Eagles not locked into any spot at No. 22

May, 1, 2014
May 1
2:00
PM ET
During a pre-draft discussion with reporters Thursday, Philadelphia Eagles general manager Howie Roseman repeatedly said the club would take the best available player during the NFL draft.

They're not locked into any one specific position.

With such a deep draft at wide receiver, and with the Eagles clearly needing one with the recent release of three-time Pro Bowler DeSean Jackson, wouldn't it make sense to start here? Sure.

But Roseman wouldn't be bound by one particular spot.

The Eagles hold the No. 22 overall pick and they could go a variety of ways when the first round begins next Thursday.

"When you look at that first tier group of guys, and there is some variation in that first tier, I think you're probably going to look at 10 guys who will end up being drafted at least in the first two rounds," Roseman said of the group of wide receivers available. "And then there is that next level group of solid starters where I think you can be sitting there in the fourth round and get a guy who is going to be, by our pro definition, a red starter in this league, and usually that's hard to find in the fourth and fifth round."

Coincidentally, three wide receivers have been selected at No. 22 overall since 2005 -- Oklahoma's Mark Clayton to the Baltimore Ravens in '05, Florida's Percy Harvin to the Minnesota Vikings in '09 and Georgia Tech's Demaryius Thomas to the Denver Broncos in '10.

In this draft, there are a plethora of ultra-talented wide receivers who could step in and help the Eagles immediately.

The team could wait as well until the later rounds.

"When you look back at the history of the drafts, the wide receiver position always goes later to begin with," Roseman said. "And now with the influx of the underclassmen at the wide receiver position, I just think that's how it will turn out."

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