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A.J. Green rises to NBA stars' call for social action: 'It starts from us'

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NBA stars call for an end to violence (3:31)

Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James open the 2016 ESPYS with a plea to fellow athletes to take a stand in helping stop the violence that has taken place across the nation. (3:31)

MONTGOMERY, Ohio -- Sometime near the start of the NFL's regular season, Cincinnati Bengals receiver A.J. Green and his wife Miranda are expecting their first child, a boy.

If all goes according to plan, Easton Ace Green will be raised the same way his father says his parents raised him.

"It's about respect and the morals and the value of life," A.J. Green said. "And treat people how you want to be treated. That's the biggest thing I was brought up on from my parents."

Green spoke Thursday during his youth football camp in suburban Cincinnati, a day after NBA superstars Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade, LeBron James and Chris Paul made an emotional plea for athletes to help promote social change in the country during Wednesday night's broadcast of the ESPYs.

Their message came on the heels of high-profile shootings in Minnesota, Texas, Florida and Louisiana.

"As a black, African man, it's challenging like they [Paul, James and the others] were saying," Green said. "We have to stop the violence and it starts from us, these adults, in raising our children the way we were raised. That's the biggest thing. It starts from the top, and it's not going to quit until the top takes control, and that's the adults, by handing it down in morals and respect to their kids."

One of the NFL's biggest stars, Green has been a Pro Bowl selection every year he has been in the NFL. The former University of Georgia standout and South Carolina native enters his sixth season with an understanding of the impact he and his comrades from the NBA can have. It's why he hopes he can help Easton and the kids at his camp see the humanity in others.

"As an athlete, our platform is so high," Green said. "A lot of people look up to us. So if they see us doing something positive, it can change the world. Because a lot of these kids look up to us and want to be us when they get older. By doing that, it makes the world a better place if we can touch one kid."