Q&A: Stanford's Jordan Richards

April, 30, 2014
Apr 30
7:00
PM ET
Stanford safety Jordan Richards took a few minutes to chat with the Pac-12 blog about how spring ball went for the two-time defending Pac-12 champs and adjusting to life with some new defensive coaches.

Every year it seems like people say "this is the year Stanford takes a step back," and every year you prove people wrong. How will you prove them wrong this year?

[+] EnlargeJordan Richards
Ezra Shaw/Getty ImagesJordan Richards had three interceptions last season, including two against UCLA.
Jordan Richards: What happens in the season is a product of what we do in the offseason. Whether that’s on the field in spring ball or on the field by ourselves or the stuff we do with Coach [Shannon] Turley in strength and conditioning. It’s a mentality that’s throughout our program. We have a standard. The bar is raised every year, and we’re constantly trying to beat that standard. The last couple of years has been a product of the work the previous classes have gotten everyone to buy into.

How much of a hangover was there following the Rose Bowl?

JR: I would not say there was much. There’s not much to be happy about after you lose a Rose Bowl. So we got our two weeks off. Got rejuvenated. Got to reboot. Got to go home. And then it was right back to the grind.

The secondary faces a lot of pressure because traditionally it has been so tough to run on Stanford. As a result, the secondary stats are a little skewed. How do you guys handle that knowing teams are going to be coming after you through the air a lot of the time because the front seven has been so tough?

JR: It’s nice playing behind those front seven guys and how they get after the passer because it makes our job easier. We can cover while they get after the quarterback. We definitely appreciate all of that. In terms of the numbers, it doesn’t really matter. It’s cool to have bragging rights. But in the end, all that really matters is Pac-12 trophies and bowl trophies. The one we want is a national championship trophy and that’s what we’re working for. We play in a pass-happy conference anyway. Wazzu is going to put it up 80-90 times. You just have to live with it and hope each and every Saturday you come out with a "W" when it’s all said and done.

There have been some changes on the defensive coaching staff. What has that adjustment been like this spring?

JR: We were sad to see coach [Derek] Mason leave. But we’re happy to see him as a head coach. Coach [Duane] Akina came in for the second half of spring ball. For an older guy like me, you’ve heard one voice for the last three years. So it’s different with a new voice out there. That’s something we’re all getting used to. Coach Akina has this group moving in the right direction. Some guys who probably didn’t have as big a role in the past couple of years have gotten a clean slate with a new coach and that’s good for us. Everyone has something to prove, including myself, to Coach Akina. We’re trying to put our best football forward. The spring was good. We just need to translate that into the spring and hopefully when we get into camp we’ll be ready to go.

What has it been like without Ed Reynolds? You two were such a good tandem the last couple of years. Is it strange not having him out there next to you?

JR: I guess it’s weird to know I’m one of the older guys now. Between myself and Kyle Olugbode and [John] Flacco. I guess that’s the biggest change. You see guys you played with for two or three years and they start disappearing. You start with Michael Thomas and Delano Howell and those guys graduated. Then Terrence Brown and Harold Bernard and those guys graduate. I guess it’s a realization that this is the last one I have eligibility-wise. Whoever is playing among the DB group, I feel like we really improved. Who plays? I don’t know. I’m fighting for time just like everybody else. It’s been good. We’re all grinding and fighting in the same direction.

Speaking of guys leaving, you’re losing a lot of guys who were the “faces” of the defense in Shayne Skov, Trent Murphy and Ben Gardner. Do you feel like this is starting to become your defense?

JR: Maybe not in the traditional “face” of the defense. But in terms of leadership, confidence, poise on the field, I feel like that’s a responsibility of mine more than it’s been the last couple of years. There are plenty of guys besides me who have played a lot of football here who are poised, calm and respected players on this defense. The faces change. We don’t have the Screaming Mohawk with Shayne or Big Murph out there. But we’ve got guys that can still demand what those guys demanded of this defense.

After the NFL, what do you want to do with your public policy degree?

JR: I’m still not sure. Taking classes to figure that out. I want to try my hand at education. Whether that’s policy, I don’t know. I feel like I need some experience in the classroom before I focus on policy. Hopefully I’ll find out more this summer.

Finish this sentence: In 2014, Stanford football will be …

JR: Exciting. I’m excited to play next year and I’m excited what this team has in store for our school and the Pac-12. I’m excited. That’s the word I would use.

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