Eagles interested in speedy Mike Evans?

April, 2, 2014
Apr 2
11:00
AM ET
Evans
Following the controversial decision to release wide receiver DeSean Jackson, the Philadelphia Eagles appear to be ready to take the next step.

Several reports have stated the Eagles worked out 6-foot-5, 225-pound wide receiver Mike Evans, who caught 69 passes for 1,394 yards and 12 touchdowns for Texas A&M last season.

The Eagles will pick No. 22 overall in the NFL draft's first round, and it would be mildly surprising if they used that pick on a wide receiver.

Losing Jackson means the Eagles are losing their biggest deep threat. But Evans averaged more than 20 yards per catch -- 20.2, to be exact -- for the Aggies.

Without Jackson's 82 receptions, 1,332 yards and nine touchdowns, Jeremy Maclin and Riley Cooper are Philadelphia's two biggest threats after Jackson. Maclin missed the entire 2013 season with a torn anterior cruciate ligament, while Cooper stepped up to grab 47 passes for 835 yards and eight touchdowns. He also accumulated 17.8 yards per catch while becoming a real factor in the red zone.

Evans is intriguing because of his ability to stretch the field, much like Jackson.

Evans not only broke the old record of 1,207 receiving yards set by Ryan Swope in 2011, he shattered it. It was the top mark in the SEC among receivers with 40 or more receptions. In addition, Evans tied the school single-game record with four receiving touchdowns against Auburn. He had 287 yards receiving against Auburn and 279 against Alabama, proving he could elevate his level of play against the top teams.

Eagles coach Chip Kelly recently attended Texas A&M's pro day, which featured Evans and quarterback Johnny Manziel.

There will be a litany of wide receivers available in the draft, but it sure looks as if Kelly is interested in the speedy Evans among others.

“I don't have much to compare it to, but there are some talented players in this draft,” Kelly told the Philadelphia Daily News. “When you talk to people, they say it is more talented than it's been in the past.”

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