Philadelphia Eagles: Colt Anderson

Colt Anderson heading to Colts

April, 22, 2014
Apr 22
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Former Philadelphia Eagles safety and special teams standout Colt Anderson agreed to terms with the Indianapolis Colts on Monday night, according to a report on Philadelphiaeagles.com.

Anderson played nearly four seasons with the Eagles after being signed off the Minnesota Vikings practice squad in 2010. Anderson began with the Eagles in November of 2010 and was even one of the team captains in the playoffs.

A former winner of the Ed Block Courage Award, Anderson returned to action with the Eagles in ’12 after missing much of the ’11 season with a severe knee injury.

Anderson signed with the Vikings as a rookie free agent in ’09.

Anderson was a former star at Montana where he ranked fifth on the school’s all-time list with 313 tackles.
It is probably inevitable, as the Philadelphia Eagles rebound from the disappointing end of the Andy Reid era. The players who won’t be around when Chip Kelly’s program peaks aren’t going to be highly coveted elsewhere in the league.

That is the impression you get when looking through Bill Polian’s Free Agent Tracker Insider on ESPN Insider. The longtime NFL executive, along with NFL Insider analysts Gary Horton, Matt Williamson and Field Yates, graded the players headed for the open market. The soon-to-be former Eagles didn’t exactly make the dean’s list.

Quarterback Michael Vick rates only a C-plus and this comment: “The offseason market for Vick will require a perfect system fit. He brings with him age and injury concerns, but if you're a team like Jacksonville or a team with a rookie QB coming out of the 2014 draft, he's a free agent who could buy time as a starter. He could also be a fit as a backup for a team like San Francisco or Seattle, where he could replicate some of the athletic traits possessed by Colin Kaepernick and Russell Wilson.”

Funny to see Vick described as someone who can “replicate” the athleticism and mobility that he helped pioneer in the league. The lackluster evaluation makes you wonder if Vick will get that starting opportunity he covets.

Safety Nate Allen received a grade of C: “Allen is a free safety who is best suited for the box. He shows good instincts and awareness, and he is tough against the run and in underneath coverage. He lacks range over the top, however.”

Allen is rated as “neutral” for all four categories rated -- speed, production, injury and character.

Defensive end Clifton Geathers was rated as “neutral” for all four as well. Geathers also got a C from Polian: “Geathers possesses a long body and good first-step quickness. His length allows him to be a good pass-rusher, but he doesn't have the explosive quickness of the top pass-rushers, nor the explosive run leverage of a power player. He's kind of a tweener but can be a good, solid backup.”

Sounds right, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the Eagles bring Geathers back once the market settles a bit.

Polian slapped D grades on safeties Colt Anderson and Kurt Coleman, as well as punter Donnie Jones. The grade on Jones is understandable if it is based on his entire career. Jones punted very well for the Eagles last year and could be signed to a new contract as soon as the new league year starts on Monday.

The highest-graded Eagles? Wide receivers Riley Cooper (B) and Jeremy Maclin (B-minus), who signed new contracts with the team last week. Maclin’s grade was clearly lower because he’s coming off a serious knee injury.
PHILADELPHIA -- Since Eagles general manager Howie Roseman said the team would like to address the safety position before the draft -- in other words, during free agency -- he couldn't be certain what the market would look like.

He still can't. But as other teams clear roster spots (and cap space) and with the window open for using franchise and transition tags now open, there is more clarity every day.

Two of the elite safeties due for free agency, Cleveland's T.J. Ward and Buffalo's Jairus Byrd, could be tagged. That would not only take them off the market, it would have a domino effect on the players who do hit free agency. A guy like Miami's Chris Clemons might command more money than he would if Ward and Byrd were in the market.

And then there's San Francisco's Donte Whitner. The 49ers want him back, but it might be tougher to negotiate a new deal without using a tag on him if he is by far the best safety available.

Judging by Roseman's comments, he isn't likely to get in a mad bidding war for the hot commodity. The Eagles' recent approach has been to look for value among players in the second tier, after the market settles a little bit.

In that sense, the picture has improved for the Eagles in recent days. New Orleans released Roman Harper and Detroit parted ways with Louis Delmas late last week. Whether they are good fits in Philadelphia or not, they add to the pool of available talent and create more options.

Delmas is an interesting possibility. He is only 27, same as Ward and Byrd. He is a relatively physical player who has had some knee trouble. That could actually help keep his asking price down, which might make him that much more appealing to the Eagles.

Delmas was taken one pick ahead of Patrick Chung in the 2009 draft. But then, the Eagles took Nate Allen one pick ahead of Ward in the 2010 draft.

Allen and Chung finished the season as the Eagles' starting safeties. Rookie Earl Wolff had taken Chung's starting job before injuring his knee in Green Bay in October.

Allen will be an unrestricted free agent, as will safeties/special-teamers Kurt Coleman and Colt Anderson. With the Eagles lukewarm on Chung, there could be as many as four roster spots open for safeties.

Roseman said recently that he doesn't want to go into the draft with a gaping hole on his roster. That, he said, leads to mistakes as teams reach for a position of need. So it is likely the Eagles will look to add safeties in free agency. The market is shaping up.
PHILADELPHIA -- The secondary was already the Philadelphia Eagles' most obvious need area. After watching the NFL postseason, especially the Super Bowl, that need looked even more glaring.

Put another way: The Eagles got by with their secondary in 2013. Elite defenses do better than get by. Their safeties and cornerbacks are impact players.

Let’s look at the more dire safety situation first. We’ll address the cornerback position in a separate post.

Good safeties have been as elusive as unicorns for the Eagles since Brian Dawkins' unfortunate departure five years ago. (Say that out loud: Dawk's been gone for five years.) They have tried nearly everything to fill that void: second-round draft picks, second-day draft picks, midlevel free agents.

[+] EnlargeT.J. Ward
David Dermer/Diamond Images/Getty ImagesIt might be time for the Eagles to pursue a starting safety in free agency, like Cleveland's T.J. Ward.
As it happens, three of the safeties on the Eagles’ roster are to become unrestricted free agents next month: starter Nate Allen, former starter Kurt Coleman, and special-teamer Colt Anderson.

That should be viewed as an opportunity more than a problem. By doing nothing, the Eagles can start the process of turning over this part of their roster. They can really turn the page if they release Patrick Chung, who lost his starting job twice during the season.

That would leave Earl Wolff, last year’s fifth-round draft pick and the guy who took Chung’s job before getting hurt, and Keelan Johnson as the only two safeties on the roster.

When we said the Eagles have tried nearly everything, it’s because the one thing they haven’t done is sign a top-level free agent. For years, the Eagles rated the safety position fairly low on their list of priorities. Dawkins was a homegrown superstar who transcended the position, but their emphasis was always on edge pass-rushers and cornerbacks.

General manager Howie Roseman has said the team will avoid splurging on big-ticket signings, and that is a reasonable position. But one reason the team has struggled to resolve the safety problem is its insistence on mediocre, small-ticket free agents. Chung and Kenny Phillips were last year’s additions to a list that includes Sean Jones, Jarrad Page, Marlin Jackson and O.J. Atogwe.

Maybe Buffalo’s Jairus Byrd or Cleveland’s T.J. Ward will demand too much money to be options, but this might be the year the Eagles have to pay full-market price at this most challenging of positions. Miami’s Chris Clemons might be a better value signing.

You could make a case for retaining Allen, who had his best season. Maybe spending more time in Bill Davis’ defense will help Allen continue to grow. But the feeling here is that Allen personifies the concept of just getting by at the safety spot. The Eagles are not going to be a tough, hard-hitting, intimidating defense like Seattle or San Francisco by just getting by.

Sign one starter (Ward, preferably) and at least one veteran who can compete for playing time. Hope Wolff can lock down one starting position with a full offseason and some experience under his belt. Give Johnson a chance to earn a roster spot with special-teams play.

The timing is treacherous. If the Eagles allow Allen, Coleman and Anderson to walk, they will have to move quickly in free agency to fill at least a couple of those spots. They can hang on to Chung as security until they do. But the worst-case scenario is going into the draft in May with a desperate need for safety help.

The Eagles have done that before, and it has not ended well. But then, nothing they’ve done at safety has gone much better.

The next big thing: Eagles

January, 23, 2014
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PHILADELPHIA -- With the draft so far off this year – May! – the next major item on the Eagles’ to-do list is deciding on a strategy for free agency, which begins March 11.

General manager Howie Roseman has repeatedly said the team will continue to avoid huge free-agent deals in favor of making a number of smaller, less risky investments on the open market. That approach brought Connor Barwin, Cary Williams, Bradley Fletcher and Donnie Jones last offseason. It also brought Patrick Chung, James Casey and Kenny Phillips, moves that didn’t hamstring the franchise when performance didn’t equal compensation.

Before getting to March 11, though, the first order of business is deciding how to handle the current Eagles with expiring contracts. That group includes Michael Vick, who wants to explore opportunities to start, wide receivers Riley Cooper and Jeremy Maclin, and safeties Nate Allen, Kurt Coleman and Colt Anderson.

The Eagles could have extended any of those contracts before now, so they’re clearly willing to risk losing any or all of those players once the market opens. The best guess here is the team will wait and see if the market convinces Cooper, Maclin and Allen that their best option is to remain in Philadelphia on reasonable contracts. If not, then adios.

There are a handful of veteran players whose contracts could dictate some action. Will the Eagles hang on to players like Williams, Casey, Trent Cole, Brent Celek and Jason Avant?

Once those decisions are made, the Eagles can move on to the next Next Big Thing, signing free agents and preparing for the May (May!) draft.
PHILADELPHIA -- The Philadelphia Eagles may lack quality at the safety position, so they’re giving quantity a shot against the New Orleans Saints.

Wolff
Rookie safety Earl Wolff, listed as questionable with a knee injury, is active for Saturday night’s playoff game. Wolff has played only a single defensive series since injuring the knee Nov. 10 in Green Bay.

Veterans Patrick Chung and Kurt Coleman took first-team practice reps this week. So defensive coordinator Bill Davis is likely to use a rotation opposite safety Nate Allen in an attempt to find a solid combination. Colt Anderson, who is coming back from a knee injury, is also active.

The Eagles have five safeties active for this first-round playoff game. Davis only has to find two who can execute his defensive game plan.

Wide receiver/punt returner Damaris Johnson is inactive. That means DeSean Jackson will handle punt returns. It also means the Eagles will be without a speedy backup if Jackson is injured. Johnson has been active the last five games.

Backup center Julian Vandervelde is out because of a back injury. Left guard Evan Mathis, who was named to the AP All-Pro team this week, has practiced with the second team at center. He would fill in should starting center Jason Kelce be injured.
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Eagles safety Earl Wolff is inactive for Sunday night's showdown against the Dallas Cowboys.

Wolff missed four games after injuring his right knee in Green Bay Nov. 10. He returned for last week's game against Chicago but left after playing one series. Veteran Patrick Chung will start at safety in place of the rookie.

Backup safety Colt Anderson (hamstring) and backup center Julian Vandervelde, who were listed as out, were both inactive. Otherwise, it was the usual group: quarterback Matt Barkley, running back Matthew Tucker, offensive lineman Dennis Kelly and cornerback Curtis Marsh.

Offensive lineman Matt Tobin is active for the second time this season. He takes Vandervelde's spot on the 46-man roster, but would not play center if anything happened to starter Jason Kelce. That role would likely fall to left guard Evan Mathis.

As expected, Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo and inside linebacker Sean Lee are inactive. So is former Eagle Ernie Sims, which leaves Dallas even thinner at linebacker.

PHILADELPHIA -- Chip Kelly became the Eagles' head coach in January. He might have become Philadelphia's head coach Sunday night.

At about 4 p.m. ET, the Dallas Cowboys beat Washington with a late comeback, robbing the Eagles of a chance to clinch the division against the Chicago Bears. By about 9 p.m., the Eagles had a 21-0 lead on their way to a dominating 54-11 victory over a team that had its own division title on the line.

All that speculation about resting starters for the must-win game in Dallas next Sunday? Forget about it.

"Very simply, we're from Philadelphia and we fight," Kelly said. "If there's a game on, we're playing. End of story. And all this stuff about backing in, not worrying, all these other things, I have no idea.

"So many scenarios. What if there's a tie when we go play Dallas next week and we gave a game away last week? If we're going to line up and kick off, tell us what time to show up and we'll be there."

If there aren't “We're from Philadelphia and we fight” T-shirts rolling off a silk-screen machine somewhere, someone is missing a golden opportunity.

Kelly's demeanor might have been different if one of his key players had been injured. But that didn't happen. Even better, the players who might have been candidates for the injury-avoidance program were the ones who delivered the biggest momentum-building performances of the game.

LeSean McCoy ran for 133 yards and two touchdowns to retain his place atop the NFL rushing leaders list and position himself to break Wilbert Montgomery's franchise record for yards in a season next week. McCoy needs just 37 yards to break the mark of 1,512 yards.

Quarterback Nick Foles was nearly perfect, completing 21 of 25 passes (84 percent) for 230 yards and two touchdowns. Coming off an inconsistent performance against the Vikings, Foles now goes to Dallas with a hot hand.

“I'm just excited to play another game,” Foles said. “I know what's on the line. Everybody knows what's on the line. I'm excited for the opportunity.”

Trent Cole, the oldest player on the Eagles' defense, sacked Jay Cutler on the Bears' third play from scrimmage, setting a tone and forcing the Bears to punt. Cole had three sacks, his most in a game in three years.

“I was very excited for this game,” Cole said. “This is just the start. Coming off a loss like that, it's good for confidence in the team. This does build momentum for us going into Dallas. That's the start of our playoffs right there.”

Kelly convinced his team to treat this as a big game. The way his players responded has to be considered a good sign as they prepare for the franchise's biggest game since a playoff loss to Green Bay here after the 2011 season.

“It's going to be the biggest show on earth,” Cole said. “It's going to be a circus down there, like always.”

“This is what we want,” said linebacker Mychal Kendricks, who sacked Cutler twice and forced a fumble. “We're on the biggest stage. We're in Dallas' stadium, which is a great place to play. We're excited.”

Not only did the Eagles not want to sit this one out, veterans were volunteering for hazardous duty. With key special teamers Kurt Coleman and Colt Anderson sidelined by injuries, starting cornerbacks Cary Williams and Bradley Fletcher were covering kickoffs -- as if holding receivers Brandon Marshall and Alshon Jeffery in check wasn't enough to worry about.

“Whatever it takes, man,” Williams said. “No 'I' in 'team.' Coach needed me to do that, then dang it, I'm going to do it. It didn't matter. It was a great game plan we had in place. There were a lot of DBs out there. It didn't bother us, because the game was so significant. We wanted to get back to winning ways.”

Fletcher forced Bears kickoff returner Devin Hester to fumble in the first quarter. Williams recovered, giving the Eagles the ball at the Chicago 39.

“That's what we do,” nickel corner and special-teams regular Brandon Boykin said. “That's our personality. The starters on kickoffs, that's the want-to, that's the attitude of our team. Get the job done no matter who's out there.”

The Eagles scored on McCoy's 1-yard run five plays later, their second touchdown in 2 minutes, 10 seconds. It was 14-0, and the Eagles were on their way.

It was hard to believe they were the same players who got crushed by the Vikings the week before.

“Redeeming ourselves,” Boykin said. “That was huge, man. It was a great team win. Knowing where we are, knowing our possibilities, we wanted to come out and get our momentum rolling again. Especially at home, Sunday night football. There's nothing better.”

It's also hard to believe this is the same Eagles offense that failed to score a touchdown against the Cowboys here in the teams' first meeting this season. That was Oct. 20. The Eagles lost the next week to the Giants, falling to 3-5 at the midway point of the season.

They are 6-1 since then, with the only loss that mystifying game in Minnesota.

“We stumbled when we were in Minnesota,” Kelly said. “Minnesota beat us and played better than us that day. But we weren't going to let Minnesota beat us twice.”

Now the task is not letting Dallas beat them twice. Win next week, and they earn the No. 3 seed in the NFC. For Kelly, it also would mean eliminating the rival Cowboys. There's no better way to win over Eagles fans.

“One down, one to go,” Kelly said.
PHILADELPHIA -- The Philadelphia Eagles' injury report contained mixed news for Sunday night's game against the Chicago Bears.

Safeties Kurt Coleman (hamstring) and Colt Anderson (knee) are out. That has more impact on the Eagles' special teams than their defense. Both players are key members of the kicking and return teams.

Wolff
The defense will be helped by the likely return of safety Earl Wolff, who is listed as probable after missing five games with a knee injury. Nickel cornerback Brandon Boykin, who was knocked out of last week's game with a concussion, was also listed as probable.

That gives defensive coordinator Bill Davis close to a full complement of defensive backs as he tries to cope with the Bears' array of receiving options. Chicago likes to use wide receiver Brandon Marshall in the slot a fair percentage of the time.

Boykin
"They look for him," Boykin said. "I plan on being matched up with him quite a bit."

Although the Eagles have faced Denver's group, Dez Bryant, Larry Fitzgerald and Calvin Johnson, Boykin said he thought the Bears' Marshall and Alshon Jeffery presented the biggest overall challenge to the secondary.

"You're talking about guys that are 6-3, 6-4 and they're both playing at a very, very high level," Boykin said. "Normally, you might have two big guys, but one of them is better than the other. I don't think that's the case. They can throw to either one of them."

"Whenever the quarterback throws the ball in the air," Wolff said, "they go and get it. Those are the big plays we're going to have to stop. I feel like we're up for the challenge."

Wolff may be eased back into action after missing so much time. Patrick Chung could start and play a fair amount.

"I feel like I came in this week in a groove more than I was last week," Wolff said. "Last week, I was still kind of trying to get back into it. Now I feel like I'm pretty much back to where I was before."

As for special teams, the Eagles are likely to have linebacker Najee Goode back from his hamstring injury. He was also listed as questionable. Keelan Johnson, a safety signed off the practice squad earlier in the week, could also be active and help fill in for Coleman and Anderson.

Linebacker Mychal Kendricks (knee) and wide receiver/special teamer Brad Smith (hamstring) were also listed as questionable.

Eagles add safety to muddled secondary

December, 17, 2013
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PHILADELPHIA – Figuring there’s safety in numbers, the Philadelphia Eagles added to the number of safeties in their injury-strewn secondary Tuesday. They signed Keelan Johnson off their practice squad, releasing linebacker Emmanuel Acho to create a roster spot.

Going into their Sunday night game against the Chicago Bears’ high-powered offense, the Eagles have serious issues with four of their safeties, plus nickel corner Brandon Boykin.

Rookie starter Earl Wolff, who injured his knee six weeks ago in Green Bay, said he expects to play.

“I’ll be probable, which means I’ll probably play,” Wolff said. “If the game was today, I would play. On Sunday, it just didn’t feel right. I thought this would be three or four weeks. I didn’t think it would be this long.”

Safeties Kurt Coleman (hamstring) and Colt Anderson (knee) were injured Sunday in Minnesota. Both are also important special-teams players. That is the role Johnson likely would fill if he is active for the Bears game.

“Right now, it’s just about trying to get healthy and help this team out,” Coleman said. “We’re trying to make a push for the playoffs. I’ve got to get better as fast as possible because we need everyone out there.”

The other safety with issues is veteran Patrick Chung. In his case, the issues are related to performance, not any injury. Eagles defensive coordinator Bill Davis said Chung was in “a slump” that had the coaches moving Coleman into the lineup before he was hurt.

“Until they separate themselves,” Davis said, “I’ll let the competition get the best out of both of them.”

Wolff had separated himself from Chung earlier in the season before getting hurt.

“He was starting to really show some playmaking ability,” Davis said. “He got injured and has been out for a while. We have to crawl him back into the mix as we go.”

Boykin was knocked out of the Minnesota game with a concussion. He was out on the practice field Tuesday, which is a positive sign, but he still has to be cleared according to the NFL concussion protocol. If Boykin can’t play, Davis said, either Chung or cornerback Roc Carmichael would move into his role in the slot.

“For me, I like playing outside more,” Carmichael said. “That’s what I’ve done my whole career. But going into the inside, it’s still a defensive-back position. Playing man will be the same, but now I have to learn more of the zones – which 'backer do I have to help, is the end going to drop, little things like that.”

The 5-foot-11, 212-pound Johnson was in training camp with the Miami Dolphins. He signed to the Eagles' practice squad in September.

Eagles' defense regroups for Bears

December, 17, 2013
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PHILADELPHIA -- Coming off a game in which his defense gave up 48 points and lost three more defensive backs to injuries, Eagles defensive coordinator Bill Davis called Sunday’s visit from the Chicago Bears “our biggest challenge of the season.”

That’s quite a distinction, considering the Eagles have faced Peyton Manning (allowing 52 points), Philip Rivers (33 points), Jamaal Charles (26 points), Larry Fitzgerald (21 points) and Calvin Johnson (20 snow-covered points).

But Davis was taking in all the factors: A game with enormous playoff implications for the Bears and possibly the Eagles; quarterback Jay Cutler and his array of weapons, including Brandon Marshall, Alshon Jeffery, Martellus Bennett and Matt Forte, and a secondary thrown into disarray by injuries and poor performance.

“Chicago might be one of the most talented offenses we face,” Davis said. “They’re obviously in the top five in scoring. They’ve got the big, physical Pro Bowl receivers – two of them. They’ve got a tight end who’s a big, athletic pass receiving tight end. The running back is as rounded as any running back we’ve faced.”

That would sound daunting coming off the nine consecutive games in which the Eagles' defense held the opposing team to 21 points or fewer. Coming off Sunday’s debacle in Minnesota, and dealing with the smoking ruins of his secondary, you can see why Davis is concerned.

Nickel cornerback Brandon Boykin, who leads the team with four interceptions, has a concussion. His availability will be determined by the NFL concussion protocol. He would be replaced by safety Patrick Chung or cornerback Roc Carmichael, or a combination of both.

Davis may get rookie safety Earl Wolff back after a five-week absence due a knee injury. But Davis said Wolff will have to “crawl” back into the lineup before he’s completely back to where he was in early November.

Wolff’s replacement, the veteran Chung, was benched in favor of Kurt Coleman. Davis revealed Tuesday that decision was made before the game.

“Pat and Kurt knew we were rotating every two series,” Davis said. “Now we were rotating because Patrick is in a little bit of a slump. We were prepared in practice, we were 50/50 with the reps. That wasn’t something that was a knee-jerk reaction.”

Coleman injured his hamstring and spent the second half in the locker room getting treatment. Colt Anderson, who plays mostly special teams, injured his knee while pressed into service on defense.

Davis said Wolff and Coleman are “day to day,” while Anderson is “more week to week.”

And those are just the injured players. Davis also has to regroup with starting cornerbacks, Cary Williams and Bradley Fletcher, who are coming off their worst performance since the Denver game. Safety Nate Allen earned the distinction of being the least-bad defensive back of the day for the Eagles.

“It is a well-rounded offense that’s coming at us,” Davis said. “We had a bad day in Minnesota. They’re in the right mindset. Nobody’s pouting about last week. We accepted it, we owned up to it, we talked about the mistakes. Now we’re going forward and we’re going to attack Chicago with everything we have.”
PHILADELPHIA -- Eagles coach Chip Kelly said he will not rest any starters if Sunday night’s game against the Chicago Bears becomes meaningless. Here’s a look at that issue and a few other highlights from Kelly’s Monday presser.

No rest. If the Dallas Cowboys beat Washington Sunday afternoon, the Bears-Eagles game will have no impact on the NFC East race. Regardless of the outcome, the Eagles will win the division if they beat Dallas the next week.

“We’ll know the score,” Kelly said. “People have phones and TVs.”

But he said he would not alter his approach no matter what happens.

“We’ve got to play,” Kelly said. “We’re not in a situation where we’re going to rest anybody. We’ve got to play. We’ve got to get back on a winning track. We’ve got to be ready to play winning football. Our philosophy has always been, it’s on the line every single time you play. It’s not what goes on outside. We need to get better as a football team. Everybody needs to play.”

The game will have an impact on the NFC North race, so there is an element of competitive integrity as well. And an extra win could boost the Eagles from the No. 4 seed to the No. 3 seed if they win the division.

But Kelly said his only concern was sending a consistent message to his team.

“I don’t think we’re going to have a victory party and say, 'Oh, heck, we’ve got to get over to the stadium to play,’" Kelly said.

Out of whack. Kelly defended the play calling that saw LeSean McCoy get only eight carries in Sunday’s 48-30 loss to the Vikings.

“They were definitely playing single-high safety and always had an extra guy down in there,” Kelly said. “There was always going to be an unblocked guy within 2 or 3 yards of the line of scrimmage. That was a little bit different kind of approach. But if you’re going to do that, you have to play man coverage behind it.”

Kelly said that allowed him to get McCoy the ball in the passing game.

“We went for it on fourth-and-a-half-yard and we did not get it,” Kelly said. “I was kicking myself in the tail. We should have thrown a pass in that situation.”

But there were series in which Kelly called all pass plays and the Eagles went three-and-out. A week after McCoy ran for 217 yards, it seemed as if the offense was terribly out of balance.

“It’s hard when you’re not successful,” Kelly said. “If you’re not moving the football, then it’s hard. I would argue the Vikings were very successful in how they threw the ball against us. Didn’t run the ball all that often. But they threw the heck out of it.”

Actually, the Vikings ran the ball 35 times. They stuck with Matt Asiata running the ball some 30 times even though he was averaging just 1.7 yards per carry. McCoy averaged 4.8 yards on his eight carries.

Secondary concerns. The Eagles' secondary was torched for 382 yards, two touchdowns and a bunch of big plays. With Jay Cutler, Brandon Marshall and Alshon Jeffery coming to town, that has to be addressed.

But first, the coaches have to know who will be available.

“Trying to find out what our health is is an important thing,” Kelly said.

Rookie safety Earl Wolff could be ready to return from his knee injury. But Brandon Boykin (possible concussion), Kurt Coleman (hamstring) and Colt Anderson (knee) were injured during the game.

Safety Patrick Chung is healthy, but he was benched for performance reasons in favor of Coleman. Chung returned when Coleman went down. Cornerbacks Cary Williams and Bradley Fletcher played their worst game of the season.

“That’s a big concern for us,” Kelly said of the injury issue.

Rapid Reaction: Philadelphia Eagles

December, 15, 2013
12/15/13
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MINNEAPOLIS -- Quick thoughts on the Philadelphia Eagles' ugly 48-30 loss to the Minnesota Vikings on Sunday:

What it means: Eagles coach Chip Kelly officially has a bad loss on his NFL résumé. His Eagles were in first place in the NFC East, facing a 3-9-1 team without its best player, running back Adrian Peterson. Instead of securing their hold on a playoff berth, the Eagles were flat and looked unprepared and poorly coached in all three phases. Kelly didn’t use running back LeSean McCoy enough and handed the Vikings three points by going for a fourth-and-1 at his own 24-yard line in the third quarter. Defensive coordinator Bill Davis had no answers for Matt Cassel, even with the Vikings down to a practice-squad running back. Special-teams coach Dave Fipp’s plan to kick away from Cordarrelle Patterson gave the Vikings great field position all game.

Shredded and wounded: Philadelphia's secondary was terrible even before losing nickel corner Brandon Boykin (possible concussion) and safety Kurt Coleman (hamstring). Cassel beat the Eagles deep for a 57-yard touchdown to Greg Jennings in the first quarter. He was able to convert third downs all too easily. Safety Patrick Chung was benched in favor of Coleman, then had to return when Coleman got hurt. Colt Anderson, forced into action, got burned on a big play by tight end Chase Ford. To make matters worse, the secondary committed a rash of penalties in the fourth quarter to fuel a Vikings touchdown drive.

Stock watch: Falling: Nick Foles. He wasn’t Sports Illustrated-cover-jinx terrible, but the magic carpet ride is over. Foles took sacks by holding the ball too long. He threw a jump ball for DeSean Jackson that was intercepted. Foles was also called for a penalty for an illegal block, which negated a Jackson touchdown run on a reverse. Foles threw three second-half touchdown passes, but his chance to stage a comeback win was undermined by the Eagles’ inability to stop the Vikings at all.

What’s next: The Eagles face two must-win games. They host the Chicago Bears next week in a game that was flexed into prime time. Then they finish the regular season at the Dallas Cowboys, a game that could decide the NFC East title. The Eagles, who would lose on tiebreakers if they finish with the same record as the Cowboys, made things harder on themselves by not taking care of the Vikings.

Examining the special-teams breakdowns

September, 30, 2013
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PHILADELPHIA -- You know it was a rough game when the head coach resorts to comments like this the next day:

“And I think in special teams, aside from the punt block and that kickoff return, we are getting a decent job and decent effort out of those guys,” Eagles head coach Chip Kelly said.

And aside from that iceberg, the Titanic had a decent first voyage. Kelly has stressed the importance of special teams in everything from roster building to practice time allotted. So it is especially galling to have his kicking game blow up on him during a 52-20 drubbing in Denver on Sunday.

The kickoff return was a 105-yard sprint by speedster Trindon Holliday. Holliday fielded Alex Henery’s kick slightly to the Eagles’ left. Several players, including Najee Goode and Casey Matthews, drifted toward that side and got caught up in a crowd of blockers when Holliday made a decisive cut to their right.

Jeff Maehl, part of Kelly’s Oregon alumni club, had the outside edge. He was wiped out by safety Duke Ihenacho. That allowed Holliday to build up speed. Rookie cornerback Jordan Poyer ran right into a block by Steven Johnson, who body-slammed Poyer. That left Henery, who made a feeble effort as Holliday blazed by.

The punt block in the fourth quarter was simple carelessness.

“You can’t make mistakes like that,” Kelly said. “It wasn’t even a designed punt block. We had a guy trying to escape and get down the field too quick trying to cover the punt and not take care of the little things.”

The “little thing” in this case was blocking Johnson, who lined up between long-snapper Jon Dorenbos and Brandon Graham, who was at right guard. Colt Anderson was the up back on that side.

At the snap, Graham fired toward his right, allowing Johnson to run right by. Johnson grazed Dorenbos, who fired to his left to make a block. Anderson, who is likely the player Kelly described, ran downfield without noticing a defender rushing right past his spot. Johnson made the block easily, then scooped up the ball and ran it in for a touchdown.

“It's not like we put in a new scheme or something special for the Broncos game,” Kelly said. “And then you look at it, that scheme kind of backfired. It's base fundamental coverage and base fundamental protection and then coverage that we didn't get done on those two particular plays.”
The Philadelphia Eagles’ waiver-wire spree didn’t really materialize Sunday. The team was awarded just one player, former Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Shaun Prater.

One possible reason for the relatively light activity: The Jacksonville Jaguars, who are two spots higher than the Eagles on waiver claims, were awarded a stunning seven players. That included two players, DE/LB Chris McCoy and TE Clay Harbor, who were released by the Eagles.

Prater is 5-foot-10, 190 pounds. A fifth-round pick out of Iowa last year, Prater spent his rookie season on injured reserve with patellar tendinitis. He is not expected to be a factor right away. The Eagles will roll with Cary Williams and Bradley Fletcher (who played with Prater at Iowa) outside and Brandon Boykin in the slot.

But at least Prater can practice and play. To make room for him, the Eagles released Curtis Marsh, another member of their disastrous 2011 draft class. Marsh had surgery on his broken hand last month and was not available for the last two preseason games.

A couple of other roster-related notes:
  • The Eagles signed four players to their practice squad, all of whom were released over the weekend: OT Michael Bamiro, RB Matthew Tucker, WR Greg Salas and LB Travis Long. They have four more spots to fill.
  • Didn’t do too poorly on my projected 53-man roster, which was posted Friday morning. I had 48 players right. And where I was incorrect, I might have been right in a couple of spots where the Eagles turn out to be wrong.I had McCoy staying and Casey Matthews going. We’ll see how that one turns out.

    I had Salas and Russell Shepard among six wide receivers. The Eagles kept five, including Jeff Maehl. That’s two Oregon guys who made the team that I didn’t expect.

    I thought they’d keep 10 offensive linemen, including Matt Tennant. They went light there, cutting Tennant, and kept one more tight end than I expected: Emil Igwenagu.

    Finally, they kept two more DBs than I expected. One was Colt Anderson, who will play only on special teams. The other was Marsh, who was released today. So maybe I had 4.5 players wrong.
  • Roseman made two trades involving a running back for a linebacker. He got Emmanuel Acho, who made the team, for Dion Lewis, who is on IR in Cleveland. And he got Adrian Robinson, who was cut Friday, for Felix Jones, who made the Steelers roster.
  • The Eagles were off today and have some conditioning work scheduled for Monday. They’ll be off again Tuesday. The practice week for Monday night’s game at Washington begins in earnest on Wednesday.

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