Mitchell plan could serve Steelers well


PITTSBURGH -- Mike Mitchell made a solid first impression during his introductory news conference on Thursday, and the Pittsburgh Steelers are hoping the safety who is counted on to replace Ryan Clark makes an equally impressive impact on the field.

Mitchell, who represents one of the bigger investments the Steelers have made in free agency, moved seamlessly between confidence and humility while delivering several pointed messages.

Mitchell said his best football is in front of him and that if it doesn't work out in Pittsburgh it won’t be because of a lack of effort.

“I work extremely hard,” Mitchell said to an audience that included Steelers president Art Rooney II as well as his parents. “I can say this with the utmost confidence: If you put me in a room with anyone, I think he’s going to die first when it comes to working out. I just have that work ethic and tenacity.”

Mitchell sounded a lot like Clark, and there are notable similarities.

Like Clark, Mitchell is of the belief that hard hits and intimidation are still the essence of football no matter how much NFL commissioner Roger Goodell tries to emphasize safety.

He also uses perceived slights to drive him, and in Mitchell's case they range from getting overlooked by the alpha college programs to the criticism he received during the four seasons he spent with the Raiders.

“I play with a very big chip on my shoulder, and just because you went to LSU and I went to Ohio (University) you’re no better than me, and I look forward to proving that every single Sunday,” Mitchell said.

It is probably just a coincidence that Mitchell invoked Clark’s alma mater when discussing his approach to football. The two could probably have a heck of debate about who was overlooked more, Mitchell coming out of high school outside of Cincinnati, or the undrafted Clark coming out of college.

All that really matters to the Steelers is that Mitchell, 26, can play like a younger Clark and complement Troy Polamalu in the secondary.

All signs point to him doing just that – and at a more than reasonable price considering only $5.25 million of the $25 million contract that Mitchell signed this week is guaranteed.

Mitchell put everything together after leaving Oakland for Carolina, and he thrived when he got a chance to start on a regular basis for the first time in his career.

Mitchell intercepted four passes and forced two fumbles in the one season he played for the Panthers, also recording 3 sacks and 74 tackles.

That stat line suggests a varied skill set that defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau is sure to put to good use in 2014.

Mitchell chatted up LeBeau at the Steelers’ practice facility before the news conference that general manager Kevin Colbert and coach Mike Tomlin could not attend because they were at Oklahoma State’s pro day.

Mitchell could make LeBeau look a lot smarter this fall if his ball skills transfer from Carolina, and if he is indeed correct that he has yet to play his best football.

“Every year I feel like I’m getting smarter, taking care of my body better,” Mitchell said. “I look very much forward to helping (the Steelers) get back to being that dominant defense that they’ve been.”

Steelers fans apparently feel the same way.

Mitchell said he added close to 10,000 Twitter followers after tweeting on Tuesday night that he had signed with the Steelers.

The “warm feeling” he said he received from Steelers fans isn’t the only reason why Mitchell checks his Twitter account on a regular basis.

Mitchell, who was such an unknown that even ESPN draft guru Mel Kiper Jr. had to scramble for information to discuss after the Raiders made him a surprise second-round pick in 2009, actually embraces the dark side of social media.

The more blistering the criticism the better when it comes to Mitchell, who will apparently find an edge wherever he can and use it to his advantage.

“Those type of things are what motivates me and helps me get out of bed in the morning,” Mitchell said.

The 6-foot, 210-pounder also finds motivation while walking past the library where the Steelers' six Lombardi Trophies are displayed.

“This is definitely a life-changing experience,” Mitchell said. "I know what the franchise is about, and the way that they play football here I really think fits my personality, it’s very hard-nosed. I can't wait to get to work."