Lane Kiffin navigates media day with ease

August, 3, 2014
Aug 3
3:05
PM ET

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -- Nick Saban had a word of advice for Lane Kiffin as he prepared to address the media for the first time since taking over as Alabama's offensive coordinator: Don’t make any headlines.

“He made sure I didn’t say anything that would be on the ticker,” Kiffin said with a smile.

Kiffin smiled a lot Sunday. He joked about how when Saban called him in December to visit Alabama, “He knew I didn’t have much going on.” Asked about Alabama’s trip to Tennessee this year, Kiffin grinned and said, “It took a long time for the Knoxville question.” He was relaxed and, at times, even self-deprecating.

In his 15 minutes with the media, Kiffin didn’t put his foot in his mouth once. Saban would have been proud.

After so long butting heads with reporters, Kiffin was at ease Sunday. Maybe it was the knowledge that this would be the only time he would have to speak with the press during the regular season. More likely, it was because he’s a man unburdened by the duties of being a head coach. It was the look of a man who is aware of his unconventional career arc and believes that, despite all the turmoil, he’s on the right track.

After all, he’s only 39 years old. How many coaches would kill to be Alabama’s offensive coordinator at that age?

“To be able to go what I’ve gone through and still be fortunate before the age of 40 to be here and be an offensive coordinator with Coach Saban at Alabama, you take some time to reflect on that,” he said.

Kiffin didn’t bring up the Oakland Raiders. He said only the best of Tennessee. He mentioned being fired by USC but didn’t attempt to throw his former school under the bus. Rather, Kiffin said how proud he is now to have worked under two coaches he considers among the best in football: Pete Carroll and Nick Saban.

The adjustment from head coach to coordinator will be gradual for Kiffin, who hasn’t been in this position since 2007. But being more hands on with players and focusing solely on the offense could be a good thing for him. Taking a step back from everything that goes into being a head coach -- discipline, the media, etc. -- might remind everyone why he was once one of the hottest names in coaching, someone who was thought of as an offensive genius.

His list of priorities at Alabama isn't long. As he said, “The last thing we would want to do is come in here and change a bunch of stuff.” With Amari Cooper, T.J. Yeldon and the other skill players on offense, he doesn’t have to. But he does have to find a way to generate more big plays, and there is the small matter of developing a starting quarterback.

Day 1 of practice saw Blake Sims ahead of Jake Coker, who sailed a number of passes high and wide of his target. Day 2 saw a big improvement from Coker, who Saban said had his best day of camp.

“Lane has done a really good job since he’s been here, providing good leadership for the whole offense,” Saban said. “The direction we want to go, the identity we want to have and emphasizing some of the intangible things -- the fundamentals -- we needed to improve on.”

As Saban put it, “It’s not just about knowledge.” What he sees in Kiffin is an ability to communicate.

“Some people have a tremendous amount of knowledge, but you have to be able to articulate it to the players in a way they can understand it and it’s simple for them to go out and execute it,” Saban said. “Systematically, Lane does that with the players he coaches and with the entire offense, which I think is really, really important.”

Whether it’s fair or not, Kiffin is one of the biggest storylines in college football. If Alabama’s offense does well, he will get the credit. If it fails and Alabama doesn’t live up to its No. 2 ranking, he will receive a disproportionate share of the blame.

But for at least one day -- the only day he had to speak himself -- Kiffin did well. He didn’t make any headlines. He didn’t ruffle any feathers. He played the part of assistant and smiled all the way through it.

Alex Scarborough | email

Alabama/SEC reporter

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