NFL roster cuts: AFC | NFC

NFL Nation: Cordarro Law

Chargers sign OLB Cordarro Law

February, 14, 2014
Feb 14
6:45
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Farhan Lalji of The Sports Network reports that the San Diego Chargers signed pass-rusher Cordarro Law to a futures contract.

The team confirmed the report, via Twitter, but stated no other details are available as of Friday at 6:30 p.m. ET.

A product of the University of Southern Mississippi, Law played in the Canadian Football League the past two seasons, finishing with 14 sacks for the Calgary Stampeders in 2013. Law was signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by Seattle and attended the team’s training camp in 2012.

Law was productive for the Seahawks during preseason play, but was one of Seattle’s final roster cuts at the end of training camp.

At Southern Mississippi, Law totaled 192 tackles, 27.5 sacks and forced 14 fumbles -- including 64 tackles and 9.5 sacks in his final season.

At his pro day workout, Law ran the 40-yard dash in 4.83 seconds, pumped out 23 reps with 225 pounds on the bench and posted a 31-inch vertical leap.

At 6-2 and 262 pounds, Law is a pass rush specialist who can play outside linebacker in a 3-4 defensive front or weak-side defensive end in a 4-3 defensive front.

Seattle Seahawks cut-down analysis

August, 31, 2012
8/31/12
11:13
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Click here for the complete list of Seattle Seahawks' roster moves.

Most significant move. The Seattle Seahawks emerged from last season with high hopes for Josh Portis as a developmental quarterback. The arrival of Matt Flynn in free agency and new starter Russell Wilson through the draft left Portis on the outside. The Seahawks released him, leaving Wilson and Flynn as the only quarterbacks on the initial 53-man roster.

Some teams with rookie starters brace themselves for what they know will be a long season. The Seahawks think Wilson upgrades the position immediately. They appear unworried by rookie walls and all the other ominous metaphors that typically pop up with inexperienced players behind center. The team could always consider adding a third quarterback in the future, but the value wasn't there given what Seattle thinks about its top two quarterbacks.

Onward and upward: Portis, cornerback Phillip Adams, guard Rishaw Johnson, linebacker Korey Toomer and defensive tackle Pep Levingston (injury settlement) have all shown positive signs. Toomer in particular appears to have practice-squad potential, at least.

The cut list also included Pierre Allen, Cordarro Law, Allen Bradford, Paul Fanaika, Jermaine Kearse, Kyle Knox, Sean McGrath, DeShawn Shead, Lavasier Tuinei, Cooper Helfet (injured) and Vai Taua (injured).

Receivers Deon Butler and Kris Durham lost out as former mid-round draft choices. They remain young and could carry appeal, as could speed receiver Ricardo Lockette. But with veteran Braylon Edwards playing well enough to earn a roster spot comfortably, there were fewer spots for less-proven prospects at the position.

Note that the unspectacular but steady Ben Obomanu stuck on the roster, at least for now. Seattle hasn't fared as well upgrading depth at receiver as it has at other positions. Obomanu's continued annual presence as a 2006 seventh-round choice reflects that, in my view.

What's next: The Seahawks could use depth at linebacker, one reason I was a little surprised to see the team release Toomer, a rookie fifth-round choice with speed. Another linebacker, Matt McCoy, landed on injured reserve.

Seattle also could consider pursuing a slot receiver as insurance against lingering injury concerns for Doug Baldwin.

It's looking like running back Marshawn Lynch will avoid, for now, a suspension stemming from his DUI arrest earlier this offseason. That was a potential concern, mitigated some by rookie Robert Turbin's emergence.

While cornerback Walter Thurmond went on the reserve/physically-unable-to-perform (PUP) list, offensive lineman James Carpenter did not. With Carpenter available early in the year, the Seahawks appear relatively set on their offensive line. Rookie J.R. Sweezy's emergence as the potential starting right guard was another factor there, even with guard Allen Barbre going on the reserve/suspended list.
Looking back on three things discussed here before the Seattle Seahawks' preseason game Friday night at Kansas City (they led 44-7 in the fourth quarter when I filed this):

1. Russell Wilson's efficiency. The rookie quarterback led Seattle to three field goals and three touchdowns on his first six possessions. Wilson played another series with the backups. That one included a 40-yard strike to Terrell Owens before the drive ended with a missed 51-yard field goal. Wilson completed 13 of 19 passes for 185 yards and two touchdowns. He ran twice for 58 yards, including once for a 31-yard gain on third-and-7.

This had to be enough for Wilson to emerge as the favorite to start on a night when Matt Flynn sat out to rest a sore throwing elbow. If not, what more did Wilson need to do? Update: After the game, coach Pete Carroll indicated he would not name a starting quarterback at this time.

Wilson got receiver Sidney Rice involved early. He ran the two-minute offense effectively before halftime. Wilson connected on downfield throws with Owens, Braylon Edwards, Kellen Winslow, Anthony McCoy and Golden Tate. Winslow and Charly Martin caught scoring passes. Wilson completed passes covering 40, 32, 25 and 21 yards.

Wilson did miss McCoy over the middle on a second-and-15 play, but otherwise, he was mostly on the mark. Seattle had to like what it saw from Wilson and two other rookies, right guard J.R. Sweezy and running back Robert Turbin. Sweezy's aggressive run blocking stood out. Turbin ran with power and also showed surprising speed in pulling away from Kansas City linebackers to break a 25-yard scoring run. Turbin carried 14 times for 93 yards.

With Flynn out, Tarvaris Jackson made his 2012 exhibition debut, taking over late in the third quarter.

2. WRs revisited. Edwards looked good again. Owens struggled until making an improbable overhead catch while putting on the brakes along the sideline. Owens resembled a man slipping on a banana peel. The play required skill and concentration. Teammates cheered loudly along the sideline after the catch.

Earlier, Owens could not make a catch when defended well along the right sideline. He missed another chance on a third-down pass thrown slightly behind him, but a penalty for roughing the passer kept the drive going for Seattle.

Golden Tate held onto a contested ball for a 14-yard gain, and his 92-yard punt return for a touchdown was most impressive.

3. Pass-rushers. Rookie Greg Scruggs collected a sack early. Seattle held Matt Cassel to 4.9 yards per pass attempt, pressuring him occasionally without collecting sacks.

The Chiefs converted five times on third down during a 17-play, 80-yard touchdown drive against Seattle's starting defense. Mike Morgan and Cordarro Law did collect sacks for Seattle later in the game.

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