NFC West: Ty Warren

This is the third in a series of items revisiting relatively recent NFL trades involving first-round draft choices in the slots NFC West teams occupy this year.

The St. Louis Rams must hope the 14th overall choice treats them better than the 13th and 15th choices treated them recently.

Defensive tackle Adam Carriker was the choice at No. 13 in 2007. Cornerback Tye Hill was the choice at No. 15 a year earlier. Neither lasted long with the team.

This year, Rams fans will be looking to see if one of the top receivers or defensive linemen falls their way at No. 14. As for trading the pick? I'll break out what the 14th overall choice has brought in some previous trades involving only draft choices.

The pick: 14th overall

Held by: St. Louis Rams

Most recent trade involving only picks: 2007. The New York Jets jumped 11 spots to draft cornerback Darrelle Revis at No. 14. This trade helps show what Seattle might have to pay for swapping first-round choices with the Rams this year. In 2007, the Jets sent the 25th, 59th and 164th choices to Carolina for the 14th and 191st picks. The trade-value chart says the Jets paid 1,056.8 points for picks worth 1,116 points. The difference equates to a pick late in the fourth round. Carolina wound up with linebacker Jon Beason (25th), offensive lineman Ryan Kalil (59th) and linebacker Tim Shaw (164th).

Shockey vs. Haynesworth: In 2002, the New York Giants moved up one spot to No. 14 and drafted tight end Jeremy Shockey. They gave up the 15th pick, which Tennessee used for Albert Haynesworth, and the 110th choice (Mike Echols). Echols never played.

When the Bucs got Buffaloed: Tampa Bay moved up seven spots to No. 14 in 2001 for a chance to draft tackle Kenyatta Walker. The Buffalo Bills came away with the 21st pick, used for cornerback Nate Clements, and the 51st choice (Paul Toviessi). Walker was supposed to lock down the left side of the Bucs' line, but he played mostly right tackle, starting 73 games over six seasons. He was in the CFL by age 29.

The price of moving up: What might the Rams pay if they sought to move up a pick or three from the 14th overall spot? In 1993, the Denver Broncos sent the 14th (Steve Everitt) and 83rd (Mike Caldwell) choices to Cleveland for the 11th overall choice (Dan Williams). A decade later, the Patriots sent the 14th (Michael Haynes) and 193rd (Marques Ogden) choices to Chicago for the 13th choice (Ty Warren). Neither trade was a lopsided mismatch on the value chart. The Patriots underpaid slightly. The Broncos overpaid slightly.

Mapping out the draft's top five

April, 8, 2010
4/08/10
4:43
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Let's say the top of the NFL draft goes pretty much as expected.

The Rams take Sam Bradford first. The Lions and Bucs go with defensive tackles. The Redskins take an offensive tackle.

That leaves Kansas City as a pivotal wild card at No. 5, one pick before Seattle.

If the Chiefs take a tackle and Seattle also wants one, the Seahawks would have to weigh whether to use the sixth overall choice on what could be their third-rated tackle. Under this scenario, the Seahawks would have better options if Kansas City drafted for defense.

What might the Chiefs do?

Their general manager, Scott Pioli, has a close association with Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz, leading to speculation that the Chiefs could draft Hawkeyes tackle Bryan Bulaga. Perhaps not. A chat question from Taylor in Salt Lake City offered an opportunity to address Pioli's draft history -- more specifically, the draft histories of his teams. My answer:
I think KC goes defense. I was looking at the picks Scott Pioli's teams have made since he entered the NFL and noticed this: His teams have taken nine players in the top 13 overall picks and seven were defensive players, including five from the SEC. Four were defensive linemen and three of those were from the SEC. I think they go with Eric Berry if available. Then Seattle could probably get the second tackle. I'm thinking it would be Williams or Okung. It's a guessing game with the tackles that early, to an extent.

Pioli's teams have drafted seven players among the top 13 since 2000. All seven played defense: Tyson Jackson, Richard Seymour, Jerod Mayo, Shaun Ellis, John Abraham and Ty Warren. That gives us a pretty good feel for how things might play out (even if the Chiefs do not take Berry, a safety).

Inactive list features star power

December, 7, 2008
12/07/08
2:46
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Posted by ESPN.com's Mike Sando

SEATTLE -- Seattle's Matt Hasselbeck and Walter Jones join the Patriots' Ty Warren on the list of players named inactive for the Patriots-Seahawks game.

Seattle inactives: Hasselbeck, Jones, kicker Brandon Coutu, safety C.J. Wallace, linebacker Leroy Hill, tackle Na'Shan Goddard, defensive tackle Red Bryant and defensive end Brandon Miller.

New England inactives: Warren, receiver Kelley Washington, linebacker Vince Redd, linebacker Pierre Woods, tackle Wesley Britt, guard Billy Yates, tight end David Thomas. Matt Gutierrez is the third quarterback.

Hasselbeck is suiting up as the third quarterback behind Seneca Wallace and Charlie Frye. If Hasselbeck plays, Wallace and Frye cannot return to the game.

With Jones out, Seattle's offensive line looks like this, left to right: Sean Locklear, Floyd Womack, Steve Vallos, Mansfield Wrotto and Ray Willis. The projected starters this season, left to right: Jones, Mike Wahle, Chris Spencer, Rob Sims and Locklear. Mansfield is making his first NFL start. Veteran center Steve McKinney, signed during the week, is active.

Injuries don't have to ruin a season

December, 6, 2008
12/06/08
7:30
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Posted by ESPN.com's Mike Sando

Trick question: Name the NFL team in Seattle suffering the most significant injuries this season. The Seahawks? Perhaps not.

The Patriots, in town for a Week 14 matchup at Qwest Field, have 12 players on injured reserve, including three with Pro Bowl credentials. Seattle also has a dozen players on IR, including two with Pro Bowl experience (Patrick Kerney and Mike Wahle).

The Patriots lost MVP quarterback Tom Brady less than 8 minutes into the regular-season opener. Safety Rodney Harrison lasted six games. Starting running back Laurence Maroney made three starts before New England lost him for the season. Pro Bowl linebacker Adalius Thomas went on IR more recently. Starting guard Stephen Neal missed seven starts. Defensive end Ty Warren hasn't played much recently. Tank Williams, signed in free agency to play a hybrid linebacker-safety role, suffered a season-ending injury in August.

At 7-5, the Patriots are five games worse than their 12-0 record from last season. At 2-10, the Seahawks are six games worse than their 8-4 record from last season.

Which team has done a better job fighting through injuries? I'd say it's the Patriots. They've proven quite adaptable and almost defiant in refusing to let injuries drag them down.

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