ahead of the Andre Smith and Michael Oher. I watched Andre Smith in the Florida and Kentucky games last year and I think he is a right tackle. I do not like him in the top 10 and I know a lot of people disagree, but that is how I see it.
  • "As far as Jason Smith going No. 1 and Eugene Monroe going No. 2, yeah, Monroe is that good of a prospect. He could go fourth to Seattle or sixth to Cincinnati.
  • "If you are the Rams, you go Jason Smith and then Eugene Monroe at No. 2, depending on who is available, and then you get the receiver in the second round, where the value will be better. They could go defensive tackle, too.
  • "If you don't believe Alex Barron can start at left tackle, then you have to take a tackle. With Bulger being banged up and with that big contract, you need someone to protect him. Aaron Curry does not make sense for them as much for that reason. When you have a quarterback making that kind of money and he is over 30 and has some injuries, the tackle probably becomes your guy.
  • "There are temptations to take Curry, a great value, and Stafford if he slips because he could be a great NFL quarterback. You can't strictly go on value. You have to take need into account. I would take a franchise tackle over a franchise quarterback nine out of 10 times. Just watching Jake Long last year, you see how much better he made the Dolphins."
  • "Devaney has put a premium on tackles. His teams took five of them 39th to 83rd. Even though we haven't seen him do it early, he hasn't had very many opportunities to do so [because the Chargers traded away first-round choices]."

The names we considered for the Rams at No. 2 included no surprises. That wasn't always the case when we discussed other NFC West teams' general managers and the options they face in the first round and beyond. I'll dive into some of those over the weekend.

Draft Round Pick Devaney's Team Tackle College Conference
2003 1 26
49ers Kwame Harris Stanford
Pac-10
2007
2 39 Falcons Justin Blalock
Texas Big 12
1991
2 47 Chargers Eric Moten
Michigan St.
Big Ten
1994
2 63 Chargers
Vaughn Parker
UCLA Pac-10
2008
3 65 Rams John Greco
Toledo MAC
2000
3 83 Chargers Damion McIntosh
Kansas St.
Big 12
2006
5 139 Falcons Quinn Ojinnaka
Syracuse Big East
1992
5 140 Chargers Eric Jonassen
Bloomsburg [Division II]
1991
6 150 Chargers Jimmy Laister
Oregon T
ech
[NAIA]
1995
6 200 Chargers
Tony Berti
Colorado
Big 12

Posted by ESPN.com's Mike Sando

The Rams need an offensive tackle and presumably will draft one this year. Their general manager, Billy Devaney, broke into the NFL with the Chargers in 1990. He spent a decade with San Diego and has subsequently worked for the 49ers, Falcons and Rams.

The chart shows offensive tackles Devaney's teams have drafted since 1990. Devaney didn't necessarily agree with every selection, of course, but the list should at least provide perspective for future decisions while, possibly, helping us anticipate future choices. Please share if you see patterns that might apply to the 2009 draft.

I started by looking at each of the 30 offensive linemen Devaney's teams have drafted. I then filtered out guards and centers. Linemen such as Leo Goeas played more than one position. I left them off the list if they were primarily guards or centers. John Greco, drafted last year, made the list because he was a tackle and he hasn't played long enough at guard to establish himself at that position.

Devaney's draft history is unusual because his former Chargers boss, Bobby Beathard, frequently traded away first-round choices. That helps explain why Devaney's teams have never drafted a tackle among the top-25 choices.

NFC West GM analysis: Two-round overview

February, 18, 2009
2/18/09
11:35
AM ET

Posted by ESPN.com's Mike Sando

The premise: NFC West general managers Billy Devaney (Rams), Tim Ruskell (Seahawks), Scot McCloughan (49ers) and Rod Graves (Cardinals) have been evaluating NFL talent in some capacity since at least 1994, except for a two-year period when Devaney worked for CBS. Studying their teams' draft selections over the last 15 years can provide perspective for the decisions they'll make in the 2009 draft.

With that in mind, we break down the first- and second-round track records.

(Read full post)

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