Ike Taylor's comments are baffling

July, 1, 2014
Jul 1
11:00
AM ET
PITTSBURGH – The anger that had been simmering in Ike Taylor since March boiled over Monday when the veteran cornerback lashed out at having to accept a $4.25 million pay cut to remain with the Steelers.

Taylor’s rant on "The Jim Rome Show" didn’t make sense for a couple of reasons.

First, he didn’t say anything about his unhappiness over the pay cut during organized team activities or minicamp. Nor did he mention it on the weekly show he has on TribLive Radio.

Taylor
So why go public with it now?

Taylor seemed genuinely miffed that the Steelers would ask him to take pay cut after he has done the right things during his 11-year career, one in which he has missed just five games because of injuries and kept himself in excellent physical condition.

But how does doing what is required make Taylor exempt from the kind of business decisions that are common in the NFL? It's something he has seen the Steelers do through the years to help manage their salary cap.

The fact is the Steelers had some tough decisions to make to clear enough room under the cap so they could continue reshaping a roster that has been in transition.

It was simply business and Taylor, who has a close relationship with Steelers chairman emeritus Dan Rooney, should know as well as anybody not to take it personally.

His heated comments created a stir during the time of the year when the NFL news cycle is at its slowest. But in the grand scheme of things, they don’t mean much.

Taylor is too much of a professional to allow his dissatisfaction to adversely affect his preparation for 2014, a year after his play slipped appreciably, leading to a situation in which the Steelers had all of the leverage.

He will be asked about his comments at the beginning of training camp. After that they will become a non-story.

Taylor isn’t the first Steeler who will play with a contract that doesn’t make him happy. And he certainly won’t be the last.

Scott Brown

ESPN Pittsburgh Steelers reporter

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