SEC: A.J. Cann

The extended version of SEC media days is behind us, and we've seen the way the media voted in terms of picking the champion and the preseason All-SEC selections.

Alabama was the pick, which given our track record, might not be the best news for the Crimson Tide. As Nick Saban so willingly reminded everybody, it's not like the media has had a crystal ball lately when it comes to picking the SEC champ. Only four times in the last 22 years have the media correctly picked the SEC champion at the SEC's preseason shindig.

Maybe this is the year we start the kind of streak John Wooden would be proud of. Here's a look at the selections from SEC media days this year.

Below is my own ballot, and Edward will unveil his later today after he finishes breaking down tape from all of the World Cup matches (or are they games?).

OFFENSE
QB: Nick Marshall, Auburn
RB: Todd Gurley, Georgia
RB: Mike Davis, South Carolina
WR: Amari Cooper, Alabama
WR: Malcolm Mitchell, Georgia
TE: Hunter Henry, Arkansas
OL: Cedric Ogbuehi, Texas A&M
OL: Laremy Tunsil, Ole Miss
OL: La'el Collins, LSU
OL: A.J. Cann, South Carolina
C: Reese Dismukes, Auburn

DEFENSE
DL: Dante Fowler, Jr., Florida
DL: Chris Jones, Mississippi State
DL: A'Shawn Robinson, Alabama
DL: Robert Nkemdiche, Ole Miss
LB: Benardrick McKinney, Mississippi State
LB: Leonard Floyd, Georgia
LB: Trey DePriest, Alabama
DB: Vernon Hargreaves III, Florida
DB: Taveze Calhoun, Mississippi State
DB: Landon Collins, Alabama
DB: Cody Prewitt, Ole Miss

SPECIALISTS
PK: Marshall Morgan, Georgia
P: Drew Kaser, Texas A&M
RS: Marcus Murphy, Missouri
AP: Christion Jones, Alabama

EAST
1. South Carolina
2. Georgia
3. Florida
4. Tennessee
5. Missouri
6. Vanderbilt
7. Kentucky

WEST
1. Alabama
2. Auburn
3. Mississippi State
4. LSU
5. Ole Miss
6. Texas A&M
7 Arkansas

SEC CHAMPION
Alabama
The opening of SEC media days isn't the only news of the day. Two more college football award watch lists debuted Monday, and the SEC is a major player on both.

Thirteen of the 123 watch list honorees for the Lombardi Award, which is given annually to the top lineman or linebacker, are from the conference. Likewise, nine of the 51 nominees for the Butkus Award, which goes to the top linebacker, are SEC players.

Here are the full lists of SEC nominees:

Lombardi
G A.J. Cann, South Carolina
OT La'el Collins, LSU
C Reese Dismukes, Auburn
DE Trey Flowers, Arkansas
LB Leonard Floyd, Georgia
LB A.J. Johnson, Tennessee
DT Chris Jones, Mississippi State
OG Arie Kouandjio, Alabama
LB Benardrick McKinney, Mississippi State
DT Robert Nkemdiche, Ole Miss
OT Cedric Ogbuehi, Texas A&M
DE A'Shawn Robinson, Alabama
LB Ramik Wilson, Georgia

Butkus
Trey DePriest, Alabama
Leonard Floyd, Georgia
Kris Frost
Jordan Jenkins, Georgia
A.J. Johnson, Tennessee
Benardrick McKinney, Mississippi State
Braylon Mitchell, Arkansas
Reggie Ragland, Alabama
Ramik Wilson, Georgia
Another day, another college football watch list.

The 2014 Bronko Nagurski Trophy watch list debuted Thursday, along with the 2014 Outland Trophy watch list.

The SEC made its presence known again by ranking second out of all the major conferences with 16 players on the Nagurski watch list. The Nagurski Trophy is given out annually to college football's top defensive player.

The SEC led the nation with 19 players on the watch list for the Outland Trophy, which is given annually to the nation's top interior lineman. Eighty-one players make up the watch list for the Nagurski Trophy, and 64 are on the Outland Trophy's watch list.

The SEC players who made each list:

Nagurski
Outland
Earlier today we ranked all 14 teams based on their offensive line. Now it’s time to look at the top tackles, the top guards and the top centers and determine who will stand out above the rest this fall.

[+] EnlargeCedric Ogbuehi
AP Photo/Aaron M. SprecherTexas A&M expects big things from Cedric Ogbuehi, who is expected to move over to left tackle this fall.
1. OT Cedric Ogbuehi, Sr., Texas A&M: The recent string of left tackles in College Station has been nothing short of remarkable. Luke Joeckel and Jake Matthews each were selected in the top 10 of the NFL draft the past two years, and there’s a strong possibility that Ogbuehi will make it 3 for 3. The 6-foot-5, 300-pound senior played right tackle last fall, but he’s expected to move over and replace Matthews at left tackle this season.

2. OT La'el Collins, Sr., LSU: The Tigers had nine players drafted last month, more than any team in college football, but it could’ve easily have been 10 had Collins opted to leave school early. He was projected to go as high as the second round. Instead, he will return for his senior season, try to improve his draft stock and anchor LSU’s offensive line.

3. OT Laremy Tunsil, So., Ole Miss: The Rebels’ 2013 recruiting class was full of five-star prospects, but none played better than Tunsil last season. He appeared in 12 games, making nine starts at left tackle. He allowed just one sack all year. He was a second team All-SEC selection, a member of the SEC All-Freshman team, and the coaches expect him to only get better as a sophomore.

4. C Reese Dismukes, Sr., Auburn: In a league full of standout centers, Dismukes tops the list. He wasn’t the most talented player on Auburn’s offensive line last season, but you can make the argument that he was the most important during the Tigers' run to the BCS title game. He’s started every game in the past three years, and he’s looking to end his career on a high note.

5. OG A.J. Cann, Sr., South Carolina: The 37 career starts made by Dismukes over the past three seasons is impressive, but Cann has him beaten. The South Carolina senior has made 38 straight starts at left guard since taking over as a redshirt freshman in 2011, and after serving as the captain in 2013, he’ll again be counted on for his leadership this fall.

6. C Ryan Kelly, Jr., Alabama: The transition from All-American Barrett Jones to Kelly shouldn't have been a simple one, but the fact that it occurred without a hiccup is a testament to Kelly's ability not just athletically, but intellectually. Injuries, however, caused him to miss four games last season. Now recovered, he has every shot to to win the Rimington Trophy.

7. OT Corey Robinson, Sr., South Carolina: At 6-foot-8 and 348 pounds, it’s hard to miss Robinson when you watch the Gamecocks play. He has the size that makes everybody, NFL scouts included, take notice. The former defensive tackle has found a home at left tackle and will be in charge of protecting Dylan Thompson’s blind side this fall.

8. C Evan Boehm, Jr., Missouri: What can’t Boehm do? As a true freshman, he started 12 games at left guard, earning freshman All-American honors. He moved to center last season and led an offensive line that paved the way for a stellar Tigers rushing attack. The junior could probably play tackle if he wanted, but he’ll stay at center, where he could have a big season.

9. OG Vadal Alexander, OG, LSU: If going against Collins at left tackle weren't intimidating enough, imagine seeing the 6-foot-6, 342-pound Alexander lining up right next to him on every play. The two of them can open a hole big enough for a truck to run through, and it should be plenty big enough for five-star freshman Leonard Fournette.

10. OT Chaz Green, Sr., Florida: The other nine offensive linemen on this list all played last season, but Green is the wild card of the group. He missed the entire season after tearing his labrum during fall camp. He has all the talent -- he started in 10 games in 2012 and was a freshman All-American in 2011 -- but how will he bounce back?

Preseason accolades in the SEC

June, 6, 2014
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The SEC's 14 football sports information directors have offered their prognostications for the 2014 season as part of AL.com's annual SEC spring football report, and there were some interesting choices.

Auburn quarterback Nick Marshall was selected as the league's Most Valuable Player, and Marshall was also picked as the SEC's top Heisman Trophy candidate.

South Carolina offensive guard A.J. Cann was tabbed as the league's most underrated player, and it's tough to argue with that choice.

The best passer in the SEC next season, according to the SID's, will be Missouri's Maty Mauk. Marshall was second.

Also of note, Texas A&M's Jarvis Harrison was picked as the top offensive lineman, which will raise a few eyebrows around the league. One of Harrison's teammates, tackle Cedric Ogbuehi, has been mentioned as a top-5 pick in next year's NFL draft.

Below is the entire rundown:

MOST VALUABLE PLAYER

QB Nick Marshall, Auburn

Next: RB Todd Gurley, Georgia

TOP HEISMAN CANDIDATE

QB Nick Marshall, Auburn

Next: RB Todd Gurley, Georgia

MOST VERSATILE

Christion Jones, Alabama

Next: Malcolm Mitchell, Georgia

MOST UNDERRATED

OL A.J. Cann, South Carolina

Next: QB Dak Prescott, Mississippi State

BEST ATHLETE

QB Nick Marshall, Auburn

Next: WR/KR Christion Jones, Alabama

BEST LEADER

LB Ramik Wilson, Georgia

Next: LB Curt Maggitt, Tennessee

BEST OUTSIDE LINEBACKER

Alvin Dupree, Kentucky

Next: Kwon Alexander, LSU

BEST INSIDE LINEBACKER

Ramik Wilson, Georgia

Next: A.J. Johnson, Tennessee

BEST DEFENSIVE LINEMAN

Dante Fowler, Florida

Next: Trey Flowers, Arkansas

BEST CORNERBACK

Vernon Hargreaves III, Florida

Next: Jalen Mills, LSU

BEST SAFETY

Landon Collins, Alabama

Next: Cody Prewitt, Ole Miss

BEST OFFENSIVE LINEMAN

Jarvis Harrison, Texas A&M

Next: Reese Dismukes, Auburn

BEST RECEIVER

Amari Cooper, Alabama

Next: Sammie Coates, Auburn

BEST RUNNER

Todd Gurley, Georgia

Next: Mike Davis, South Carolina

BEST BLOCKING BACK

Jalston Fowler, Alabama

Next: Mike Davis, South Carolina

BEST PASSER

Maty Mauk, Missouri

Next: Nick Marshall, Auburn

BEST KICK RETURNER

Christion Jones, Alabama

Next: Andre Dubose, Florida

BEST PLACEKICKER

Marshall Morgan, Georgia

Next: Colby Delahoussaye, LSU

BEST PUNTER

Drew Kaser, Texas A&M

Next: Devon Bell, Mississippi State
Now that the NFL draft has come and gone, we thought it was only appropriate to get some of the excitement started for next year's draft. We can say goodbye to the Class of 2014 by ushering in the Class of 2015.

Now, I'm no draft guru or anything like that, but I do know there are a handful of solid, draft-eligible prospects lurking around the SEC. You don't lead the nation in draft picks for eight straight years without having some more guys to churn out in future drafts.

[+] EnlargeTodd Gurley, Ahmad Christian
Dale Zanine/USA TODAY SportsTodd Gurley figures to be prominent among SEC East draft-eligible players in 2015.
With that thought in mind, esteemed colleague Alex Scarborough and I will be looking at 10 players from the SEC Eastern Division and SEC Western Division who we believe will be top prospects for the 2015 NFL draft. I'll go first with the East; Alex will have his 10 West prospects later on Monday.

Let's see what I came up with (in alphabetical order):

  • A.J. Cann, OG, RSr., South Carolina: He has a team-high 38 career starts entering the year and has started all but one game during the last three years. He's one of the top guards around and has been South Carolina's anchor up front for a while now. He's also a tremendous leader and has ideal size to plug holes at left guard.
  • Mike Davis, RB, Jr., South Carolina: One of the toughest runners in the SEC, Davis had a fun coming-out party last year with 1,183 rushing yards and 11 touchdowns. Davis can grind out tough yards and explode for the home-run play. For his career, Davis has seven 100-yard games.
  • Alvin Dupree, DE/LB, Sr., Kentucky: Dupree might be one of the most versatile defenders here. He started his first two years at outside linebacker, proving to be a solid pass-rusher, but moved to defensive end last year and was even better, leading Kentucky with 9.5 tackles for loss and seven sacks. He has ranked in the top 10 of the SEC in sacks the last two years.
  • Leonard Floyd, LB, So., Georgia: Three years removed from his graduating class, Floyd will definitely be eligible for the draft. During his first year, he was Georgia's best pass-rusher, notching a team-best 6.5 sacks. People around the program think he's Georgia's most talented player, and he could really jump up draft boards this fall.
  • Dante Fowler Jr., DE/LB, Jr., Florida: Another versatile defender, Fowler has the ability to push himself into the first round of next year's draft with his combination of power and speed. He has 18.5 career tackles for loss and can play both linebacker and defensive end, which will be very appealing to NFL scouts.
  • Markus Golden, DE, Sr., Missouri: Overshadowed by Michael Sam and Kony Ealy, Golden returns as one of the SEC's best edge players. He was third on his team with 13 tackles for loss and 6.5 sacks last year and could have easily left early for the NFL draft this year.
  • Chaz Green, OT, RSr., Florida: When healthy, Green is Florida's best offensive lineman. Losing him last year really hurt the Gators' offense, and his return is a huge boost. Green has the size and ability that scouts want, but his health is key. If he's healthy this year, he could battle for first-round status.
  • Todd Gurley, RB, Jr., Georgia: Like Jadeveon Clowney, Gurley probably could have left for the NFL after his sophomore season. While he has dealt with nagging injuries in his first two seasons at Georgia, he has 2,734 rushing yards, 27 touchdowns, and 12 100-yard games. He's a bully of a back with a rare combination of size, speed, and elusiveness that make him a first-round pick.
  • Corey Robinson, OT, RSr., South Carolina: NFL scouts are already drooling over his 6-foot-8, 349-pound frame. With 22 career starts under his belt, Robinson has plenty of experience going into his final year and has all the talent and skill to be one of the top tackles in next year's draft.
  • Ramik Wilson, LB, Sr., Georgia: Though he led the SEC with 133 tackles last year, Wilson still has that "underrated" tag attached to his name. He has ideal size and athleticism to hear his name called early in next year's draft, and his field instincts are exceptional.

COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Already a Hall of Fame lock when he returned to the college coaching ranks nearly a decade ago, Steve Spurrier has found his second wind at South Carolina.

He’s also found a home.

The Head Ball Coach will always be a Florida Gator, and he’ll proudly tell you as much in his familiar, high-pitched twang. But South Carolina has grown on him in more ways than one.

So much so that he and his wife, Jerri, plan on staying in the Columbia area even when he’s done coaching.

“People always ask where I’m going to live when my coaching days are over,” said Spurrier, who owns a vacation home in Crescent Beach, Fla. “Usually, your last stop is where you end up, if your last stop is successful. Bobby Stoops wants to be in Norman.

[+] EnlargeSteve Spurrier
AP Photo/John RaouxIt's been mostly thumbs-up for Steve Spurrier at South Carolina, as "The Old Ball Coach" has led the Gamecocks to three straight top-10 finishes.
“Our plan is to live here, at least between here and Crescent Beach. Every time I go through Gainesville, I don’t know anybody anymore. I’ve got a few pals there, but not that many. This is a good place to live. It really is.”

And for the record, Spurrier plans on resigning and not retiring. In his mind, there’s a big difference.

“I like resign a lot better,” Spurrier said. “Retiring sounds too much like you’re going to sit around and not do a whole lot. I’m not a sit-around kind of guy.”

Now, for those South Carolina fans who get sweaty palms when Spurrier even broaches the subject of his retirement (oops, his resignation), relax.

He’s having way too much fun -- and success -- to even think about walking away right now, and he feels and looks a lot closer to 49 than his actual age of 69. He misses a day of working out about as often as he concedes a 3-foot putt, which is never.

A devout family guy, Spurrier’s two sons, Steve Jr., and Scott, are both working under him on the South Carolina coaching staff, and the Gamecocks are enjoying the kind of unprecedented run that few others in college football have been able to rival the past three years.

But even with three straight top-10 finishes, three straight 11-win seasons, five straight wins over rival Clemson and the longest current home winning streak in the country, don’t tell Spurrier he’s exceeded expectations.

“No, we’ll exceed them when we win the SEC,” Spurrier said. “That’s still the goal, to push for that. We’ve made some really good progress, on the field and financially. When I got here, we’d had one person to give a million dollars to athletics, and her name is on the stadium, Mrs. [Martha] Williams-Brice, and that was in 1972.

“Since then, we’ve found 10 or 11 wealthy people who’ve given over a million dollars. We were way behind financially to most of the schools in the SEC and are still trying to catch up. But we’ve been able to get the facilities upgraded, and once we did that, we were able to sign our top in-state kids. That’s been huge.”

Spurrier’s renowned feel for calling a game and exploiting opposing defenses’ weaknesses ranks up there with any coach who’s ever roamed the sideline in the SEC, or any conference, for that matter.

But it’s his unwavering confidence and presence that have permeated the South Carolina program and been the difference in a ton of close wins over the years. The Gamecocks are 11-3 the past three seasons in games decided by a touchdown or less.

“People are always going to love him here because he’s changed the culture, but he’s not satisfied,” South Carolina quarterback Dylan Thompson said. “That says something about him and where this program is right now.

“We’re always pushing to take it to new heights.”

In some ways, Spurrier is about as old-school as it gets. Both his wife and longtime football operations director, Jamie Speronis, aren’t sure how many times Spurrier has turned on a computer by himself. If he wants to read something on the Internet, Speronis is generally the one who prints it out for him.

In the corner of Spurrier’s office, he has a stack of old play-by-play sheets from games going back who knows how many years, and he can get to the one he wants in a matter of seconds.

Even though he owns an iPhone, nobody is really sure if he knows how to use it. He’s still rocking the old flip phone.

So while technology might not be Spurrier’s thing, don’t think for a minute that he has any trouble relating to today’s athlete. His wit is as sharp as ever, and nobody is spared.

“As an offensive lineman, you probably don’t want him saying much of anything to you,” senior guard A.J. Cann quipped. “I try to stay on his good side. He might be pushing 70, but he’s still coaching as hard as he ever has, and man, does he know how to push your buttons.”

Thompson added: “I love playing for him. He has his way of doing it and isn’t going to stop until you do it that way. When you get there, he’ll be happy. But until then, he’s going to keep grinding on you.”

And doing so in vintage Spurrier fashion.

[+] EnlargeSteve Spurrier, Connor Shaw
Jeff Blake/USA TODAY SportsDespite being 69 years old, Steve Spurrier is still coaching as hard as ever.
Toward the end of spring practice this year, sophomore receiver Pharoh Cooper looked back too early on a pass route, prompting Spurrier, the son of a Presbyterian minister, to pipe up, ‘Pharoh, you know what happens when you look back?’ ”

In the Book of Genesis in the Bible, Lot’s wife looked back on Sodom and became a pillar of salt.

“He does a really good job of relating to whoever you are,” Thompson said. “I’m a Christian, and any time he can relate a Bible story to something we’re doing, he’ll do it. He’ll call Kane Whitehurst ‘Abel’ sometimes, off-the-wall stuff, and you think he’s crazy.

“But you always listen.”

For some SEC purists, it’s hard to fathom that Spurrier is just three seasons away from equaling the 12 seasons he spent as Florida’s head coach.

He’s not sure he’s ever had more fun coaching than he has these past few years, especially given the fact that South Carolina has accomplished so many firsts on his watch. As part of his new contract, Spurrier has the option to stay on as a special adviser to the president and athletic director when he does hang up his coaching visor for good.

But as Spurrier himself says, he can’t imagine not coaching football.

“What else are you going to do?” he said. “Every time I go to the beach now, after about three days, I say, ‘Jerri, let’s go.’ I’m not going to play golf every day. I’ve got my enthusiasm up, too. I got two epidural shots in my back [recently] and am feeling pretty good. I still have some arthritis, but it doesn’t hurt to work out.

“We’ve got a lot to look forward to here and a lot more we want to do.”

Plus, it’s home.
Maybe it's a surprise to some, and maybe it shouldn't be. Either way, Texas A&M's offensive line will be the cream of the crop in the SEC in 2014, according to the fans.

More than 17,000 people voted in our SportsNation poll last week, and the Aggies were a clear winner. They received 34 percent of the vote. LSU was second with 23 percent and then Auburn with 16 percent, Alabama with 14 percent and South Carolina with 13 percent.

The Aggies will have a bit of a new look up front offensively in 2014. Senior Cedric Ogbuehi is moving from right tackle to left tackle and is another in a long line of outstanding tackles to play at Texas A&M. Luke Joeckel was the second overall pick in the 2013 NFL draft. Jake Matthews is being projected as a top-10 pick in May's draft, and Ogbuehi also has the makings of a first-rounder when the 2015 draft rolls around. He got a first-round grade from the advisory board this past year but decided to return for his senior season.

Ogbuehi is one of four returning starters up front for the Aggies, who should also have more depth next season. Senior left guard Jarvis Harrison was out all spring with a shoulder injury, and senior Garrett Gramling worked with the first team. He played well enough that he could work his way into the starting lineup. Every good offensive line is stout right up the middle, and junior Mike Matthews returns as one of the top centers in the league. He has excellent command of the offense in terms of all his checks and calls.

The right tackle job is the big question, although sophomore Germain Ifedi worked there this spring after playing last season at guard. The 6-5, 330-pound Ifedi is a mammoth individual, but seems to move well enough to play outside at tackle. Junior college tackles Avery Gennesy and Jermaine Eluemunor will benefit from having gone through the spring, and junior Joseph Cheek got a lot of first-team work at guard this spring.

The big surprise coming out of the SportsNation poll was that South Carolina received the fewest votes. The Gamecocks also return four starters and have three players -- tackles Corey Robinson and Brandon Shell and left guard A.J. Cann -- who are likely to be drafted. This also will be their third season playing together. When it's all said and done, here's betting that the Gamecocks are as good as anybody up front offensively in 2014.

We'll see how it all plays out in the fall.
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- South Carolina’s Mike Davis just concluded a quiet spring.

But come fall, in his words, it’s on.

“I’m going to run angry next season, and everybody’s going to know about it,” said Davis, who received only minimal contact this spring after rushing for 1,183 yards a year ago in his first season as the Gamecocks’ starting running back.

A second-team All-SEC selection as a sophomore, Davis was one of the breakthrough players of the year in the league. He averaged 5.8 yards per carry and rushed for 100 yards in seven of his first nine games.

But when November arrived, Davis was running on fumes. He injured his shoulder and ribs against Mississippi State, but it was a bum right ankle that he couldn’t shake.

[+] EnlargeMike Davis
AP Photo/John RaouxThe grind of the SEC schedule got to South Carolina running back Mike Davis in 2013.
“Every game, it felt like people started falling on it just because,” Davis lamented.

Davis finished with 203 carries. The only two backs in the SEC (playing in 12 or fewer games) who carried it more were Tennessee’s Rajion Neal (215) and Alabama’s T.J. Yeldon (207). By the time Davis got to Florida, Clemson and Wisconsin, all three with stout run defenses, he didn’t look like the same player.

He was still running as hard, but the wear and tear from the season had obviously taken a huge toll.

“I was hurting, but I was still playing,” Davis said. “That’s the time of year a lot of guys are hurting. But you keep going. You’re playing for the guys around you.”

Some of the best news for Davis is that he will have more guys around him at running back in 2014. He won’t have to carry it as much during the early part of the season, meaning he should be fresh for the stretch drive.

Junior Brandon Wilds is healthy again, and the Gamecocks also like junior Shon Carson’s versatility. One of the most physically impressive backs on campus is redshirt freshman David Williams, who has explosive speed.

“When one person is beat up, another can come in and our offense is still going to run the same,” Davis said. “We will be the same offense. We have four guys who can play for anybody.

“Brandon Wilds has done a great job. Shon Carson is killing it this offseason, and David Williams is a freak athlete. He has everything you want in a running back -- size and power -- and his speed will wow you with how big he is.”

The centerpiece of that deep running back stable, though, will remain the same -- No. 28.

And despite his 1,000-yard season last season, Davis still carries a big chip on his shoulder. It goes back to his recruitment.

The Lithonia, Ga., native was committed to Florida for several months, but he soured on the Gators when he found out they were also trying to recruit Keith Marshall late in the process.

“I talked to Keith Marshall, and he told me they sent the whole coaching staff to his house, and they told me that they didn’t,” said Davis, whose other brother, James Davis, played at Clemson.

“I knew Florida was going to take two running backs, and I knew Matt Jones wasn’t going to change his mind. I had asked if they were recruiting other running backs beside us, and they told me no. But when I found out they sent all their coaches to [Marshall’s] house for an in-home visit and only the tight ends coach to my house, I felt very disrespected.”

Davis decommitted from Florida soon after and told South Carolina defensive coordinator Lorenzo Ward privately that he would sign with the Gamecocks. Ward had stuck with Davis through the whole recruiting process and they shared a strong bond.

We will be the same offense. We have four guys who can play for anybody.

-- South Carolina running back Mike Davis, on the running backs who will be his backups in 2014
Of course, that didn’t mean the recruiting drama was completely over.

“Georgia came -- all the teams did toward the end -- but it was too late,” Davis said. “I looked at it like, ‘I’m in Georgia. I’m one of the top running backs. How come I’m just getting an offer from UGA?’ With, Clemson, my brother went there. So I was like, ‘Why are you just now hopping on?’

“They were all too late to the game. I think they looked at me as a backup plan, that they’d go recruit other guys and if they didn’t get them, they’d go get me. That’s how I looked at it.

“But I’m nobody’s backup plan.”

Davis bulked up to more than 220 pounds this spring but wants to play at around 215. He said he was between 205 and 210 last season.

“You’re going to see a totally different person. I’m not going to lie,” Davis said. “I did a lot to help myself and better myself this offseason, trying to stay healthy. I’m as healthy as I’ve ever been, and being around our guys has helped me be a better teammate.”

Davis will be running behind one of the better offensive lines in the SEC. The Gamecocks return four starters, and senior guard A.J. Cann said blocking for a guy like Davis makes their jobs easier.

“That first hit, he’s not coming down,” Cann said. “Unless you clip him by his ankles, he might fall. But if you go at him up high, I don’t think he’s coming down. He runs angry, and he runs mean.”

The meanest version may be yet to come, although Davis will measure himself by how many games the Gamecocks win next season, and more specifically, whether they can break through and win a first SEC championship.

“If you want to be great, then you’re going to do whatever it takes to help your team win,” Davis said. “It’s not about wowing people, but you do want them to come away saying, ‘Why is he running so hard? He has that extra oomph.’

“That’s how I want to run on every carry.”

SEC's next wave of star players

March, 18, 2014
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For the most part, we have an idea who the top returning players are in the SEC for next season.

There are 11 players back who earned first- or second-team All-SEC honors last season from the coaches, including six first-team selections: Auburn center Reese Dismukes, Alabama running back T.J. Yeldon, Georgia linebacker Ramik Wilson, Tennessee linebacker A.J. Johnson, Florida cornerback Vernon Hargreaves III and Ole Miss safety Cody Prewitt. The second-team selections returning are Mississippi State tight end Malcolm Johnson, LSU offensive tackle La'el Collins, South Carolina running back Mike Davis, Arkansas defensive end Trey Flowers and Georgia linebacker Jordan Jenkins.

Picking the next wave of All-SEC players can be tricky, and it's certainly not a given that all these players returning will be repeat selections.

So what we've done is go through and pick the 10 players most likely to emerge as All-SEC players next season, and the caveat is that they can't have previously earned postseason all-conference honors from either the coaches or Associated Press (first or second team). That rules out a few other players not listed above such as Georgia running back Todd Gurley, Missouri receiver Dorial Green-Beckham, Ole Miss offensive tackle Laremy Tunsil, Florida defensive end Dante Fowler Jr., Kentucky defensive end Alvin "Bud" Dupree and Alabama safety Landon Collins.

Here's our next wave of SEC stars, listed alphabetically:

[+] EnlargeChris Jones
John Korduner / Icon SMIChris Jones showed his big-play potential as a freshman at Mississippi State.
Caleb Azubike, OLB, Vanderbilt, Jr.: Look out for the 6-foot-4, 260-pound Azubike coming off the edge in Derek Mason's new 3-4 defense. Azubike tied for the team lead last season with 9.5 tackles for loss.

A.J. Cann, OG, South Carolina, Sr.: The anchor of what should be the best offensive line in the SEC, Cann enters the 2014 season as perhaps the top guard in the league.

Derrick Henry, RB, Alabama, So.: Just go back and turn on the tape from the Sugar Bowl. Henry is going to be a beast and is in great shape after what's been a terrific offseason for him thus far.

Chris Jones, DE, Mississippi State, So.: The league is full of good, young defensive linemen, and the 6-5, 300-pound Jones is right there near the top. He's a force at both tackle and end.

Carl Lawson, DE, Auburn, So.: The Tigers will miss Dee Ford and his pressure off the edge, but the 6-2, 261-pound Lawson is the next star in the making on the Plains.

Curt Maggitt, OLB, Tennessee, Jr.: You might have forgotten about Maggitt after he missed last season because of injuries, but he's healthy again and will be used in several different roles for the Vols.

Malcolm Mitchell, WR, Georgia, Jr.: Injuries are the only thing that have kept Mitchell from being one of the top playmakers in this league. If he can stay healthy, he'll put up huge numbers in 2014.

Robert Nkemdiche, DT, Ole Miss, So.: The top high school player in the country a year ago, Nkemdiche will move inside and has the size, power and athleticism to be dominant.

Cedric Ogbuehi, OT, Texas A&M, Sr.: He started his career at guard, moved to right tackle last season and is now in line to be the Aggies' third straight star left tackle as he takes over for Jake Matthews.

A'Shawn Robinson, DE, Alabama, So.: The team leader with 5.5 sacks last season as a freshman, Robinson has a chance to be the best defensive lineman the Tide have produced under Nick Saban.

A few others to watch:

Top of the line in the SEC

February, 20, 2014
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Granted, spring practice hasn't even started yet, but we here at the SEC blog want to give a little love to the "big uglies" in the offensive line. Go back and look at the last few SEC champions/national champions, and it's no coincidence that those teams were outstanding on the offensive line.

Who will be the top five offensive linemen in the league next season?

That's a tricky question because a lot can change between now and next fall, and offensive linemen all develop at different rates. For instance, did anybody have Auburn's Greg Robinson as the SEC's premier offensive lineman this time a year ago? Robinson exploded during the 2013 season and is now being projected by ESPN's Mel Kiper as the No. 2 overall selection in the 2014 NFL draft.

There's sure to be a player or two just like Robinson that really emerges next season. With that said, here's our early take on the SEC's top-5 offensive linemen going into the 2014 season. They're listed alphabetically:

[+] EnlargeLa'el Collins
Kim Klement/USA TODAY SportsLa'el Collins has the potential to become one of the nation's most dominant left tackles.
A.J. Cann, OG, South Carolina, Sr.: The heart and soul of a South Carolina offensive line that should be one of the best in the league next season, the 6-4, 314-pound Cann already has 38 career starts to his credit. He's a force at left guard and teams with tackle Corey Robinson, giving the Gamecocks an imposing left side of the line.

La'el Collins, OT, LSU, Sr.: The Tigers breathed a sigh of relief, and with good reason, when the 6-5, 315-pound Collins decided to return for his senior season. He has everything it takes to be one of the most dominant left tackles in the college game. He was a second-team All-SEC selection last season by the coaches and started his LSU career at guard.

Reese Dismukes, C, Auburn, Sr.: A starter for the Tigers since the day he walked onto campus, the 6-3, 297-pound Dismukes is the class of a deep and talented center crop in the SEC next season. He's tough, smart and has the kind of nasty streak coaches love. Dismukes was a first-team All-SEC selection by the coaches last season and a big reason the Tigers led the country in rushing with an average of 328.3 yards per game.

Cedric Ogbuehi, OT, Texas A&M, Sr.: When you start listing the top offensive tackles in college football, don't forget about Ogbuehi. He'll be moving from right tackle to left tackle to replace Jake Matthews and has already proven that he's a top run-blocker and pass-protector at both guard and tackle. The 6-5, 300-pound Ogbuehi is an exceptional athlete and came back for his senior season despite receiving a first round grade from the NFL draft advisory board.

Laremy Tunsil, OT, Ole Miss, So.: Even though the 6-5, 315-pound Tunsil is the youngest of this group, he might have the most pure talent. He took over the Rebels' left tackle duties last season as a true freshman and started nine games, earning second-team All-SEC honors from the AP as well as freshman All-America honors. He allowed just one sack all year from his position, and with an entire offseason and spring workouts under his belt, he should take an even bigger step in 2014.

Five more to watch:

Our All-SEC second team choices

December, 17, 2013
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On Monday, we gave you guys our All-SEC first team. Today, we thought we'd unveil our second team for 2013. There are so many guys in this league who deserve recognition that we just wouldn't feel good about not having another team to give props to during the holiday season:

OFFENSE

QB: AJ McCarron, Alabama
RB: Jeremy Hill, LSU
RB: Mike Davis, South Carolina
WR: Jarvis Landry, LSU
WR: Dorial Green-Beckham, Missouri
TE: Hunter Henry, Arkansas
OL: Wesley Johnson, Vanderbilt
OL: Justin Britt, Missouri
OL: A.J. Cann, South Carolina
OL: La'el Collins, LSU
C: Reese Dismukes, Auburn
AP: Todd Gurley, Georgia

DEFENSE

DL: Kony Ealy, Missouri
DL: Chris Smith, Arkansas
DL: Ego Ferguson, LSU
DL: Markus Golden, Missouri
LB: A.J. Johnson, Tennessee
LB: Avery Williamson, Kentucky
LB: Jordan Jenkins, Georgia
DB: Vernon Hargreaves III, Florida
DB: Andre Hal, Vanderbilt
DB: Chris Davis, Auburn
DB: Taveze Calhoun, Mississippi State

SPECIAL TEAMS

PK: Colby Delahoussaye, LSU
P: Drew Kaser, Texas A&M
PR: Christion Jones, Alabama
KR: Christion Jones, Alabama

SEC players of the week

September, 30, 2013
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Here are the SEC players of the week, as announced by the league Monday:

OFFENSIVE: Aaron Murray, QB, Georgia
  • Murray was named the Walter Camp National Offensive Player of the Week following his performance in a 44-41 victory over No. 6 LSU.
  • He connected on 20 of 34 for 298 yards and four touchdowns and also ran for his third touchdown of the season. This marked Murray’s second victory over an SEC top-10 team in the last three games as he helped generate 494 yards of offense.
  • Under Murray’s direction, the Bulldogs have scored at least 35 points in all four of their games this season, including at least 41 vs. both South Carolina and LSU.
  • Murray moved into the No. 2 spot in school history in career passing yardage with 11,429 (former Bulldog David Greene holds the school and SEC records at 11,528); in total offense, Murray now has 11,659 yards, which is No. 2 in SEC history.
DEFENSIVE: C.J. Mosley, LB, Alabama
  • Led the team with nine total tackles, one tackle for loss, one pass breakup and two QB hurries.
  • Put the game out of reach when he made a tackle for a safety with 5:43 left in the game to make it 18-0. Also deflected a pass on a key fourth-and-2 from the Alabama 7-yard line in the third quarter to keep the 16-0 lead.
SPECIAL TEAMS: Marshall Morgan, PK, Georgia
  • Morgan scored 14 points during the 44-41 victory over LSU.
  • He was 5-for-5 on PATs and drilled all three of his field goal attempts, including a career-long 55 yarder that put Georgia ahead 27-20 in the third quarter.
FRESHMAN: Vernon Hargreaves III, CB, Florida
  • Made his third interception of the season, the most by an SEC freshman and the third-most nationally among freshmen.
  • Intercepted a pass in the end zone from Kentucky’s Maxwell Smith.
  • Leads the Gators in interceptions.
DEFENSIVE LINE: Michael Sam, DE, Missouri
  • Was disruptive for most of the night in Mizzou's win over Arkansas State, as he had a career-best three sacks (for 19 yards of loss) and forced a fumble. He ended the game with four tackles.
  • The three sacks ties the NCAA single-game high this season, and Sam leads the SEC and ranks 18th nationally with his tackles-for-loss average of 1.5 per game.
OFFENSIVE LINE: A.J. Cann, OG, South Carolina
  • Cann led the charge for a Gamecocks' offensive line that helped amass 225 yards on the ground, including 167 from Mike Davis, and four rushing touchdowns. South Carolina added 265 passing yards.
  • Played all 80 offensive snaps, grading out at 86 percent with no sacks or pressures against him.
Two more preseason watch lists are out, and both are very SEC heavy.

The conference led all others by putting 16 on the Bronco Nagurski and 15 on the Outland Trophy watch lists. The Nagurski Trophy is given annually to the national defensive player of the year, while the Outland Trophy is given annually to college football's best interior lineman.

Here are the 16 who made the Nagurski list:
Here are the 16 who made the Outland list:
Anybody ever heard that you win up front in the SEC? Here’s how we rank the offensive lines in the league heading into the 2013 season.

 Ja'Wuan James/Antonio Richardson
Icon SMIJa'Wuan James and Antonio Richardson make for formidable bookends to Tennessee's offensive line.
1. Tennessee: The Vols might have lost most of their offensive firepower at the skill positions from a year ago, but they return some serious muscle in the trenches. The tackle tandem of Antonio “Tiny” Richardson and Ja’Wuan James is one of the best in the country. Senior guard Zach Fulton ranks among the best interior linemen in the SEC, and senior center James Stone is on the preseason watch list for the Rimington Award. The Vols enter the 2013 season with 123 combined starts in the offensive line and are as talented as they are experienced.

2. Alabama: Yes, the Crimson Tide lost three players to the NFL draft, but don’t feel sorry for them. Junior Cyrus Kouandjio might be the best left tackle in college football. Senior right guard Anthony Steen is one of the SEC’s more underrated offensive linemen, and sophomore center Ryan Kelly could be the next star center in the league. The battle for the right tackle job will be interesting, and Mario Cristobal is in his first season as the Tide’s offensive line coach. But when’s the last time these guys haven’t been lights out up front?

3. Texas A&M: One of the biggest recruiting scores for the Aggies this offseason was Jake Matthews bypassing the NFL draft and returning for his senior season. He’ll shift from right tackle to left tackle and take over for the departed Luke Joeckel, who was the No. 2 overall pick in the draft. Junior Cedric Ogbuehi will move from guard to right tackle and is receiving some preseason All-SEC mention. Junior Jarvis Harrison returns at left guard, and another member of the Matthews family -- sophomore Mike Matthews -- will take over for Patrick Lewis at center.

4. Georgia: Not only do the Bulldogs return all five starters, but they return their top eight offensive linemen from a year ago. Senior guard Chris Burnette is the anchor of the group, but there’s enough depth that offensive line coach Will Friend could have some options. Right tackle John Theus was a Freshman All-American last season, but was listed No. 2 on the post-spring depth chart behind sophomore Xzavier Ward. Senior Kenarious Gates can play guard or tackle. Junior David Andrews is back at center, and senior Dallas Lee has started each of the past two seasons at guard.

5. South Carolina: Steve Spurrier is hard to please, but this offensive line has a chance to be the best one the Gamecocks have had since he arrived in 2005. One of the keys will be how well redshirt freshman Cody Waldrop fills the shoes of T.J. Johnson at center. Junior left guard A.J. Cann is All-SEC material, and sophomore right tackle Brandon Shell has matured and is poised for a big season. Some of the best news for the Gamecocks was that offensive line coach Shawn Elliott decided to stick around after being wooed by Alabama.

6. LSU: The Tigers were forced to shuffle people around up front last season after tackle Chris Faulk went down with an injury, and the lack of continuity showed in pass protection. They appear to be set going into this season. Junior La’el Collins is moving from guard to left tackle and has star potential. Vadal Alexander returns at right tackle, and senior Josh Williford and sophomore Trai Turner are back at the guard spots. True freshman Ethan Pocic had an impressive spring after enrolling early and will push for playing time at center.

7. Florida: The problem a year ago was pass protection, but the Gators are banking on D.J. Humphries making a big difference at left tackle. The entire left side should be better with the addition of Maryland transfer Max Garcia at guard. Another transfer, Tyler Moore, will step in at right tackle after starting as a true freshman at Nebraska. Senior center Jonotthan Harrison and senior right guard Jon Halapio have combined for 60 career starts. This should be the best offensive line the Gators have put on the field under Will Muschamp.

8. Mississippi State: Four of the Bulldogs’ five starters return. Guard Tobias Smith is also eligible to return after being granted a sixth year of eligibility by the NCAA, but given the state of his aching knees, he’s likely to take on the role of a student coach. Senior guard Gabe Jackson is one of the best interior linemen in the country, and junior Dillon Day is a menacing blocker at center. Justin Malone filled in when Smith was unable to go last season and is the likely starter at right guard. The Bulldogs allowed just 19 sacks in 13 games last season.

9. Ole Miss: Any time an offense puts up the kinds of numbers the Rebels did last season, that means somebody’s doing something right in the offensive line. Four of the five starters are back from a year ago, including 11 lettermen in the offensive line. Junior left guard Aaron Morris was sidelined this spring after undergoing shoulder surgery, but has All-SEC potential. Both starting tackles, Pierce Burton and Emmanuel McCray, are back, although they will be pushed by incoming freshman Laremy Tunsil, who was ranked by ESPN as the No. 1 offensive tackle prospect in the country.

10. Vanderbilt: The Commodores were able to redshirt all of their freshmen on the offensive line last year and head into the 2013 season with the most depth they’ve had up front in some time. There’s no substitute for having a player as versatile as senior Wesley Johnson, who returns at left tackle. Vanderbilt welcomes back six linemen with starting experience, and Andrew Jelks is one of several redshirt freshmen who could step in and play right away.

11. Auburn: The Tigers return four of their five starters from a year ago and several others who played. And while there wasn’t much to like about anything Auburn did on offense last season, this is a group that has a chance to make significant improvement in Gus Malzahn’s hurry-up offense. Center Reese Dismukes is entering his third season as a starter, and sophomore left tackle Greg Robinson is probably the most talented of the bunch.

12. Arkansas: Go back and look at some of Bret Bielema’s rugged offensive lines at Wisconsin. Moreover, new offensive line coach Sam Pittman has a pretty impressive track record of his own. They inherit an Arkansas offensive line in transition. It’s a unit that will be anchored by senior center Travis Swanson, who’s shown up on some preseason All-America teams. Brey Cook and Mitch Smothers have moved inside to guard, and the Hogs like the extra punch they provided in the spring.

13. Missouri: Injuries decimated the Tigers up front a year ago. But with so many different players stepping in and having to play, Missouri should be better equipped to handle any adversity that comes its way this season. It’s always nice to be strong in the middle, and sophomore Evan Boehm will move to center after starting all 12 games at left guard last season as a true freshman. The Tigers need senior left tackle Justin Britt to stay healthy. He tore his ACL last season.

14. Kentucky: The Wildcats want to play at a faster pace under new offensive coordinator Neal Brown, so there will be a natural transition. Replacing All-SEC guard Larry Warford won’t be easy, and there’s very little proven depth. Junior left tackle Darrian Miller will be the anchor of the group, and Zach West and Kevin Mitchell are also back after starting last season. But once the Wildcats get past their first four, they’ll have to lean heavily on redshirt freshmen and true freshmen.

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