Jerry Jones talks TV, stadium, cheerleaders

August, 17, 2012
8/17/12
10:00
AM ET
Jerry JonesAP Photo/James D SmithJerry Jones recently appeared on the show "Dallas," which shot a scene in Cowboys Stadium.
Sitting down with Jerry Jones at Dallas Cowboys training camp in Oxnard, Calif., I'm greeted with simple southern hospitality that's extended to anyone he meets. That holds true whether the person is a current member of the Cowboys family or a former Cowboys cheerleader like myself.

Jones' business savvy, along with the power of the Cowboys franchise and its brand, makes him one of the most powerful owners in sports.

We recently discussed his background, Cowboys Stadium and his appearance on "Dallas” in an interview for ESPN Playbook.

[+] EnlargeBonnie-Jill Laflin and Jerry Jones
Courtesy of Bonnie-Jill LaflinBonnie-Jill Laflin talked recently with Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones.
How did you enjoy your guest appearance on the new “Dallas”?

Jerry Jones: They've done a great job with this "Dallas." We all know what "Dallas" meant years ago. I enjoyed my scene with J.R. Ewing (Larry Hagman), but I'm particularly excited that they showed different perspectives, different views of the stadium. I especially liked the scene with the helicopter flying into the stadium. I personally walked off the measurements and had the helicopter pad put in.

What is your favorite part of the stadium?

The Glass. I spent hundreds of hours looking at models that would show 40, 50 and up to 90 feet of glass in some places. But inside the glass is a material that is denser on the bottom and less dense on the top. This material allows the glass to reflect the actual color of the sky on that particular day. If it's a grey cloudy day, then the stadium will have a silvery-grey appearance. If it's a bluebird day, it will be blue.

We all know Cowboys football is 24/7 for you, but besides football, what other interests do you have?

Hunting. Before the Cowboys, I would take my business [clients] on Thanksgiving and go into the darkest spots in Arkansas. I would grow a beard and not come out 'til Santa Claus came.

Most people associate you with Arkansas or Texas, but…

I was actually born in Southern California and I’m a favorite son of El Segundo. I have so many cousins out here, and they say, "But Jerry, we don’t sound like you." My family moved to Springfield, Mo., when I was in college, and they still have holdings and a ranch there.

Can you talk about your relationship with the "triplets" -- Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith and Michael Irvin -- and how close you are with them today?

Those relationships developed right when I first came into the NFL. I was 45 when I bought the Cowboys, so there was 20 years difference in age. One of the reasons I do what I do is because I don't look in the mirror and think, "I'm your age" or the players' age, although sometimes I act it. I take some of the things that have happened to me and, as a friend, share my experiences. Troy is a great friend. Michael and I have an outstanding relationship. He asked me to introduce him when he was enshrined into the Hall of Fame. We have a real bond. As for Emmitt, I can remember like it was yesterday when he came to me and asked if he could slide into the back of the office and listen to me on the phone on his breaks during training camp. He was hoping to be exposed to some of the business aspects of the sports industry. At first I was a little hesitant, but then it worked out and he did it for several years.

How important are cheerleaders to the Dallas Cowboys brand?

The cheerleaders have represented us well. They have entertained our troops and have done more USO Tours than Bob Hope. We don't have any part of the Cowboys legacy that is as well-respected as the cheerleaders. Our cheerleaders' appearances on battleships and behind the lines boost the morale of our troops. Of all of my "sweet nothings," and I call them my "sweet nothings," the biggest stack of letters of letters I have in my files are from people with 15-to-20 years of service, after seeing our cheerleaders and how much it meant to them.

Bonnie-Jill Laflin is a former NFL cheerleader and wrote this exclusively for ESPN.com.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

You must be signed in to post a comment

Already have an account?