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Patriots break bread with Tebow

3/30/2010

Perhaps the perfect spot for University of Florida quarterback Tim Tebow is with the New England Patriots.

They don't have any glaring holes that can be immediately addressed with their 22nd overall draft choice. They have a secure veteran in Tom Brady. They could use another quarterback because they have only two on their roster. Head coach Bill Belichick isn't afraid to take a chance on raw talent. The Patriots also have three second-round picks they could use to trade up to get Tebow if he is on the board a little later.

The Patriots continued their due diligence on Tebow with a visit Monday night and Tuesday, according to ESPN's Adam Schefter. Tebow met with the Buffalo Bills on Monday, and Schefter reports visits have been scheduled next week with the Washington Redskins and Cleveland Browns.

Boston Herald reporter Karen Guregian reports Tebow, who dined with Bills legend Jim Kelly on Sunday night, had dinner Monday night with Belichick at Tresca, former hockey star Ray Bourque's restaurant in the North End.

Belichick is close friends with Gators coach Urban Meyer and probably has more inside info on Tebow than most NFL coaches.

At the NFL owners' meetings last week at the Ritz-Carlton Orlando Grande Lakes, where Belichick was spotted wearing a Gators visor and sweatshirt, he didn't sound deterred by Tebow's much-criticized throwing motion, a problem many evaluators point to when projecting him as a pro quarterback.

"Tiger Woods has rebuilt his golf swing twice," Belichick said. "Every quarterback I've ever had or coached has worked on his mechanics and improved them. Phil Simms, certainly [Jeff] Hostetler, Brady ... I can't think of too many that haven't.

"It's part of every player's development. I mean, show me a player who comes into this league at 21 and is a finished product at any position. Show me one guy. They all need work. They all have things they need to work on. Some guys are more coachable than others. Some guys have different things they need to correct, whatever the technique or physical development happens to be. I don't think that's unusual."