Stats & Info: Carlos Peguero


Stephen Dunn/Getty ImagesMatt Kemp is the fifth player in history to hit at least 12 home runs before May 1.


ESPN's Home Run Tracker analyzes video of each home run hit this season and as far back as 2006. Each month, the tracker will detail the best and worst home runs, as well as some other interesting statistics pertaining to the long ball. Below are the notable home runs for the month of April.

Power Surge: (Player with highest combined HR distance)
2011 Winner: Jose Bautista
March/April Winner: Matt Kemp
Kemp is off to a torrid start, with 12 home runs that have traveled a true distance of 4,802 feet. That’s a longer true distances than the Padres, who have hit 11 home runs, and the Cubs, who have hit the fewest HR (9) entering May. Kemp's 12 home runs are two shy of the record set by Albert Pujols in 2006 and Alex Rodriguez in 2007 for the most home runs by April 30.

No Doubter (Longest true distance)
2011 Winner: Prince Fielder (486 feet)
March/April Winner: Travis Hafner (481 feet)
On April 15, Cleveland’s DH hit a home run of the Royals Luis Mendoza, the longest HR of his career. Hafner’s previous long was 454 feet in 2006. The 481-foot shot is the longest HR by an Indian since the beginning of our database (2006).

Wall-Scraper (Shortest true distance)
2011 Winner: Asdrubal Cabrera (320 feet)
March/April Winner: B.J. Upton (323 feet)
On April 24, Upton hit a home run off Ervin Santana that hit off the left-field foul pole. Chris Iannetta hit a 324-foot HR off Phil Hughes, the only other player this season to hit a home run less than 345 feet.

Moonshot: (Highest Apex - maximum vertical height a ball reaches)
2011 Winner: Mark Reynolds (161 feet)
March/April Winner: Todd Helton (162 feet)
On April 14, Helton hit a walk-off home run off J.J. Putz. The ball hung in the air for 6.92 seconds, the highest apex HR since Alex Rodriguez reached 169 feet on Sept 11, 2009.

Liner: (Lowest Apex)
2011 Winner: Carlos Peguero (39 feet, twice)
March/April Winners: Curtis Granderson/Luke Scott (49 feet)
Ervin Santana, who gave up the shortest HR of the month, also gave up the lowest apex. On April 13, Santana served up a 349-foot solo shot to Granderson that had an apex of 49 feet. Scott matched Granderson with a 387-foot laser off Mark Lowe, which also never got higher than 49 feet off the ground.

Mother Nature: (Most climate-impacted HR)
2011 Winner: Luke Scott
March/April Winner: Miguel Cabrera
Even the best need help from time to time. On April 26, Cabrera hit a 382-foot home run off Hector Noesi, but a 15 mph wind gust helped the ball carry an extra 62 feet. Without the wind, it would have been a routine fly out.

Server: (Pitcher who allowed the greatest cumulative distance)
2011 Winner: Bronson Arroyo
March/April Winner: Ervin Santana
In addition to giving up the shortest and the lowest apex home runs, Santana’s 10 home runs allowed traveled a total distance of 3,844 feet.

Launching Pad: (Greatest cumulative distance in one stadium)
2011 Winner: Rangers Ballpark in Arlington
March/April Winner: Rogers Centre
Thirty-eight HR have been hit in Rogers Centre thus far, with a total distance of 15,072 feet. Chase Field in Arizona finished second, totaling 12,803 feet. Conversely, only six HR were hit at AT&T Park in April.
Curtis Granderson is well on his way to a career high in home runs this season. And, according to ESPN’s Home Run Tracker, Granderson also hit the highest round-tripper in the month of June.

Mitch Moreland
Moreland
No Doubter: Longest true distance (Mitch Moreland, Texas Rangers)
Moreland’s June 20 blast off the Astros’ Mark Melancon traveled 472 feet. That matched the distance of last month’s winner, Mark Trumbo. Among players with at least 10 home runs hit this season, Moreland is second in average distance per HR (422.3 feet).

Wall-Scraper: Shortest true distance (Adam Lind, Toronto Blue Jays)
On June 16, Lind’s HR off Kevin Gregg went 333 feet. Believe it or not, this is not even Lind’s shortest home run of the season. On May 1, Lind hit one that went 330 feet off Ivan Nova.

Moonshot: Highest apex (Curtis Granderson, New York Yankees)
On June 9, Granderson took Josh Beckett deep at Yankee Stadium. The first-inning shot traveled just 364 feet, but was hit 147 feet in the air. It took 6.35 seconds to leave the yard, and rode an 8 mph gust of wind out of the park.

Line Drive: Lowest apex (Carlos Peguero, Seattle Mariners)
Like Yogi Berra once said, “this is like deja vu all over again.” Peguero’s June 25 line drive off Chris Volstad went 344 feet, 1 foot shorter than his award-winning shot in May off Scott Baker. June’s award-winner registered an apex of 39 feet, and left the ballpark in 2.96 seconds.

Michael Morse
Morse
Fast-Ball: HR with fastest speed off bat: (Michael Morse, Washington Nationals)
On June 5, Morse took Joe Paterson very deep at Chase Field -- a true distance of 454 feet that registered 117 mph off the bat. All of Morse’s home runs this season have measured in the triple digits for speed off the bat, averaging 106.78 mph.

Mother Nature: HR impacted greatest by climate (Brent Lillibridge, Chicago White Sox)
His June 1 HR off Tim Wakefield was aided by a 22 mph wind gust, carrying the ball an extra 55 feet. Without that gust, Lillibridge’s home run -- which registered a speed off the bat of just 91.7 MPH (which was the third slowest this season) -- would have been a lazy fly ball, traveling 315 feet.

Player Power Surge: Greatest Combined Distance (Carlos Pena)
Pena totaled 4,054 feet of home runs in June, besting Prince Fielder by 27 feet and Paul Konerko by 85 feet. All three players tallied 10 home runs, but Pena managed to hit 6 of his 10 over 409 feet.

Brian Matusz
Matusz
Server: Pitcher Who Allowed Most total HR distance (Brian Matusz)
Matusz had a rough June, allowing 3,589 feet of total home run distance. The main culprit for Matusz? Interleague play. Of the nine home runs he allowed last month, seven came against National League opponents.

Launching Pad: Stadium that totaled the greatest HR distance (Oriole Park at Camden Yards)
Someone ordered the fireworks early in Baltimore, as Oriole Park at Camden Yards allowed 47 home runs for a total distance of 18,826 feet. No other stadium in baseball came close to topping that total in June.

Jay Bruce dialed long-distance like no one else in the big leagues in May, according to ESPN's Home Run Tracker, and Mark Trumbo had the kind of mammoth blast that hadn't been seen in Kansas City in four years. What were some of the other home run oddities from the month of May?

Player Power Surge: HRs Totaling Most Distance (Jay Bruce, Cincinnati Reds)
Mike Stanton averaged more than 425 feet per home run in May, but no one totaled more total distance than Bruce. His 12 home runs tallied 4,776 feet, besting last month's winner, Ryan Braun, by nearly 700 feet. Jose Bautista, who leads the majors in home runs, has yet to win this award.

No Doubter: Longest True Distance (Mark Trumbo, Los Angeles Angels)
Trumbo's Memorial Day blast off of Royals pitcher Louis Coleman at Kauffman Stadium traveled a true distance of 472 feet. It was the longest home run hit by an Angels player since Vladimir Guerrero's 473-foot shot off Zack Greinke at Kauffman on May 1, 2007.

Wall-Scraper: Shortest True Distance (Danny Valencia, Brennan Boesch)
On May 8, Valencia hit a 329-foot HR off Daisuke Matsuzaka. Eleven days later, Boesch hit a 329-foot shot off of Daniel Bard. Both home runs were hit at Fenway Park, which is not surprising. Of the 10 shortest home runs hit in 2011, six have been at Fenway Park.

Moonshot: Highest Apex* (Shelley Duncan, Cleveland Indians)
Duncan's 431-foot shot on Memorial Day off of Blue Jays pitcher Jo-Jo Reyes landed in the fifth deck at Rogers Centre, with an apex of 152 feet. Duncan became just the 15th player to reach the fifth deck at Rogers Centre, and the first since Jayson Werth on June 27, 2009 off of Brad Mills.

Line Drive: Lowest Apex (Carlos Peguero, Seattle Mariners)
Peguero’s May 16 shot came off Twins starter Scott Baker. With an apex of 39 feet, it was the lowest home run hit since Travis Snider’s 39-foot apex home run on May 3, 2010.

Fastball of the Month: Fastest Speed Off Bat (Juan Rivera, Toronto Blue Jays)
While his teammate Jose Bautista may steal all the attention, Rivera hit the fastest speed off bat in May. Rivera’s shot on May 22 off of Astros starter Wandy Rodriguez traveled 117.7 mph off the bat, and went 431 feet.

Server of the Month: Greatest Total Distance Allowed (Bronson Arroyo, Cincinnati Reds)
Arroyo allowed 10 home runs that traveled 3,981 feet. Last month's winner, Armando Galarraga, now finds himself in Triple-A Reno.

* Defined as the maximum vertical height a ball reaches during its flight

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