What to do at QB behind Nick Foles

March, 24, 2014
Mar 24
3:42
PM ET
Now that Michael Vick is officially a member of the New York Jets, are the Philadelphia Eagles ready to roll with Matt Barkley as their backup quarterback?

[+] EnlargeMatt Barkley
John Geliebter/USA TODAY SportsCan Matt Barkley, who played in just three games his rookie season, be a suitable backup QB for the Eagles in 2014?
Nick Foles is the unquestioned starter after what he did in 2013 -- 27 touchdown passes, two interceptions and a 119.2 passer rating with an 8-2 regular-season record. But has he done enough to where the Eagles treat him the way the New England Patriots have treated Tom Brady and the Denver Broncos and Indianapolis Colts have treated Peyton Manning?

Barkley played in three games last season and had four interceptions, three coming in one quarter of work against the Dallas Cowboys. He was a fourth-round pick last year, and while he might have the potential to develop, Philadelphia would be putting a lot into such an untested quarterback with a team that looks like it is ready to compete with the best in the NFC.

After winning Super Bowl XXXVI, the Patriots kept veteran Damon Huard behind Brady for two more years, although Rohan Davey threw more passes in those seasons. In 2006, the Patriots had Vinny Testaverde around for three games but went with Matt Cassel as the No. 2. Since 2009, the Patriots have had Brian Hoyer and Ryan Mallett as Brady's backups and have not needed them for anything other than mop-up duty.

Does Chip Kelly's system expose the quarterback more? Foles was knocked out of the first Cowboys' game with a concussion.

The Houston Texans just guaranteed Ryan Fitzpatrick $4 million on a two-year deal to most likely be their backup quarterback.

Mark Sanchez was added to the list of available quarterbacks with his release from the Jets. The rest of the crew consists of Josh Freeman, Matt Flynn, Shaun Hill and Colt McCoy.

Maybe it’s better to roll with Barkley.

Todd Archer

ESPN Dallas Cowboys reporter

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