Records shattered in NBA All-Star Game

February, 17, 2014
Feb 17
12:24
AM ET
Nathaniel S. Butler/Getty ImagesKyrie Irving was named NBA All-Star Game MVP.
If you like offense, dunks and 3-pointers, and you hate defense, then you loved the 2014 NBA All-Star Game.

This year's version of the All-Star Game set offensive record upon record. Most notably, the teams combined for 318 points, shattering the previous record of 303 set in 1987.

The Eastern Conference won the game, snapping a three-game losing streak for the Western Conference. A win for the West would've been the first four-game win streak in All-Star Game history.

The East overcame an 18-point deficit, ending the game on a 10-0 run.

The East scored 163 points, setting a new record for most points in an All-Star Game. The previous record was 155 by the West in 2003, a game that went to two overtimes. The West tied the previous record with 155 points, despite the loss.

Kyrie Irving won the All-Star Game MVP award, joining LeBron James (twice) as the only Cleveland Cavaliers players to win that honor. Irving finished with 31 points on 14-of-17 shooting and 14 assists. He was 11-for-11 inside the 3-point arc.

Kevin Durant and Blake Griffin each scored a game-high 38 points, tying Rick Barry for the third-most points in an All-Star Game. Wilt Chamberlain scored 42 in 1962 and Michael Jordan scored 40 in 1988.

Griffin set the record for most field goals in an All-Star Game with 19. The previous record was 17 by Wilt Chamberlain in 1962, Michael Jordan in 1988 and Kevin Garnett in 2003. Ten of Griffin's 19 field goals were dunks.

The game was full of 3-point attempts. The teams combined for 100 3-point attempts, destroying the previous record of 71 set last year. The West set a single-team record for 3-point attempts with 56, easily besting the previous record of 39 by the East last year. The West set a new record for most 3-pointers made with 16.

The 3-point barrage was led by Carmelo Anthony, whose eight 3-pointers broke the previous record of six by Mark Price in 1993 and LeBron James in 2012.


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