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Tuesday, January 28, 2014
Mailbag: What's next for Oregon State?

By Kevin Gemmell

Welcome to the mailbag. This is a safe place that allows the free expression of ideas. Let your power animal run wild, just please clean up after it.

Couple of questions about the departure of Oregon State offensive coordinator Danny Langsdorf (Eric and Benny, questions received) mainly inquiring as to the direction of the offense, what it means for Sean Mannion and how this impacts the team this close to recruiting.

Sean Mannion
Will Oregon State QB Sean Mannion miss coach Danny Langsdorf, who is heading to the NFL? Sure, but it shouldn't affect his production.
Kevin Gemmell: First, I’m not sure what this does for Mannion. I’m hoping to get him on the phone sometime in the next couple of days to chat about it. We’re working on that. I do know that Mannion specifically cited Langsdorf as a reason for him coming back another year. He wasn’t the only reason, but he was important enough for the QB to make note of it.

As for what it means for the direction of the offense. Not too much, I don’t think. Mike Riley has basically been the offensive coordinator the last couple of seasons anyway, calling all of the plays. And you can’t argue with OSU’s offensive production the last couple of seasons. It’s the defense that cost it some games in 2013. You could probably make a case that Brandin Cooks leaving might have the bigger impact than Langsdorf. After all, Biletnikoff winners don’t come around all that often.

Possible replacements? The trend -- at least among the league’s departed defensive coordinators -- has been to keep it in-house. And if that’s the case, maybe wide receivers coach Brent Brennan gets a long look. In three years in Corvallis he’s helped develop, among others, Cooks, Markus Wheaton and James Rodgers. Offensive line coach Mike Cavanaugh is another interesting name. He’s been around nine years and is extremely well respected. Just floating that one for kicks. I have no idea if he’s interested.

As for recruiting, I talked to someone in the know at Oregon State who said Riley isn’t too concerned about it right now. Is it possible that they lose a commit over this? Maybe. But no doubt Riley has already reached out or made visits to all of Langsdorf’s targets and assured them that the buck stops with him offensively.

So the takeaway is this -- Langsdorf was a very good position coach. That’s why he’s been offered a position to keep doing it at the next level. But it’s hard not imagine Riley isn’t still going to be the primary play-caller, regardless of who gets the OC gig. And with Mannion back for another season, the Beavers should be pretty potent again if they can find some receivers (paging Victor Bolden?) and get the running game going.

Michael in Phoenix writes: It has been thoroughly discussed how ASU is losing 9-starters on defense. While this is disconcerting, ASU also welcomes back most of its explosive offense. Not going to ask you to predict next season’s outcome just yet, but what would you characterize as a successful season in Year 3 under CTG? 8 wins? 9 wins? 10? (It goes without saying a win over He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named down south is mandatory).

Kevin Gemmell: Offense is nice. But as your coach is fond of saying -- defense wins, wait for it … championships. OK, so Todd Graham isn’t the first guy to come up with that one. But I know he believes in it. And I know he makes his living on that side of the football. And when you look at all of the talent they are losing -- combined with a lack of experienced depth -- then the Sun Devils are probably going to have to win some track meets.

And that’s OK. As you pointed out, they are pretty loaded offensively. Losing Marion Grice and his 20 touchdowns is obviously a hit. But Taylor Kelly returns at quarterback and we got glimpses of what D.J. Foster is capable of as the No. 1 back. What we saw in those glimpses was inconsistency. At times, brilliant and electric. Other times, he looked like a young back. Which is expected. There are also some depth issues across the offensive line that will have to be addressed.

But when you look at the potential of the passing attack, it’s pretty scary. Combine Kelly with returning Jaelen Strong and the addition of Eric Lauderdale, that’s going to be a potent air strike. Lauderdale is one of the top JC wide receivers in the country. Graham hit a home run when he brought in Strong, also a JC transfer, last season. He’s done it again with the 6-foot-2, 200-pound Lauderdale, who runs in the 4.4 range. He picked the Sun Devils over Florida, Oregon, Nebraska, Texas Tech and Washington, to name a few.

So yes, I expect the offense to be really good. It’s going to have to be. But given what Graham has accomplished in his first two seasons, I think folks would be disappointed with anything less than eight wins. But a hat trick against the Wildcats will go a long way, even if they don’t repeat as South champs.

Scott in Concord writes: Did you know that when the Pac-12 lunch links post a link to the Seattle Times, it asks the reader for a subscription to view the article? I am pretty sure ESPN has subscriptions to these links, but I think people should haven't to pay for subscriptions for links posted from your site. Thanks.

Kevin Gemmell: Ted touched on this in his mailbag last week. This is the way newspapers are trending. Having spent the bulk of my career coming home with ink on my fingers, I can tell you that it’s an industry that is struggling to find a viable business model for making money on the Web.

Just for kicks, you should watch this. It’s scary interesting.

As for the alternative, it’s tough to find a link for every school each day -- especially in the offseason. The other option is that the school doesn’t get a link for that day. Would you guys prefer that? Let us know. But we try very hard to make sure every school is linked. We’ll obviously continue to look for free options. But if a non-pay option isn’t available, you have free will to do what you want. You can either pay for the information, or not. The market will decide if there is enough demand to pay for content. We’re just putting it out there.

Trevor Reilly, Shayn Reilly
Things are looking up for Trevor Reilly and his daughter, Shayn, who has been battling cancer.
FG in Seattle writes: You made Trevor Reilly from Utah your No. 20 pick on your postseason list of Top 25 conference players. You point out he played through a torn ACL in 2012. Per the Pac 12 channel, he played this entire season with his 11-month-old daughter going through chemotherapy for a renal cancer and was due to be done in December if all went well. Is there some type of public update on this story? If there is, and it's good news, a lot of Pac 12 fans outside of Utah would like to hear it. Thanks.

Kevin Gemmell: The last public report I saw about this was last month following the Utah-Colorado game. And the news appears to be very good.

I’ve known Trevor since he was a sophomore at Valley Center High School and covered him through his prep days into the Mountain West and finally through the Pac-12. That’s one of my favorite parts of the job is seeing these guys as high school players going on to have great college careers and then into the professional ranks. I’m thrilled for him and his family.

Trev on the West Coast writes: Read the article about the ACC stepping up its scheduling for the upcoming year, however I can't help but notice with its eight-game conference schedule, each team only averages 9.35 big boy teams (ACC/BIG12/B1G/PAC12/SEC/ND/BYU). So I checked each conference to see the stats: BIG12 -- 10.1; PAC 12 -- 10; ACC -- 9.35; B1G -- 9.14; SEC -- 8.88. My question is when will the polls actually stop ranking teams for good records against weak OCCs and actually make you beat people before you get ranked? On a side note, if you are curious how big a difference there is between nine and eight conference games, use the NCAA game and swap the PAC and SEC and watch how in 2-3 years the number of ranked teams each year is flopped.

Kevin Gemmell: What you have to understand is that “the polls” aren’t one single, entity. They consist of dozens of voters. And each of those voters has their own value system that they apply to factors like strength of schedule, overall record, good wins vs. good losses, etc.

You can see it when Ted and I do our weekly rankings. He and I differ quite a bit on certain things. I tend to not punish teams as much for losing to good teams on the road. Ted, however, clearly lets his time in the South bias his views to the point where it gets nauseating. I jest, of course.

The polls are a human system. And with human systems come flaws. At least they are perceived as flaws because you don’t agree with the way someone is voting. They think their vote is perfect.

My good friend Jon Wilner is one of the more renegade voters out there. And he and I have had many, many discussions about how he votes. I don’t always agree with him. But I also know he’s not just throwing darts. He takes it very seriously. I’ve seen him after games furiously scribbling out his Top 25 in his notepad, and his voting system works for him.

Regional bias comes into play -- as well as what we see with our own eyes. Trying to make sense of it all can make you go koo-koo bananas.

Cougy the Coug in Spokane, Wash. writes: Great job leaving Deone Bucannon off of your departing players list. He was only an All-American!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Kevin Gemmell: Thank you for your interest in the Pac-12 blog’s reading comprehension seminar and your gratuitous use of exclamation points. I’m afraid this is the advanced course. Ted already covered remedial reading last week. Your submission is appreciated.