NFL Nation: Kyle Brady

Top draft busts in AFC East history tallied

February, 28, 2011
2/28/11
4:11
PM ET
When word got out the New York Jets would release defensive end Vernon Gholston, I solicited your nominees for the AFC East's biggest draft busts.

These disappointments received the most votes for each club:

Buffalo Bills
  1. Defensive end Aaron Maybin (11th in 2009)
  2. Tackle Mike Williams (fourth in 2002)
  3. Quarterback J.P. Losman (22nd in 2004)
  4. Defensive tackle John McCargo (26th in 2006)
  5. Defensive end Erik Flowers (26th in 2000)
Comment: Sadly, Buffalo's list suggests readers don't remember the team before the Music City Miracle. Last year's strong safety, Donte Whitner, finished sixth. Epic busts Walt Patulski (first in 1972), Tony Hunter (12th in 1983) and Perry Tuttle (19th in 1982) received only one vote each. Nobody mentioned running back Terry Miller (fifth in 1978).

Miami Dolphins
  1. Receiver Yatil Green (15th in 1997)
  2. Receiver Ted Ginn (ninth in 2007)
  3. Running back John Avery (29th in 1998)
  4. Cornerback Jamar Fletcher (26th in 2001)
  5. Receiver Randal Hill (23rd in 1991), Eric Kumerow (16th in 1988), running back Sammie Smith (ninth in 1989)
Comment: The Dolphins were the most nominated team in this exercise. They led with 16 nominees and the number of votes cast. Green didn't play in his rookie or sophomore seasons because of injuries and lasted eight games his third year. My pick would have been Kumerow, whose career consisted of three seasons, zero starts and five sacks.

New England Patriots
  • Running back Laurence Maroney (21st in 2006)
  • Receiver Chad Jackson (36th in 2006)
  • Receiver Hart Lee Dykes (16th in 1989)
  • Cornerback Chris Canty (29th in 1997)
  • Offensive lineman Eugene Chung (13th in 1992), defensive end Kenneth Sims (first in 1982), linebacker Chris Singleton (eighth in 1990)
Comment: I was surprised Sims didn't receive more attention. He was the No. 1 choice ahead of Marcus Allen, Gerald Riggs, Mike Munchak, Jim McMahon and Chip Banks. Maroney received the most votes, but he also generated the most spirited debate because many readers disagreed he should be considered a bust. Jackson was a second-round pick, but the Patriots traded up 16 spots to get him.

New York Jets
  1. Running back Blair Thomas (second in 1990)
  2. Defensive end Vernon Gholston (sixth in 2008)
  3. Tight end Kyle Brady (ninth in 1995)
  4. Defensive tackle DeWayne Robertson (fourth in 2003)
  5. Receiver Johnny "Lam" Jones (second in 1980)
Comment: There was a lot of material to work with here. I was satisfied readers emphasized the magnitude of the bust over the freshness of Gholston's release by voting for Thomas. The next running back off the board in 1990 was Emmitt Smith.

Some fun draft facts

April, 20, 2010
4/20/10
3:02
PM ET
This is the time of year when the fine folks in the NFL’s public relations department really earn their pay.

Thanks to them, my wake-up call this morning came from a FedEx driver, who delivered a package with bios on just about every draft prospect you can imagine. They’re also sending out a steady stream of draft-related e-mails. Some of them are very lengthy, but you can find some really interesting stuff if you take the time to sort through them.

One of my favorites is the little “fun facts’’ section that came in an e-mail just a bit ago. I don’t have space to share them all with you, so I picked out five that I thought were pretty interesting:

  • Tennessee safety Eric Berry studied dentistry at Tennessee and interned at a Georgia dentist office this past summer.
  • South Florida wide receiver Carlton Mitchell’s mother, Angela, is the “cut man’’ for professional boxer Antonio Tarver.
  • Oklahoma’s Sam Bradford, Gerald McCoy and Trent Williams will be in New York for the draft. It will be the first time three players from the same school have been present since Penn State’s Ki-Jana Carter, Kerry Collins and Kyle Brady were there in 1995.
  • Speaking of Oklahoma, the Sooners have had a great program, but they’re not known for producing quarterbacks. Although Bradford is likely to change things, you want to take a guess who’s the last Oklahoma quarterback to throw an NFL pass? Jack Jacobs for the Green Bay Packers back in 1949. Before you start filling up the mailbag saying that’s not correct, Troy Aikman doesn’t count. Yes, he spent two years at Oklahoma, but he transferred to UCLA and that’s where he earned his way to the NFL.
  • Penn State defensive tackle Jared Odrick has invited his college defensive line coach Larry Johnson Sr. to wait with him in the “green room’’ during the draft. Johnson also is the father of NFL running back Larry Johnson Jr.

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