Miserable start continues for Steelers

September, 23, 2013
9/23/13
7:45
AM ET
PITTSBURGH -- A 40-23 loss to the Chicago Bears on Sunday night exposed a widely held notion as the myth it has been through the first three weeks of the season: Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger’s brilliance is enough to mask the problems of the Steelers’ offense.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist Gene Collier wonders if Roethlisberger’s four turnovers against the Bears were a result of the 10th-year veteran trying to do too much. Roethlisberger’s miscues were the biggest reason the Steelers dropped to 0-3.

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review columnist Dejan Kovacevic re-visits his preseason prediction for the Steelers and notes that the team has surprised him, albeit not in a good way. As Kovacevic writes, there are so many issues facing this team that it is crazy to think the Steelers can get things turned around.

Steelers Digest’s Bob Labriola writes that the Steelers have to overcome their myriad problems in a tabloid atmosphere where any little sign of dissension will be magnified. But, Labriola says, the Steelers have brought it on themselves with their struggles and the fact that they have set the bar so high with their past success.

Beaver County Times’ Chris Bradford writes that offensive coordinator Todd Haley has plenty of company when it comes to the blame game. Roethlisberger had to shoulder much of the blame after the loss to the Bears because of his four turnovers.

Here are a couple of perspectives from beat writers Ed Bouchette and Alan Robinson. Bouchette of the Post-Gazette writes that the Steelers will try to avoid their first 0-4 start in 45 years when they travel to London.

Robinson of the Tribune-Review writes that the Steelers haven’t struggled this much since the days of Kent Graham playing quarterback in 2000.

The Post-Gazette’s Gerry Dulac hands out his Steelers grades following the loss to the Bears. Hint: he didn’t give too many passing ones.

Scott Brown

ESPN Pittsburgh Steelers reporter

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