Examples of how Harvin can change things

November, 6, 2013
11/06/13
8:00
AM ET
RENTON, Wash. -- Receiver Percy Harvin still may be a couple of weeks away from getting back on the field for a game, but there continues to be lots of speculation about what he can do to improve the Seattle offense when he finally get out there.

Here’s a more detailed look:

Harvin
Wilson
Harvin had 38 targets at or behind line of scrimmage last season for Minnesota (the most by a wide receiver in the NFL) and he only played in nine games. He gained 8.4 yards per reception on those passes.

This one area alone could make a big difference. Quarterback Russell Wilson has been sacked or put under duress on 40 percent of his dropbacks this season, the highest percentage for any quarterback in the past five seasons.

Being able to make quick throws to Harvin and have him gain meaningful yards off them would help take some of the pressure of Wilson.

Four of Wilson’s six interceptions have come when he was under duress. He has been forced to scramble due to pressure a league-high 19 times. Amazingly, Wilson has completed 50 percent of his passes when under duress, but 67.7 percent with no duress.

Getting both starting offensive tackles back in a couple of weeks certainly will help, but so will Harvin. He had 1,841 yards after the catch from 2009 to 2012, second most among all wide receivers.

Harvin also has great hands. He dropped only 2.8 percent of catchable throws his way from 2009 to 2012, third best among wide receivers with a minimum 300 targets.

So just get him the ball and he will make things happen. It shows why everyone is eager to see Harvin in action, but the Seattle coaches continue to take the cautious approach and want to be sure he’s 100 percent recovered from his hip surgery before playing in a game.

Terry Blount

ESPN Seattle Seahawks reporter

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