NFL Nation: David Greene

Draft rewind: Seahawks' five-year recap

February, 20, 2013
2/20/13
12:00
PM ET
A look at the NFC West's best and worst from the past five NFL drafts, one team at a time.

Seattle Seahawks

Best choice: Russell Wilson, QB, 2012 third round. Wilson went from springtime curiosity to surprise opening-day starter to Pro Bowl quarterback in eight months. Seattle has hit big on some other draft choices during the Pete Carroll-John Schneider era, but Wilson stands apart from the rest. No rookie in the 36-year history of the organization has impacted the team as dramatically as Wilson did in 2012. That is a bold statement, but one that required about 30 seconds of verification. Wilson is the first QB draft choice in Seahawks history to succeed with the team. None of the other 15 came close (Mike Teel, David Greene, Seneca Wallace, Jeff Kelly, Josh Booty, Brock Huard, Rick Mirer, Dan McGwire, John Gromos, Sammy Garza, David Norrie, John Conner, Sam Adkins, Steve Myer and Chris Rowland). The 26 touchdown passes Wilson threw during the regular season exceed the Seattle career totals for every one of those other 15 drafted QBs except Mirer, who had 41 touchdowns over four seasons with the team.

Worst choice: Aaron Curry, LB, 2009 first round. The Seahawks thought they were making the surest choice of the 2009 draft when they made Curry the fourth overall choice. Instead, a franchise that had used top-10 picks for defensive stars Cortez Kennedy and Kenny Easley got an all-time bust. Curry had 5.5 sacks, 12 passes defensed and four forced fumbles while starting 28 of 30 games for the Seahawks over two seasons. Something wasn't right, however, and by Curry's third season, the team had seen enough. Seattle essentially bought out Curry's expensive rookie contract to facilitate a trade to Oakland. Lawrence Jackson was a distant second for this distinction.

Verdict pending: James Carpenter, OL, 2011 first round. Wilson's selection in 2012 offsets lingering regrets from the Seahawks' decision to draft Carpenter over Andy Dalton a year earlier. Still, Seattle cannot feel good about how Carpenter's career has unfolded. Carpenter was struggling in pass protection at right tackle before a severe knee injury convinced Seattle that Carpenter's future would be at left guard, next to tackle Russell Okung. The conversion did not go well last season because the knee injury continued to limit Carpenter's mobility. The coming season appears pivotal for Carpenter.

Related: 2011 draft rewind.

The book on Charlie Whitehurst

March, 9, 2010
3/09/10
11:43
AM ET
Charlie Whitehurst shares something in common with any quarterback the Cardinals might draft this year.

He has never attempted a pass in a regular-season NFL game.

Whitehurst
The Chargers' backup quarterback, on the Cardinals' radar as a restricted free agent, was tendered to a third-round choice. The Cardinals have an extra third-rounder from the Anquan Boldin trade, but the team could conceivably attempt to work out alternative compensation with San Diego should Arizona decide to pursue Whitehurst.

NFLDraftScout.com's analysis on Whitehurst coming out of Clemson in 2006 called him a "good competitor who is a quiet leader, but has total control of the huddle" and a quarterback with "a snappy overhead delivery and a fluid follow-through rather than a windmill type that most tall passers display."

Some of the negatives listed could be outdated, the assumption being Whitehurst has worked to correct them under Norv Turner and the Chargers' offensive staff.

Matt Leinart is the only quarterback on the Cardinals' roster.

Using a third-round choice for Whitehurst, 27, could make more sense than using one for a college prospect. Though inexperienced, Whitehurst would be better prepared to play in a regular-season game.

The chart shows third-round quarterbacks drafted since 2000. Not many have succeeded. One exception: The Texans acquired 2004 third-round choice Matt Schaub from the Falcons when Schaub had minimal experience.

Posted by ESPN.com's Mike Sando

John Crumpacker of the San Francisco Chronicle outlines issues facing the 49ers with nearly six months left until the regular season. The quarterback situation is one of them, again.

Matt Maiocco of the Santa Rosa Press-Democrat takes a quick look at the 49ers' first offseason practices. 

Also from Maiocco: He profiles new 49ers offensive coordinator Jimmy Raye. Maiocco: "During his Michigan State career, from 1965 to '67, Raye was the only black quarterback starting at the NCAA Division I level. He played a central role [in] one of the most memorable games in college history. Michigan State and Notre Dame entered their late-season 1966 game with unbeaten records. Notre Dame was ranked No. 1, while Michigan State was No. 2. The game ended in controversy as Notre Dame coach Ara Paraseghian elected to run out the clock and settle for a 10-10 tie rather than go for the win in the closing minutes. The teams shared the national championship."

Dan Brown of the San Jose Mercury News profiles the 49ers' quarterbacks. Brown: "Assuming he has recovered from his second shoulder surgery, [Alex] Smith still possesses the best raw tools among 49ers passers. His confidence was shaken by an ill-fated pairing with coach Mike Nolan, but Smith is young enough to rebound."

Matt Barrows of the Sacramento Bee previews the 49ers' practices. Free safety Mark Roman plans to pursue a potential trade until June. At that point, he would report to the 49ers.

Bill Coats of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch says Rams general manager Billy Devaney was impressed by Eugene Monroe's pro day. The team is also working toward agreements with Billy Bajema and Gus Frerotte.

VanRam of Turf Show Times runs through some Rams-related notes. VanRam: "The Rams have requested a private workout with Penn State WR Derrick Williams. Williams is likely a second round pick, and an intriguing player for the new offense. According to this scouting report from Mocking the Draft, Williams has great after-the-catch ability and intelligence, two features which could be real assets in a system that gives the WRs a little range."

Jason Cole of Yahoo! Sports checks in with former Rams and 49ers offensive coordinator Mike Martz for a look at the 2006 quarterback draft class. Martz on Matt Leinart: "There is a maturation process you have to go through as a quarterback. He's lucky that he's on a good team where he hasn't had to play a lot yet and he's had Kurt to watch and learn from. That can be really valuable for a quarterback. Eventually, he'll have to go in there and get beat up a little and succeed under duress."

Darren Urban of azcardinals.com says Anthony Becht is the latest tight end to compete for a job in Arizona. Urban: "Becht, 6-foot-5 and 280 pounds, had just six catches last season but played in all 16 games for the eighth season in a row. His teams have had seven 1,000-yard rushers in his nine NFL seasons and Becht has 178 career receptions for 1,450 yards."

Doug Farrar of Field Gulls, in linking to a photo of Seahawks general mananger Tim Ruskell at Matthew Stafford's pro day, hopes the team finds someone better than David Greene. Ouch.

John Morgan of Field Gulls sizes up Ruskell's draft priorities. He notes that Ruskell, while with Seattle, has drafted only one player, a long-snapper, from a non-BCS school.

Michael Steffes of Seahawk Addicts links to Bucky Brooks' SI.com story suggesting the Seahawks are poised for a big turnaround in 2009. He thinks new offensive coordinator Greg Knapp has the right pieces for his offense. Brooks: "With [Julius] Jones and T.J. Duckett in the fold, Knapp inherits a pair of runners who should thrive in this scheme. Jones, who had two 100-yard games last season, is a decisive runner who is most effective running between the tackles. Though his season was viewed as a disappointment, the six-year pro averaged a respectable 4.4 yards per carry and didn't receive nearly enough touches [he only averaged 10.5 rushing attempts a game in 2008] to determine if he could cut it as a feature back."

Also from Steffes hopes this is the draft Seattle uses to revamp its offense. Steffes: "They found a great young tight end last year, but just about every other position could use some youth."

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