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Sunday, December 23, 2012
Titans' Adams knows fans are unhappy

By Paul Kuharsky

Bud Adams has left early from bad home games.

Watching Sunday’s debacle in Green Bay from Houston, he turned off his TV before it was over.

A week from tomorrow this question will grow a lot louder: Is Mike Munchak going to survive his second season?

Jim Wyatt of The Tennessean asked Adams that late Sunday afternoon.

“I like Mike, I really do. But liking him and getting the job done are two different things,” Adams said. “If he is not getting the job done, that is what I have to find out. Right now, we are not looking very good. Something is wrong and I want to find out what the problem is and what needs to be done to fix it.”

Adams will meet with Munchak and other key people in the organization before deciding what to do.

That piece of Wyatt’s story made it sound like Adams will take at least a day or two to hear about where people think the team stands and why before making decisions. The Titans finish the season with a home game against Jacksonville. They might do a bit to change Adams' mood with a strong season finale.

As for unhappy fans, Adams is hearing you.

“I know we need to do something to make things get better. I’m used to winning games. We’ve had some good teams," Adams said. "And people are not happy -- they don’t want to watch games like this. I don’t want to watch games like this. People under my suite at the stadium, they let me know in their voices they don’t like what is going on.

“I’ll be 90 years old on my next birthday on January 3. I am in good health, but it is a chore to fly up to Nashville and when I get up there I don’t like to see them play poorly. The fans are not happy with me. I need to figure out what I need to do to make things work and see if changes need to be made.”

Munchak can make a case that injuries, a tough schedule and a young quarterback surrounded by a young team made for a tough season and things can get better quickly -- particularly if he revamps his staff.

But the idea that a team's growth is slowed by a coaching change loses steam for some given the recent quick rebuilds overseen by Mike Smith in Atlanta, John Harbaugh in Baltimore, Jim Harbaugh in San Francisco and Chuck Pagano and Bruce Arians in Indianapolis.