Browns' Brian Hoyer OK with his role

September, 3, 2014
Sep 3
6:50
PM ET
PITTSBURGH -- Brian Hoyer spent a couple of weeks with the Steelers in 2012 when the team needed quarterback depth because of injuries.

One of his fondest memories from his brief time in Pittsburgh is when he ran into defensive coordinator and fellow Ohio native Dick LeBeau shortly after the Steelers released him.

Hoyer
"He said, ‘It was great to have you here. If I can ever help you with anything you let me know,' " Hoyer recalled late Wednesday afternoon during a conference call with the Pittsburgh media. "I don't know if that offer is still on the table now that I'm the Browns quarterback but what a great guy and a great coach."

That offer is likely suspended until further notice and LeBeau will be anything but helpful to Hoyer on Sunday when the AFC North rivals meet at Heinz Field.

Hoyer will start in the 1 p.m. ET game, though the Steelers are also expecting to see Johnny Manziel.

That the journeyman is already sharing time at quarterback reflects how tenuous Hoyer's hold on the starting job is with Manziel considered the quarterback of the future.

One thing that the Browns probably love about Hoyer is his maturity and how he has dealt with Manziel mania. Hoyer praised Manziel's work with ethic on Wednesday and said he has no problem ceding snaps to the former Heisman Trophy winner if it benefits the team.

"If it can help us win then that's all I care about," Hoyer said. "Obviously you want to be the guy on the field but if there's a certain situation that they think (Manziel) helps us win that's what this game is all about. It's the ultimate team sport."

Hoyer has seemingly been the ultimate team player since the Browns took Manziel in the first round of the draft.

He has blended in, something that is impossible for the polarizing Manziel to do -- ESPN NFL analyst Merrill Hoge ripped Johnny Football on Wednesday -- and adjusted to the circumstances that changed radically after the draft.

"I've eliminated watching ESPN, NFL Network, going on line, going on social media, reading the newspaper and it's actually made my life pretty simple," Hoyer said. "It's like you're living in the '60s or the '70s, you're not getting caught up in it."

Scott Brown

ESPN Pittsburgh Steelers reporter

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