Social media: Mayan apocalypse false start

December, 21, 2012
12/21/12
12:00
PM ET
If you’re reading this column, the Mayan apocalypse did not happen. We can all breathe a sigh of relief.

Maria Burns Ortiz logo
Never mind that the whole Mayan doomsday scenario was not something the actual Mayans predicted, but ridiculous speculation driven in large part by people on the Internet.

Yes, one of the ancient Mayan calendars did end Dec. 20, 2012. No, the end of the calendar did not mean the end of time. Considering we’ve been following a calendar that ends on Dec. 31 every year for centuries, you would think we would understand how calendars work.

The official odds on the apocalypse occurring Friday -- according to Irish bookmaker Paddy Power -- was 5,000-1. Not everyone thought such a gamble to be a wise investment.



As the theoretical end of the world drew near, many people – athletes among them -- took to social media to check in, sign off and share some #EndOfTheWorldConfessions.



Dolphins running back Reggie Bush encouraged people to avoid doing anything they might regret the day after the supposed end of days.



There was also some confusion about what time the whole apocalypse thing was actually going down.



Along that train of thought, many users checked in with folks living in time zones several hours ahead.



Although the apocalypse did not happen, its impending arrival did give us the greatest social media exchange in history between a major airline and an athlete.



Fortunately, the world didn’t end, meaning Morrison can go on his trip and the rest of us can go about our lives.

Elsewhere in the social mediasphere

After deleting his account in February, Oklahoma City Thunder center Kendrick Perkins returned to Twitter.

According to UFC president Dana White, all of the organization’s 475 signed fighters are on Twitter.

Oklahoma co-offensive coordinator Jay Norvell was cited by the NCAA for violating its recruiting rules as they apply to social media.

The Minnesota Vikings took to Facebook to make a case for running back Adrian Peterson as MVP.

Got a story we should feature? Have a site we should check out? Who's on your must-follow list? Tweet me at @BurnsOrtiz. If your idea gets mentioned in this column, so will you. Follow Playbook on Twitter at @ESPNPlaybook.
Maria Burns Ortiz covers social media for ESPN Playbook. She began writing for ESPN.com in 2006, covering college soccer for ESPNSoccernet.

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