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Top play winner: Immaculate Reception

7/11/2014
AP Photo/Harry Cabluck

We have a winner. And was there even a doubt? The voters picked "Immaculate Reception" as the Pittsburgh Steelers' most memorable play and I applaud their selection.

Score: Steelers 13, Raiders 7

Date: Dec. 23, 1972. Site: Three Rivers Stadium

The irony for a franchise that has so many great plays in its illustrious history is that there is really only one choice for the most memorable one.

Franco Harris' "Immaculate Reception" won that designation in fan voting on ESPN.com by a landslide over James Harrison's 100-yard interception return in Super Bowl XLIII and Santonio Holmes' toe-tapping touchdown catch in the same game.

The fans got this right, even though the play that went in the books as a 60-yard touchdown catch did not come in any one of the six seasons in which the Steelers won the Super Bowl.

First and foremost, it gave a franchise that had never won a playoff game and its long-suffering fans belief. That had been in short supply in the near four decades that followed the Steelers' founding in 1933 by Art Rooney.

Harris changed that when he snatched a pass that had ricocheted back with the Steelers facing certain defeat in an AFC playoff game and then rumbled down the left sideline for the winning touchdown.

The 1974 NFL draft, when the Steelers took four future Pro Football Hall of Famers with their first five picks, ultimately put them over the top and led to four Super Bowl victories in six seasons.

But Harris' miraculous play put the Steelers on the course that transformed them from perennial also-rans to the team of the 1970s.

How much it is still a part of Pittsburgh lore -- and how it transcends sports -- can be seen in Pittsburgh International Airport. There are two life-sized statues in the main concourse. One is of our first president, George Washington, who fought in the French and Indian War in Western Pennsylvania. The other statue is of Harris making the most famous shoestring catch in NFL history.

It remains one of the NFL's most iconic plays and is a timeless reminder of playing to the final whistle -- in life as well as in sports.

In the end, every other Steelers play is still vying for second place when it comes to the most memorable one in franchise history.