A surprise in the Sound-Off Saturday results

March, 31, 2014
Mar 31
8:00
AM ET
Save the money for more important things. That's the message from the voters in our Sound-off Saturday question on which remaining NFL free agent the Seahawks should sign.

Telling the Seahawks not to sign any other free agent received more than double the votes on any one player in the survey on the blog and on my Twitter page.

About 38 percent of the voters thought it was better to use the money to try to work out contract extensions for free safety Earl Thomas, cornerback Richard Sherman and quarterback Russell Wilson, when he's eligible to renegotiate after the 2014 season.

The second highest vote was receiver DeSean Jackson, who was released last week by Philadelphia. Jackson received 15 percent of the vote.

However, there is one interesting side note to the voting totals. Three wide receivers garnered votes -- Jackson, Kenny Britt and Miles Austin. If you count the total votes for all three receivers it comes up to 40 percent.

So if you look at it from that perspective, more voters want the Seahawks to sign a receiver than want them to skip any free-agent signing.

Seattle has about $14 million remaining under the salary cap for 2014, but at least half that amount needs to go to 2014 rookies, practice squad players and players who go on injured reserve.

Seahawks general manager John Schneider and coach Pete Carroll have stated numerous times that they are looking ahead to deals on players they need to keep. Consequently, they have shown they will not overpay for any player.

A couple of relatively minor free-agent signings still could happen. Seattle signed former Oakland cornerback Phillip Adams (who played for the Seahawks in 2011) to a one-year deal last week. And they may sign veteran free safety Ryan Clark to one-year deal to add depth.

But overall, the voters probably are right. Save the money and look ahead.

Terry Blount

ESPN Seattle Seahawks reporter

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