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No home cooking for Oregon

One of the oft-cited flaws with college football polls is regional bias -- "being a homer" as we call it in the business. It's the not unreasonable idea that a college football writer is more likely to vote the teams in his region that he covers higher. And, perhaps, to downgrade teams outside of his region in service to the interests of his regional teams.

Suffice it to say, Oregon does not benefit from that in the AP poll, as you can see here.

Eight voters don't rank the Ducks either No. 1 or No. 2. Of that eight, five are from the West.

In contrast, seven voters have Auburn ranked fourth on their ballots -- the No. 2 Tigers' lowest ranking. None are from the Southeast. Only one is from the West Coast.

Keep in mind before getting angry or getting all conspiracy theory that the AP poll doesn't count in the BCS standings, though it does award its own national championship trophy.

Moreover, there's plenty of evidence of voters who aren't regionally biased. Three of the 11 voters who have the Tigers third are from SEC states. And only five of the 12 voters who have Auburn No. 1 are from SEC states.

Further, consider the four unbeaten teams. Is there really a true pecking order? Is there a clear argument for any of the four not being worthy of at least a No. 2 ranking?

I don't think so. But feel free to disagree.